Short links for October 23rd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Awesome collection of DIY video-glitch hardware

From Make: Online:

The "tools" section of media artist Karl Klomp's website documents an impressive amount of bent, hacked and homebrew hardware for video manipulation. Devices such as the Failter (seen above) series go through a number of incarnations while Karl experiments with different hardware and uncovers its glitch-ability. The retro-simple feel of the enclosures give give it all a nicely 'scientific' almost medical feel.

# Waveformless: Free Sample Friday: SH-101 Percussion

Tom Shear shares another batch of lovely samples.

It's the weekend! Woohoo! Here to start your weekend off right are 20 synth percussion sounds from my Novamodded Roland SH-101 as 24-bit/44.1k WAV files. Enjoy!

# MPC2500 Gutted & Deconstructed (Vimeo) via Crate Kings

Hopefully most Akai owners will never have to witness their beloved music machine being gutted like this MPC2500 was. It’s not exactly pretty sight, but fascinating stuff for those that have been curious about the innards of a sampler/sequencer/drum machine.

# Avid Announces Third Quarter 2009 Results

Some interesting numbers from Avid’s financial department:

Avid® (NASDAQ: AVID) today reported revenues of $153.7 million for the three-month period ended September 30, 2009, compared to $217.1 million for the same period in 2008. The GAAP net loss for the quarter was $16.2 million, or $.43 per share, compared to a GAAP net loss of $66.4 million, or $1.80 per share, in the third quarter of 2008. The third quarter 2008 results included a non-cash impairment charge of $51.3 million or $1.39 per share.

The GAAP net loss for the third quarter of 2009 included amortization of intangibles, stock-based compensation, restructuring charges, loss on asset sales and related tax adjustments, collectively totaling $17.0 million. Excluding these items, the non-GAAP net income was $787 thousand for the third quarter, or $.02 per share.

# 279 / nanopedal via CDM

Marcus Fischer of dust breeding turned a Korg nanoKEY into a foot controller.

Marcus Fisher nanopedal

Marcus writes:

i’ve been wanting a compact usb midi foot pedal for a long time. i built one out of a usb number pad last year but it was less than ideal. tonight i popped all of the keys but five off of my korg nanokey in order to see how it would work as a pedal. it turned out that it worked really well. i cut some small pieces of plywood out to raise the key height and some scrap plexiglass to cover up the missing keys. a little spray paint and double stick tape and it was all finished.

i think it turned out pretty well. not bad for a cheap keyboard and scrap materials.

# The Stretta Procedure: Lego Foosball

Matthew Davidson made a Lego Fußball table for his son.

My son is really attracted to foosball tables, and, if I'm honest, I'd have to say I am too. I considered the idea of buying a small, tabletop unit, but I was unsure how much use it'd see. I was afraid it might become one of those things you play with for a bit, then collect dust. Once again, I see a solution in the form of Lego.

Korg DS-10 by sushipop @ Flickr

# Going Mobile: Nintendo DS-10 Comes to North America

Peter Kirn @ CDM writes:

Fans of the Nintendo DS in North America, the Korg DS-10 Plus synthesizer for Big N’s game system is now coming to your side of the Pacific Ocean. (That also bodes well, I think, for other parts of the world.) The DS-10 I think really deserves some credit for making a straight-up music title a hit on gaming platforms, and its success certainly surpassed my own expectations. It’s not a game, it’s not an interactive experience, it’s not a music game – it’s actually a synth and music workstation that happens to run on a game platform. The DS-10 Plus beefs up the original’s features, though it now has a commercially-available rival in the form of Rockstar’s Beaterator for PSP.

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