Results for Brian Crabtree

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parallelogram mlrv 2.0, Max/MSP instrument for grid-based controllers

Parallelogram has announced its mlrv 2.0 a hypersampling instrument for grid-based music controllers like the monome, livid ohm/block, novation launchpad, and akai apc/mpd.

the software allows a sound file or live recording to be mapped across each row (or grid cell) and assigned a triggering behavior. within this simple set of constraints and a complete MIDI + OSC remote control system, the performer of electronic music can be freed from the laptop, and at the very least appear to be doing something interesting. mlrv is an refactoring of brian crabtree’s original mlr, extended by trent gill (galapagoose) and michael felix (%) of /parallelogram/

mlrv 2.0 is open source software. It will be available to download at no cost on 1 February, 2011. Two additional licenses are available to purchase as well: +supporter at $18 USD, +benefactor for $80 USD.

  • +supporters and +benefactors get their names displayed on the loading screen.
  • +benefactors get the added bonus of having their names shown in huge text.
  • +benefactors also receive a limited edition galapagoose + % collabo 7″ vinyl record.

More information: parallelogram / mlrv

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Short links for July 12th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Ean Golden’s 10 Minute Mini-Set

Over the past few years, we have shown everyone a fair number of controllerism tricks and techniques on this site. Through that time, everyone has consistently expressed a desire to see them used in the context of a real dj set. While it’s not realistic to beat juggle for 30 minutes and keep a dance floor rocking it IS realistic to sprinkle the mix with some amazingly fun routines. In the video above I condense a 30 minute set into 10 minutes of quick mixes that use controllerism as a tool for creative transitions.

Read on for the full 20 minute mix, and a contest in which you can win the midi-fighter controllers.

# Free Sample Friday

Tom at Waveformless has recently posted some nice sample packs as part his “Free Sample Friday” series, now including sounds by guest stars:

  • Alesis Ion Synth Sounds, 11 synth sounds (as 24-bit WAVs) from the Alesis Ion courtesy of Adam W.
  • JX-10 Bass, a bass sound taken from Roland’s JX-10, sampled every ‘C’ note for 7 octaves as 16-bit/44.1k WAV files, by Matthias S.
  • Mouth Drum Kit, 27 sounds as 24-bit/44.1k mono WAV files by Tom.
monome mk

# mk: All New monome Kit Improves on Original; Q+A with Creator Brian Crabtree

Peter Kirn at Create Digital Music writes:

Open hardware means the ability to create exactly what you want. But it doesn’t have to intimidate the newcomer – not so long as you’re up for a project and a little creativity. The monome grid controller, long a sensation with digital musicians, finally sees a major update in its kit version. The “kit” isn’t built from scratch; instead, it includes the major components largely pre-assembled. A US$60 logic board contains the brain and USB port, with all surface-mount soldering done for you. (You don’t even have to upload firmware to make it run). A $40 driver operates the grid. $120 buys you the main guts – just add LEDs yourself (allowing you to pick a color) – and put the grid and pads into a housing.

Pre-orders july 16. shipping late july. More info at monome.org

# Kaossonome, inspired by Korg’s Kaoss Pad and the Monome.

It features Kaoss Pad-like sampling programs and is fully Monome 256 compliant. Additional programs include an algorithmic step sequencer, a beat synced sample chopping performance controller, and many more.

Alexander Randon writes:

The Kaossonome is my first electronic music controller design. It interfaces the musician via a touchscreen, resting on top of a 256 LED matrix, and eight rotary encoders with push‐buttons. Enclosed within an aluminum front panel, a dark wooden frame, and a clear Plexiglas back panel, the controller is protected from external forces and is less than an inch thick. The touchscreen can be controlled with either a finger or a stylus and the knobs turn and toggle with ease. The Kaossonome powers and transmits serial data over USB. The serial data is then intercepted by a modified version of ArduinomeSerial, which transforms the data into MIDI and OSC. The software savvy electronic musician can design intermediate software devices to grab data from the device, route touch-screen presses and rotary encoder changes to musically defined parameters, and then send data back to the device to control the LEDs.

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