Results for cardboard

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'cardboard'.

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Taleweaver Orchestra releases Ancient Heavy Boxes for Kontakt

Ancient Heavy Boxes

Taleweaver Orchestra has announced Ancient Heavy Boxes, a cinematic percussion library for Native Instruments Kontakt 5.

What is so special about this library? Ten cardboard-boxes have been recorded in different positions and styles. We used sticks, brushes and hammers. We hit, scratched and smashed them. And after recording over 5.000 samples we chose 2.500 to be the best so we can come up with 15 unique patches:

  • Bass Drum 1 & 2
  • Brushed Boxes 1 – 6
  • Paper Djembe
  • Taikos 1 – 3
  • Tom Drums 1 – 3

Boxes? Made of paper? Hit with drumsticks?!

Yeah, we know how crazy that sounds. But recorded in the right way they really sound fantastic! We found out that paperboxes have a special unique sound that can give some very interesting edge to a track.

The sample library is available to purchase for the introductory price of 28.80 EUR until February 28th, 2014 (regular 42 EUR).

More information: Taleweaver Orchestra

Short links for January 5th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Reactableton

reactable final Prototype, used with ableton didnt need ir filter or any of that, light does not hinder the pick up of the fiducial by way of blocking out the light with frosted plexi. , made out of cardboard , plexi and christmas lights!

# Trifonic’s Music, Beat Slicing Technique, Free Bass Patch

Peter Kirn writes:

No more secrets: that could well sum up the zeitgeist of music making in 2010. So it is that Trifonic, aka virtuoso beatmeister brothers Brian and Laurence Trifon of San Francisco, share their technique for chopping up and glitching out audio. Their new blog, Next Step Audio, is entirely dedicated to sharing their production techniques: http://nextstepaudio.com/

# Stompolin – Mike Rotondo's Stompolin is a digital instrument created at a Physical Interaction Design workshop at CCRMA.

It is designed to allow the player to create music by involving their whole body, instead of focusing on the hands as many traditional instruments do. My goal was to accurately capture the emotional content of full-body movements, whether gentle or vigorous, and transmit it as music.

# A Visual History Of Loudness – Christopher Clark graphed the peak levels of and RMS levels of three hit songs a year over the past three decades in "A Visual History Of Loudness."

# The free RTAS plug-ins list

Stiff @ ProToolerBlog has listed a collection of free RTAS plug-ins:

I have compiled a list of all the free RTAS plug-ins I could think of. The list is nowhere near as long as a free VST list would be but nonetheless there are quite a few handy plug-ins here. Needless to say, while this is an RTAS plug-in list, most of them should be available in VST and AU as well.

Create Digital Music Winter 2008 guide

CDM Winter 2008

Last month Create Digital Music asked its readers to share what they would want to receive, give to newcomers, and what they would want to read.

Yesterday CDM presented the Winter 2008 guide, a wonderful publication (print edition + pdf download) including a Holiday Guide, Circuit bending 101, Dan McPharlin’s cardboard miniature synths, Ableton Live slicing tutorial (including freebie) and much more.

For digital musicians and lovers of sound, Create Digital Music Winter 2008 extends the popular website createdigitalmusic.com with a handbook of the best in products, how-to’s, and features.

In this issue, we explore the best products and gifts for beginners and advanced users, from synths to strange music controllers to software to books and listening. We learn how to slice up audio into powerful software drum machines in Ableton Live, with a free companion download at covops.org/cdm. Dan McPharlin shows us his intricate, imaginary synth designs, constructed by hand in cardboard. Sound artist Mike Una introduces circuit bending, which gives you the power to turn cheap toys into strange sonic wonders. Technologists reflect on the best in design, the potential of open source, and how to use music to survive Berlin’s drab, wet, and cold winters.

Unlike traditional editorial-only content, the CDM Winter guide is full of ideas and images from the createdigitalmusic community.

The CDM Winter 2008 guide is released under the Creative Commons
Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. You can download the pdf version from lulu.com, free of charge — this publication is a true gift in itself!

Short links for July 28th, 2008

Ohm - lo-fi cardboard sampler

Some interesting things I found on July 28th, 2008:

# “ohm” lo-fi cardboard sampler – “Ohm” is a series of electronic lo-fi noiseboxes/recorders made with laser cut grey cardboard.

The interface and the inner circuits are printed with a special conductive paint. By touching the printed surface the user can modify the sound in different ways.

# DIY Monome Clone – Julien Bayle uses an arduino board to create a Monome clone.

Julien writes:

At the beginning, I would like to inspire me from the big MONODECK II made by Robert Henke. I explore the BIG and powerful MIDIbox.org community and the shop site associated ucapps.de, and I found a website about a very pretty and powerful interface: monome. But the monome was only a monochromatic leds & buttons matrix. As I didn’t choose anything, I decided to build my own hardware: a multicolored monome clone.

# Korg DS-10 demo video – YouTube user Denkitribe shows a "very serious virtual analog synth".

# Open Source GigaStudio Petition: Why It’s Unlikely – Peter Kirn on the future of GigaStudio now that TASCAM put everything giga in their legacy archive.

# vvvv Adds Music Features; Get Your Synesthesia Patching On, Free on Windows – vvvv, the free-for-non-commercial-use patching environment on Windows, already has a cult following among visualists. Now, it’s looking more interesting for music, too, with the 4.0 beta 17 release.

Short links for March 11th, 2008

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on March 11th, 2008:

Furby Gurdy!
Furby Gurdy! Find more cool circuit bent instruments on David Cranmer‘s website.
  • Bloxes – Bloxes are building blocks made of interlocking pieces of corrugated cardboard, folded together. Their unique shape and structure make them exceptionally strong and lightweight — you could build yourself a platform to stand on, and then pick it up and move it wherever you need to.
  • This is your Brain on Jazz: Researchers use MRI to study spontaneity, creativity – A pair of Johns Hopkins and government scientists have discovered that when jazz musicians improvise, their brains turn off areas linked to self-censoring and inhibition, and turn on those that let self-expression flow.
  • Chopper Tremolo Effect – Simple and low quality circuit (built it in about an hour), based on a simple NAND oscillator from an LED Chaser circuit.
  • 35 Fantastic HDR Pictures – Applied carefully, High Dynamic Range-technique (HDR) can create incredibly beautiful pictures which blur our sense of the difference between reality and illusion.

Short links for October 24th, 2007

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on October 24th, 2007:

Japanese Hiding Place (photo by Torin Boyd/Polaris)
Can you spot where the person is hiding? Hilarious and sad at the same time…
  • Gmail IMAP – Gmail now supports IMAP!
  • PlusDeck – Cassette-to-MP3 converter – Still have old cassette tapes worth saving? You can easily convert them to digital formats with plusdeckEX and plusdeck2c. (or just don’t be lazy and hook up your old cassette player to your computer…)
  • Chris Gilmour – Beautiful cardboard sculptures, including a typewriter, 12 speed bicycles, a grand piano, a coffee machine, and a life size car.

Shigeru Ban’s Cardboard Bridge

Related: , , , , Posted in random posts on Aug 09, 2007 - comment 0 comments

Tokyo/Paris-based architect, Shigeru Ban, has taken cardboard design to a new level. He recently constructed a bridge that spans across the Gardon River in southern France.

Shigeru Ban in front of his Cardboard Bridge
Shigeru Ban in front of his Cardboard Bridge

The structure is made primarily from cardboard tubes (exactly 281), with the steps constructed from recycled paper and plastic. This modern day marvel in the 3 Rs lies just down the way from an ancient roman stone bridge–an interesting juxtaposition between the use of materials in ancient and modern-day constructions. And surprisingly enough, the bridge can hold up to 20 people.

Link via core77