Short links for July 12th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Ean Golden’s 10 Minute Mini-Set

Over the past few years, we have shown everyone a fair number of controllerism tricks and techniques on this site. Through that time, everyone has consistently expressed a desire to see them used in the context of a real dj set. While it’s not realistic to beat juggle for 30 minutes and keep a dance floor rocking it IS realistic to sprinkle the mix with some amazingly fun routines. In the video above I condense a 30 minute set into 10 minutes of quick mixes that use controllerism as a tool for creative transitions.

Read on for the full 20 minute mix, and a contest in which you can win the midi-fighter controllers.

# Free Sample Friday

Tom at Waveformless has recently posted some nice sample packs as part his “Free Sample Friday” series, now including sounds by guest stars:

  • Alesis Ion Synth Sounds, 11 synth sounds (as 24-bit WAVs) from the Alesis Ion courtesy of Adam W.
  • JX-10 Bass, a bass sound taken from Roland’s JX-10, sampled every ‘C’ note for 7 octaves as 16-bit/44.1k WAV files, by Matthias S.
  • Mouth Drum Kit, 27 sounds as 24-bit/44.1k mono WAV files by Tom.
monome mk

# mk: All New monome Kit Improves on Original; Q+A with Creator Brian Crabtree

Peter Kirn at Create Digital Music writes:

Open hardware means the ability to create exactly what you want. But it doesn’t have to intimidate the newcomer – not so long as you’re up for a project and a little creativity. The monome grid controller, long a sensation with digital musicians, finally sees a major update in its kit version. The “kit” isn’t built from scratch; instead, it includes the major components largely pre-assembled. A US$60 logic board contains the brain and USB port, with all surface-mount soldering done for you. (You don’t even have to upload firmware to make it run). A $40 driver operates the grid. $120 buys you the main guts – just add LEDs yourself (allowing you to pick a color) – and put the grid and pads into a housing.

Pre-orders july 16. shipping late july. More info at monome.org

# Kaossonome, inspired by Korg’s Kaoss Pad and the Monome.

It features Kaoss Pad-like sampling programs and is fully Monome 256 compliant. Additional programs include an algorithmic step sequencer, a beat synced sample chopping performance controller, and many more.

Alexander Randon writes:

The Kaossonome is my first electronic music controller design. It interfaces the musician via a touchscreen, resting on top of a 256 LED matrix, and eight rotary encoders with push‐buttons. Enclosed within an aluminum front panel, a dark wooden frame, and a clear Plexiglas back panel, the controller is protected from external forces and is less than an inch thick. The touchscreen can be controlled with either a finger or a stylus and the knobs turn and toggle with ease. The Kaossonome powers and transmits serial data over USB. The serial data is then intercepted by a modified version of ArduinomeSerial, which transforms the data into MIDI and OSC. The software savvy electronic musician can design intermediate software devices to grab data from the device, route touch-screen presses and rotary encoder changes to musically defined parameters, and then send data back to the device to control the LEDs.

Reveal Sound Spire

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