Results for audiocubes

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'audiocubes'.

Note: Use the search form in the top right if you're looking for something specific.

  

Short links for August 24th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# The World’s Biggest Drum Machine

If you ever wonder what we do at night here at the PHQ, here it the answer: We build large, silly drum controllers and haul them across town.

# Find, Remix and Reuse – SoundCloud Style

SoundCloud gets advanced search, browse by tag, and Creative Commons integration.

Choice is good, right? We just love that we can pick our favorite ice cream flavor or favorite color for a new shirt. When it comes to audio creation, it’s even better when your choice creates more choice for others.

Today, SoundCloud is opening up a bit more to allow you to find and share more sounds to use and reuse. With new search and discovery features for Creative Commons tracks, your creations can go much further. More options give you more freedom over your audio content on the web. It helps expose your work and find people to collaborate with that you perhaps wouldn’t normally find. We’re excited about this update and we hope you are too. We say “New features!” you say “Yay!”

Some of my music and samples (both Creative Commons licensed) are available from SoundCloud as well.

# Incredible vintage lucite organ for sale

Wersi Electronics Delta Digital DX500
Wersi Electronics Delta Digital DX500

From Boing Boing:

Over at ye olde Submitterator, Pea Hix points us to this magnificent c.1970 lucite Wersi Digital DX500 organ and speakers for sale.

“The Delta Digital DX500 organ comes replete with all manuals, control panel templates, music stand, amplified speakers, lucite dollies, pedal board, adjustable bench and chromed keys. And it works beautifully!!!” Just $85,000 at 1stdibs.com.

# Free Synth Patch Friday: 12 New Patches for Camel Audio Alchemy

Tom @ Waveformless is back with some free sounds:

We have a little something different instead of Free Sample Friday this week. Instead, we have Free Synth Patch Friday. Below are 12 weird, original patches for Camel Audio Alchemy programmed by yours truly. Enjoy!

More patches from Tom are available on Waveformless

Mark Mosher's setup

# Percussa AudioCube Production and Performance Notes for “I Hear Your Signals”

Mark writes:

For my original music album “I Hear Your Signals” (download the album free) I use Percussa Audiocubes as performance controllers. In this post I’ll give you all the geeky details about how the controllers were applied in the project.

I used 4 AudioCubes plus Percussa’s free MIDIbridge app on Windows to configure and route AudioCube signals to Ableton Live. I use the same MIDIbridge patch for every song which allows for consistent and predictable data mapping from the cubes to Ableton Live.

In general, I play a lot of the notes on you hear on the album via keyboards, Theremin and Tenori-On live. I tend to use the cubes as controllers, for scene launching, and for real-time modulation of effects and synth parameters and only use them for triggering notes from time to time.

# V-Synth GT Richard Devine Patches

Roland has released a free collection custom V-Synth GT Patches from Atlanta-based electronic musician, composer and sound designer Richard Devine.

comment

Short links for August 18th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Shamantis – J. BIEBZ – U SMILE 800% SLOWER

I’m pretty sure you’ve already heard (about) this, but I just wanted to stress the fact that it’s the excellent Paul Stretch that makes stuff sound cool.

# Dan303: Percussion/Bass Pack

Dan303 returns with another free pack of samples.

Here's a little sample pack I put together using my Microkorg and FB383 synthesizers.
This Pack contains 4 Bass Patches [NNXT] and 22 synth Percussion hits

# SoundPrism – Colorful, Playable iPad App – and Organizing Tones and Harmony Visually

Peter Kirn talks with Sebastian Dittmann, CEO of developer Audanika, developer of SoundPrism, the app they describe as something they are not entirely sure of what it is. From audanika.com: "We think it might be a musical instrument but we're learning new stuff playing with it every day… which sometimes goes beyond the scale of that."

Peter Kirn writes:

Using an array of rectangles arranged in a harmonically useful way, and color coding for pitch, SoundPrism is a glimpse of a more graphical future for music software design. (Nor is this necessarily limited to the iPad in the long term – in addition to Windows 7, Ubuntu 10.10 is getting official multitouch support, which I think both validates Apple’s work and suggests we’ll see more platforms for this kind of interface.)

And, bonus, it all demonstrates why arranging pitch by the Circle of Thirds can be ideal. I got a chance to talk to the developers of SoundPrism about the thinking behind the software.

More info on SoundPrism: Audanika

# Ableton Live Quick Tip – Resampling and Sample-Based Workflow

From Nick's Tutorials:

Resampling is an incredibly simple yet powerful technique in digital music production. The idea is straighforward: Record the output of one or multiple tracks into a new, editable audio file. It’s not much different than rendering your composition, except here you’re actually going to incorporate the new file into the current song.

# Celebrating Leon Theremin’s Birthday with Video, Notes, Links, and a Soundcloud Set

Mark at Modulate This! writes:

Leon Theremin (born Lev Sergeyevich Terme) was born on this day, August 15th, 1896. To help celebrate I’m going to do a bit of a stream of consciousness post and will offer some links on Leon and his wonderful instrument and some notes on my use of it.

Hang in there till the end of the post as I’ve created a Soundcloud set called “Theremin Action” which is a collection of all the songs from REBOOT and I Hear Your Signals that use that Theremin sound or Theremin as a Controller.

Mark Mosher using the Theremin as a spatial controller to control virtual digital synthesizers running out of Ableton Live in combination with Percussa AudioCubes
Mark controls virtual synths in Ableton Live using the Theremin and Percussa AudioCubes
comment

Short links for April 12th, 2010

Thomann's Packaging for 2 Shure N447 needles

Some interesting things I found recently:

# The one thing I don’t like about Thomann

Good example of a company that probably hasn’t heard of green packaging or cradle to cradle yet (at least it doesn’t seem to care much)…

Looza @ Mindboggling writes:

Every few months I need to make a certain hifi-related purchase. My retailer of choice for this is of course thomann.de, hands down the best european retailer for audio, music and hifi-related stuff. Great selection, great prices, amazing service.

However, there is one thing about thomann that really drives me insane now that I experienced it several times.

# My Blofeld + Ableton Live + Lpk25 + AudioCube Couch Potato Setup

Mark @ Modulate This! writes:

I wanted to create a small couch-friendly setup where I could play the Waldorf Blofeld with my little Akai LPK25 Controller and an AudioCube. Here is how I set it all up.

Electro Harmonix V256 Vocoder

# cl516: Electro Harmonix V256 Vocoder

Calvin got himself an Electro Harmonix V256 Vocoder:

Simple setup with a Shure 55SH and the V256 set to HI gain. Segments alternate from internal synth to Vermona Perfourmer as the carrier. I didn't play around too much with the "reflex-tune" or other features. I just like the vocoder part. The audio file has more detailed narration.

Best audio demo I’ve heard in a while.

# Beatstation

Second video of Toontrack's upcoming "Tonal and Percussive, Open Surface, New Generation Virtual Instrument" now available:

Check out the sounds in Beatstation, the new expansion pack format, BTX, and how to use the core library with Audio, MIDI and REX content.

# Exploding piano alarm clock

From Make: Online:

Here's a video of a nifty Exploding Piano Alarm Clock that was recently made in a graduate product design class at MIT. One of MAKE's former interns, Jake McKenzie, was part of the team who created it. They based their project on the traditional piano drop held every spring off the MIT Baker House.

Exploding Piano Alarm Clock
Exploding Piano Alarm Clock

The premise is simple and aggravating: the piano and its color-coded legs explode once the alarm goes off. The user's task is to gather up all the parts and put the legs in their corresponding color slots. All while the alarm annoyingly beeps at you. The rub: the color slots move around, so you have to be agile (and awake) to get the correct legs in the correct slots. A knob on the bottom allows you to adjust the difficulty by speeding up the rate of the color changes.

# Rethinkyoyo – Want to learn some new yoyo tricks? Check Rethinkyoyo for a great collection of tutorial videos.

comment

Short links for February 22nd, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# The Stretta Procedure: Free 2GB modular synth sample library

Matthew Davidson writes:

If you woke up this morning thinking, "Gee, I wish I could download two gigabytes of 120 BPM modular synth loops", I have some good news for you.

I've been using the TipTop Audio Z8000 for a while now, collecting material for a video, but I also kept a DAW file handy and recorded bursts of interesting output at various intervals. This process generated a lot of materal, but it is clear to me it would be more useful in someone else's hands.

Beatseqr

# Beatseqr

Beatseqr is an arduino mega based computer interface by Steve Cooley.

It is aimed at electronic musicians and visualists. By itself, it connects to a desktop app that runs on mac or windows and can send out OSC messages to arbitrary network ports. However, combine beatseqr with a tightly integrated sequencer like Dajis Systems' Steppa (included in the price) and you have a powerful interface to create a MIDI loop which you can use to control sounds from pretty much any music software that accepts incoming midi data.

We've tested it out with Logic, Live, Reason, Quartz Composer, Max/MSP, PureData, and Processing. It works great!

# C O D E O R G A N

The CodeOrgan analyses the "body" content of any web page and translates that content into music. The CodeOrgan uses a complex algorithm to define the key, synth style and drum pattern most appropriate to the page content.

# Bliptronome v2 w/ ADCs complete! – Bliptronic to Monome Conversion (YouTube)

The final working version of the Bliptronic 5000 hacked into a low cost Monome clone, with Bliptronome V2 firmware.

More info at Stray Technologies

# Want Some Free Samples for your Multimedia Project?

Nick @ Nick's Tutorials:

Matt Pacyga and I have teamed up to release some free sample downloads resulting from our respective field recording experiments. Matt has put together a superb set of crunches and splats which originally emanated from his kitchen and some very unlucky food items. The recordings are high quality and super-creative, so I highly encourage you to take advantage of his generosity and download these sounds!

I've also got a number of samples on offer here that came from some contact microphone experiments, but I'll defer to the official description (after the jump) for the details

Pressure Controller Hubert

# Pressure Controller "Hubert"

Hubert is small but powerful device to use with your modular synthesizer.

On each hand side there is one force sensing resistor turning applied pressure into a steady CV output. Each channel has three outputs: CV Out, Inverted CV Out and Gate out. Each side is capable of holding the current voltage on CV Out, whereas the inverted CV appears on Inverted CV Out. If a CV is held in the CV Out you still can use the inverted out, even switching from positive to negative voltage as often as you want without disturbing the held CV output. In addition each of the two channels fires a gate signal every time pressure is applied to the pressure pad. The CV can go from 0V to +/- 8V and can be controlled in sensitivity.

# Interview with Bert Schiettecatte Inventor of Percussa AudioCubes

Mark Mosher of Modulate This! talks with AudioCubes inventor Bert Schiettecatte:

I recently conducted a phone interview with Percussa founder and AudioCube inventor Bert Schiettecatte.

I think music artists, visual artists, sound designers, those interested in tangible interfaces for installations, and music technology fans will all enjoy this interview – even if you are not in the market for a tangible interface.

# TAPETRONIC demo video 2009 (YouTube)

Reaktor modular sequencing

# Reaktor Modular Sequencing, Pt. 2

John Fisher writes:

Well, looks like my weekend project has been working on my modular sequencing application for Reaktor.

I’ve detailed what this is all about in my previous blog. I’ve updated the sequencer and added some detailed comments on all the GUI elements to help people get up to speed with using it.

comment

Short links for December 22nd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Make: Online : Open source hardware 2009

Make’s definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2009.

Make:Online open source hardware 2009

Welcome to definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2009. First up – What is open source hardware? These are projects in which the creators have decided to completely publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files to recreate the hardware – they also allow any use, including commercial. Similar to open source software like Linux, but this hardware centric.

Each year we do a guide to all open source hardware and this year there are over 125 unique projects/kits in 19 categories, up from about 60 in 2008, more than doubling the projects out there! – it’s incredible! Many are familiar with Arduino (shipping over 100,000 units, estimated) but there are many other projects just as exciting and filled with amazing communities – we think we’ve captured nearly all of them in this list. Some of these projects and kits are available from MAKE others from the makers themselves or other hardware manufacturers – but since it’s open source hardware you can make any of these yourself, start a business, everything is available, that’s the point.

# fridgebuzzz electronics MK1 MIDI controller

fridgebuzzz MK1

The MK1 prototype is a user programmable midi controller featuring 32 LED pushbutton switches and 6 touch sensitive copper plate switches.

# satrap activ portable analog synthesizer (YouTube)

Flo Kaufmann shows his “satrap activ” portable analog synthesizer made out of a vacuum cleaner.

It contains 2 cmos based VCO’s , a Moog ladder filter, a 555 based ADSR, a cmos based 8 step sequencer, a PIC based vc to midi interface and a PIC based auto trigger unit. There are 4 tunable knobs on top, mostly to play base lines, and 2 conductable wires, which act as voltage dividers to generate variable tones. the wires do not vibrate. so it is not a cord instrument. satrap activ can also control other synthesizers either by midi or cv/gate interface.

Mark Mosher's Audio Cubes

# Percussa Audio Cubes: Lights & Tangible Interface with Ableton Live and Alchemy

Mark Mosher writes about his Audio Cubes:

I recently added Percussa AudioCubes to my studio and performance rig.

While I’m planning a longer post offering an overview of how AudioCubes work, this is a quick post to mention two applications of AudioCube technology I’ve been experimenting with.

# Larry Cotton’s MIDI Marimba

Larry Cotton’s 3-octave “player marimba” was featured in MAKE, Volume 4. Larry added two MD24 MIDI Decoders and the marimba can now be controlled by any MIDI sequencer or keyboard.

L2Ork (image by CDM)

# An Orchestra of Linux Laptops, and How to Make Your Own Laptop Instrument

Peter Kirn @ Create Digital Music:

For a generation of musicians of nearly every genre, the laptop has become an instrument. It’s easy to take for granted, but the rise of the computer for music has been remarkable. Less than twenty years ago, real-time digital synthesis and audio processing was the domain of expensive, specialized workstations. Now, $700 per seat can buy you a full-blown musical rig, with the computer hardware, gestural input courtesy the Nintendo Wii controller, and even a DIY speaker made from IKEA salad bowls. The next challenge is to make this setup as flexible and reliable as possible. Enter Linux.

Marblephone

# Marblephone

g000ze @ Let's Make Robots writes:

Inspired by Animusic's bodacious films, I was wondering whether a music robot in a much more simple way would be possible to make. Here is what my little boys and I created.

Still unfinished, but already working. Thank you Animusic for activating my imagination building the music machine that I am calling Marblephone.

# Line 6 JM4 Looper Review (with Video)

Joe Glider of Home Studio Corner has a reivew of the Line 6 JM4 Looper pedal:

I’ve always been absolutely fascinated with looper pedals. Any time an artist uses one in a performance, I’m spellbound. As soon as you introduce a looper pedal into your setup, suddenly all the rules change. You’re no longer a solo performer, you’re an entire ensemble. It’s like you brought a recording studio right on stage with you, and now you’re doing an overdub session for all of us to see. Fascinating.

Needless to say, I’ve wanted a looper pedal for years. Thanks to the good folks at Line 6, now I have one!* What I love about the JM4 is that it’s not JUST a looper. It’s an entire guitar workstation. It has both amp modeling and three different selectable effects.

PongThatBeat! (Vimeo)

PingPong sequencer made with max/msp and processing.

# Langjokull, Snaefellsjokull, Solheimajokull – Three glacier ice records, played until they melt.

comment

Percussa releases Modulor for AudioCubes

Related: , , , , , , , , Posted in news on Oct 26, 2009 - comment 0 comments
Percussa Modulor

Percussa has released Modulor, an application developed specifically for the Percussa AudioCubes hardware.

It lets you record, loop, process and assemble musical information, to quickly develop musical ideas.

The software works with your existing MIDI keyboard and controllers, professional audio interface (CoreAudio or ASIO) and software virtual instruments (VSTs or AudioUnits).

Loops in the software can be easily put together by putting their physical representation together (AudioCubes). Powerful MIDI effects are available to process the recorded or live MIDI information.

Interacting with software instruments using your hands is easy using the onboard sensors of AudioCubes. Colours can be used on AudioCubes to colour-code looping recordings or MIDI effects.

When you’re done, save your work in bank files or export the result to a MIDI file, ready to be used in your DAW or other software, where more tracks can be added and you can start working on a mix.

Modulor is available for Windows PC and Mac OSX, free of cost.

More information: Percussa / Modulor

comment

Short links for October 22nd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Percussa AudioCubes workshop

# Audio Cubes: Tangible Interface for Audiovisual Creation, a Percussa workshop

AudioCubes designer Bert Schiettecatte will be hosting a series of one day workshops at his private workspace, for a select number of artists, starting November 10th 2009.

Workshop description: Starting with some theory, you will discover the history of AudioCubes, tangible interfaces, and their applications. The practical part of the workshop will let you master the technical aspects of using AudioCubes in sound, music and visual creation, and let you work on your own project using AudioCubes.

Topics covered:

  • history of audiocubes
  • overview of tangible interfaces
  • why were audiocubes created / fundamental ideas
  • how audiocubes work
  • the audiocubes hardware
  • audiocubes software for live performance, sound design and music production
  • how to use audiocubes to control MIDI software and hardware
  • how to MIDI map audiocubes
  • how to use AudioCubes with Max/MSP

# Google Prepares Music Search Service

From Wired.com:

Google plans to launch a music service, Wired.com has confirmed with sources familiar with the situation. Next to nothing is known about the service at this point, rumored to be called “Google Music,” “Google Audio,” or “One Box,” although we have confirmed that it will be announced next Wednesday, and that it will link out to two music services: Lala and iLike.

# Plogue Chipsounds review – retrogaming nostalgia

Torley takes a look at Plogue Chipsounds.

Tom Shear @ Waveformless shares his thoughts in his Chipsounds review

What excites me most about Chipsounds is the possibilities for the future. I’d love to see a couple options that weren’t present in the original machine introduced here. A filter section would definitely expand the possibilities (a handful of chips have filters available as their chip-specific settings), a more useful and flexible Portamento function would be great, and, as mentioned before, a wider array of effects would be a nice addition. That said, imposing the limitations of the original chips is not a bad thing in my opinion. It encourages the same kind of creative thinking and workarounds the original programmers used to use back in the day to get sounds you wouldn’t expect to be possible with such limited means. Plogue has approached this softsynth with a palpable sense of reverence and their affection for these outdated sound makers shines through in abundance. An exceptionally fun and unique instrument! [8/10]

# 2009 Roland Keyz ’n Beats Summit

The 2009 Roland Keyz ’n Beats Summit will be taking place in Hollywood, CA at the famous Musicians Institute on Saturday, October 24, 2009.

Space is limited, so pre-register now! Plus, you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a new JUNO-Di Synthesizer or SP-404SX Linear Wave Sampler. (Note: You must be present to win your prize.)

DIY Flux Capacitor Expander

# Veqtor’s corner: DIY Flux Capacitor Expander

Göran Sandström writes:

This demonstration uses my crude DIY flux capacitor for the Livewire AFG, basically 5 switches and 10 jacks corresponding to the flux cap pins. Two pin pairs are attenuated by two VCA's controlled by the makenoise/wiard wogglebug, crosspatched with the malekko/wiard noisering, which drives the melodic noodling, via a A-189-1 used as a bitcrusher, to perform cheap quantizing.

The sine output is sent to an input of a makenoise QMMG, driven by the A-143-1 envelope. About halfways through, a feedback path from the animated pulses, animated by A-143-1 LFOs, into the A-106-6 xpander filter (wogglebug controlled) goes into one of the pins on the flux cap expander, resulting in strange noises and unpredictable overtones.

# $10 Arduino Beatbox (remake of the $5 Picaxe Beatbox)

This is a simple sequencer machine which uses Capacitative Sensing Code for input to the Arduino. It is is a combination drumpad and sequencer. It has just two modes, record, and playback, and needs very few components; an Arduino (of course), and just 3 resistors and a piezo speaker. If you're feeling decadent, you can add an LED (with a resistor) for more "ooomph".

Seeed Studio DSO Nano

# Seeed Studio DSO Nano, Pocket Digital Storage Oscilloscope – Review

Blair Thompson reviews the Seeed Studio DSO Nano:

For those starting out in electronics as a hobby there are some tools that are required for the job. To begin with, a soldering iron, some screw drivers, perhaps tweezers and of course a multi-meter are probably what you would consider essential.

After a while though, you are going to be looking for more. Amongst the other goodies out there to help you on your way are oscilloscopes. In the past, advice on forums has always tended more towards purchasing a second hand scope. These tend to be had for around £100 on places like E-bay and most certainly will be a few years old if available at this sort of price. Well that is changing and I was excited yesterday to get my hands on a “Scope” that may just re-write the forum advice. Meet the Nano DSO from Seed Studio…

# eric archer . net » mini space rockers

Eric posts some samples of his mini space rockers analog percussion synthesizer.

Here are over 80 different electro drum / noise samples from the mini space rockers circuit… but you should really build it because its analog and it sounds a little different every time. and its cheap, so no excuses. I am offering these samples under a Creative Commons Attribution license. That means you are free to use them for whatever, but please credit me where appropriate.

PetSynth

# PetSynth

Chiron Bramberger turns his synth for the Commodore PET open source.

Petsynth features a two-octave keyboard layout, selectable note length, many selectable octaves, selectable pulse-width, vibrato, distortion, and noise or “drum mode” depending on how you use it.

All this without adding or hacking the Commodore PET in any way. Plus, it’s compiling from C, so it’s FAST – with very low latency.

The drum sounds are also crazy weird. You can also set the vibrato so high it sounds more like a laser gun or alien telephone.

# app:monome_tweet_reader [monome]

The Monome Tweet Reader is a simple application to display Twitter updates on your monome. It’s written in Java and should work on most platforms.

# Kseniya Simonova – Sand Animation – Ukraine’s Got Talent 2009 Winner

Kseniya Simonova is an Ukrainian artist who won Ukraine's Got Talent 2009. She uses a giant light box, dramatic music, imagination and "sand painting" skills to interpret Germany's invasion and occupation of Ukraine during WWII.

More on Kseniya Simonova

# m4l.lab.serialin – arduino controller for max 4 live (Vimeo)

Testing m4l interfacing capabilities with arduino through max's [serial] object. A simple 4-sensor controller for an FM synth. Analog and digital information is mapped onto midi control messages that can be routed inside live for events or modulation.

comment