Short links for February 9th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# MStretchSynth Demo – Kevin Schlei (2010)

'MStretchSynth' uses multi-point (multi-touch) data streams to create a synthesis instrument driven by the relationships between points. Instead of mapping touch positions (X and Y coordinates) directly to synthesis parameters, relationships such as angle, distance, and velocity compared to other points are used.

'MStretchSynth' uses angle, distance and total velocity between points to map to synthesis parameters pitch, amplitude and delay depth.

Harmonic Ratio Arpeggiator

# Harmonic Ratio Arpeggiator

John Fisher writes:

This is my first system for making melodies and chords in just intonation: a harmonic arpeggiator. There are two different tables containing numbers for the numerator and denominator, and these tables can be moved through independently, at different speeds. Midi input triggers notes, but only the time and octave of the input notes is taken, and the rest is controlled by the ratio sequencers. I have implemented this system in both my Nord g2 modular and in Reaktor, so I can make them work together.

# Gotta Groove Records – "Groove With Us"

Nick Cavalier’s short documentary about a new vinyl pressing plant in Cleveland Ohio, called "Gotta Groove Records".

They specialize in 7" and 12" Vinyl creation/manufacturing using PVC molding. Check them out here: gottagrooverecords.com

# Five EQ mistakes and how to avoid them

Kim Lajoie writes:

EQ is one of the most important tools available to audio engineers. Used correctly, instruments sound great and seem to fit together effortlessly. Used incorrectly, the mix resembles a battlefield with every instrument trying to destroy the others while fighting to be heard. One of the difficulties of EQ is that it is relative – the right settings depend entirely on the raw sound and the mix; there are no specific settings that will work every time. The key to using EQ effectively is to learn how to listen to the raw sound and identify what tonal changes will emphasise its best qualities and make it work in the mix.

# K-Def x Beaterator

Wax Poetics partnered with Rockstar Games to create a series of short films showcasing the new mobile studio/beatmaker for the PSP, Rockstar’s Beaterator.

More from Wax Poetics Beaterator videos here.

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Short links for October 6th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Arduino Contest

# Arduino Contest

Show what you can do with Arduino!

Arduinos are awesome – with one simple controller, you can make almost anything! What new things can you make with Arduino? We've teamed up with the creative folks at Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories and the Arduino Team on an Arduino contest to find out.

The rules are simple: to enter you must make a new Instructable that involves the Arduino IDE. You can use any hardware that you like, or none at all. Be sure to provide the code you used so that others can follow in your footsteps. Make something amazing and win a sweet Meggy Jr RGB from Evil Mad Science or an Arduino Mega from the Arduino Team to power your next project!

So what are you waiting for? Document a project you've been meaning to write up, or make something new! We can't wait to see what it is.

The contest deadline is 15 November, 2009.

# Commodore 64 As Bitcrusher Audio Effect – Sebastian Tomczak of little-scale uses a C64 as a bit crusher effect (with visuals)

# Beaterator Music Challenge

Rockstar Games has launched the Beaterator and MySpace Music Challenge, a contest for the recently released music application Beaterator for PSP system. The aim of the Challenge is to highlight emerging artists using the Beaterator platform as a tool for music production. The Challenge winner will receive a cash prize of $5,000!

Beaterator

Artists that are chosen as semi-finalists will have the opportunity to have two songs featured on the Challenge promotion page, where MySpace Music and Rockstar Games fans will be able to check out the competition and vote on their favorite songs. The first song will be your “featured song” — the one that you feel best represents your sound.
The second song will be one that you create using Beaterator, which can be an original track, remix, or other song that showcases your use of the Beaterator software.
The winning artist or band will receive $5,000, have their winning track featured on the PlayStation®Network – which is visited by millions of PlayStation owners every day, and they will also have the opportunity to be featured on the MySpace homepage.

Beaterator is a music-making application for PSP system that acts as a portable 8-track music studio. In addition to the 3,000 included loops, it features a drum machine, full keyboard, synthesizer and sequencer; as well as the ability to import any sound via either a Memory Stick Duo™ or the PSP system’s built-in microphone. This is a true portable music studio.

# Modulate This Electronic Music Blog Turns 4

Modulate This!

Mark Mosher writes:

Modulate This has turned 4 years old! In year 3 the blog experienced non-linear growth in page views and subscribers.

Congrats, Mark! Love the blog.

If you’ve never checked Modulate This! before make sure you do. This blog on electronic music production and sound design is a wonderful source of articles, videos, downloads etc.

cl516 Omega 8

# cl516: Omega 8 as a Drum Machine.

cl516 turns a Studio Electronics Omega 8 into a drum machine.

Rather than play the usual handful of musical hooks, I thought wouldn't it be useful if it was drum loop time.

Well, long gone are my TR-909, TR-808, Machinedrum, Xbase09, MFB-502, and I haven't picked up those D16 plugins yet. So I decided, why not use the Omega 8?

# SampleRadar: 328 free drum ‘n’ bass samples

For our sixth instalment, our musical microscope has fallen on drum 'n' bass. This may be a genre that had its big moment in the mainstream more than a decade ago, but it continues to thrive and its influence is felt on the likes of grime, dubstep and ghettotech.

# Video Ram Synth 1

Gijs Gieskes uses the video ram of a Sega as an audio source.

Gijs Gieskes Video Ram Synth 1

The video ram of the sega gets slowed down by a binary counter, so it can be used as a audio source.

There are 3 oscillators that control a multiplexer, the multiplexer connects 1 out of 8 patch cables to the binary counters input, so there are some nice changing patterns in the sound.
Another multiplexer is connected to the same oscillators and makes some extra connections to glitch some more video.

There is a magnetic patch bay for the video ram, and the sega controller on the front can also be connected with magnets or metal wands.
The original idea was that the device can be used for drums, buts more a synth.. In another version i will probably build a small sequencer into it..

I will probably mainly use it for exhibitions, it is allot of fun to play with, because you control the sound and the video at the same time.

# Fresh Squeezed – Orange Tree Samples Blog

Orange Tree Samples' official blog will include articles, tutorials, videos, product demonstrations, artist interviews, and much more.

Subjects include everything from tips and tricks for using Orange Tree Samples libraries to instructions on how to create your own sample libraries! "Fresh Squeezed" will also discuss the sample library industry's latest technologies as well as explore sampling in pursuit of greater realism. Hopefully this will prove to be a useful resource for Orange Tree Samples customers as well as sample library users and computer musicians in general.

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