Results for CDM

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'CDM'.

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Short links for March 18th, 2010

Philips SAA-1099

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Phillips SAA-1099 Sample Pack (Copyright-free and License-free)

A new pack of samples by Sebastian Tomczak:

I have made a copyright-free and license-free sample pack of the Phillips SAA-1099 sound generator chip. It is a very straightforward sample pack, consisting of 96 pitched samples and 16 noise samples, across a range of frequencies. These samples have been recorded from hardware. The audio output stage of the sound chip has not been filtered.

Sebastian has also announced a music contest:

It's time to get your chipmusic on! This is your chance to win a SEGA Master System MIDI Interface. Be the coolest musician in your town with this brand new tool that lets you control the sound chip in your SEGA Master System with MIDI data.

More information: SEGA Music Competition: Win A SEGA Master System MIDI Interface!

# [ INCREDIBOX ] presents [ THE INCREDIBLE POLO ] – Lovely online application that offers you to discover the musical universe of "The Incredible Polo", handling a range of "human beat-box" sounds created by the artist.

# Jim Reekes, The Man Behind Mac Sound

From Create Digital Music:

The legend of the early sounds of the Mac remains, apparently, an alluring one. Here, Jim Reekes talks to a Dutch documentary crew (though in English) about his thought process in designing sounds for the Mac, including the famous Mac startup sound.

# Top 10 Free Pro Tools RTAS Plugins

Jon at Audio Geek Zine lists his top 10 free RTAS plug-ins for Pro Tools.

I see this topic come up a lot, “what are the best free rtas plugins?” I’ve answered the question so many times but I’ve never addressed it on the site.<br />
Below is my list of 10 (in no particular order) free 3rd party RTAS plugins I think everyone should have on their system. There are many more out there but these are the ones I use on a regular basis, they are useful and are stable.

Livid Block

# New Block Construction

Livid Instruments improves its Block:

Improving on a design and sharing the results with our users is always at the top of our list at Livid. The Block controller has been a great success and we have just made some minor design changes to make it even better. Originally milled from a solid block of wood, the square body with thin bottom has had its challenges, mostly warping and cupping. We have experienced a bit higher reject rate for bodies at the shop before they were built then we would like. Thus, the up and coming stash of rejected bodies in the Livid Graveyard that were never meant to be!

# Waveformless: 5 Ways of Emulating Vintage Samplers

Mirage DSK

Tom Shear on how to emulate vintage samplers:

When sampling technology finally became accessible to mere mortals and not just uber-rich Fairlight and Synclavier enthusiasts, the race was on to increase fidelity and leave behind the limitations of those first 8-bit samplers. Bit depth and sampling rates increased and memory capacity expanded until the average sampled sound was indistinguishable from the same sound recorded on a CD.

But sure enough, after many years of enjoying the pristine sound quality of the new sampling technology, musicians began to explore and exploit the limitations of the old school samplers. Suddenly the grain of low bit-rate samples and the metallic grit of aliasing is very much in style. So how can you emulate the sonic artifacts of some of the long forgotten vintage samplers? I'm glad you asked…

# Intello – Better Demo of first version (YouTube)

This is the plugin I am currently working on. It's called "Intello". Basically it's a glitch producing plugin and in this first short demo I'm showing you one of the 5 planned glitching modes. The plugin will be controllable by an iPhone application from a listening audience. So the listeners can interact with a performer.

More information: www.zettt.de

# Dan303: Audiotool BETA [Sneak peak]

Dan writes:

I receved an email last night from the good people at audiotool. For those of you that dont know audiotool is a browser based music production platform that features emulations of the classic drum machines and bassline synth origanally made by roland. Along with the drum machines and bass line synthesiser, the audiotool also features emulations of guitar effects. The email I receved contained a link to test the BETA version of audiotool 1.0 [codename: Firestarter]. The BETA version of the audio tool has lots of intresting new freatures, such as a timeline, piano roll, automation and a new synthesiser.

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Short links for February 26th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Neurosonics Live (Vimeo)

Chris Cairns of Neurosonics Audiomedical Labs Inc. posted another Neurosonics video, the Holographic Drumkit and Turntables test.


DRUMS: WILL CLARK, TURNTABLES: JFB, HEADS: BEARDYMAN

# GroovePacks Free Stuff

GroovePacks has released a new sampler freebie featuring 10 Sampler instruments (Live 8 and Sampler required).

The instruments were made using samples from our Foundation 1 & 2 sample packs, and also some waveforms from the default Ableton library. Open the info view to see additional information on each rack. You get some great sounding sfx, bass, pad and rhythmic sounds. Install instructions are on the zip file. Enjoy!

# OTO machines – Biscuit

Hardware unit with real 8-bit A/D and D/A converters, true analog multimode filter with resonance control, an FX section with Waveshaper, Delay, Pitch Shifter and Step Filter, and more…

OTO Biscuit
OTO Biscuit

Add depth, texture and organic behavior to synths, basslines, drum machines and virtual sounds from computers with BISCUIT !

By using 8-bit converters, digital processing and analog resonant filters, Biscuit opens up a wide range of sounds from harsh distortion, digital and aliasing artifacts to warm and fat 8-bit sounds.

Producers, deejays, musicians and sound lovers can use BISCUIT to extend their sound creation possi- bilities.
BISCUIT will find its place in studios, on stages or even in clubs.

via CDM, where you can also find an interview with creator Denis Cazajeux.

# SNOOKY001 DRUMKIT « timothyJ:

Free drumkit by Timothy Preut:

new drumkit called SNOOKY001. It is a combo of some kinda retro meets grimey meets elctronic. Have fun using these sounds.

Drumaxx & Ableton @ ModulateThis!

# Image Line Drumaxx Tutorial – Routing Pad Output to Separate Audio Tracks in Ableton Live

Mark Mosher posted a tutorial on how to route pad output of Image-Line's Drumaxx percussion synth to separate audio tracks in Ableton Live.

Image Line has just released a new Percussion Modeling Instrument called Drumaxx made by Maxx Claster. Drumaxx includes 130 drumkits, 900 drum patches, 200 drum patterns. If you use Sawer, Sakura, Morphine, Poizone, or Toxic Biohazard instruments, then you are familiar with Maxx’s work.

Image Line is offering Drumaxx as a “name your price” download for limited until March 31st,2010 with a minimum price of $13 USD with $1 going to support Haiti earthquake victims. With a deal like this I thought it was a “no brainer” so I picked it up.

One of the coolest features is that each of the 16 physically modeled drums can be routed to individual tracks within your host so you can add additional effects. Below I’ll show you how to set this up on Ableton Live.

# Studio Wormbone

Trevor Dutton wrote in to let us know that he’s hiring out the services of his electronic music studio.

Studio Wormbone is a compact and efficient state of the art recording and production facility located in a quiet forest setting just outside the Emerald City of Seattle.

Owned and managed by sound designer/producer Trevor Dutton, Wormbone Studio specializes in all aspects of electronic music, sound design, and cutting edge audio production.

Trevor has also released a number of sample packs, now available from Producer Loops.

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Music for Our Future: Free 13-track compilation inspired by SyFy’s Caprica

Music for Our Future

Music for Our Future is a special compilation inspired by the SyFy original series, Caprica.

Peter Kirn writes:

Working with music production today is a bit like science fiction. It’s fitting that visions of technology’s promise, menace, and humanity would inspire electronic music.

Create Digital Music, XLR8R, and Pitchfork got to join together with TV network SyFy to curate a free, 13-track compilation of “Music for Our Future.” Inspired by the world of SyFy’s new TV series Caprica, which is set just before the recently-concluded Battlestar Galactica, this is science fiction as the familiar. It’s the near future, not simply fantasy.

The full compilation is available to download for free, exclusively at: http://www.xlr8r.com/musicforourfuture

The compilation includes tracks by Lusine, Willits & Sakamoto, The Field, Richard Devine, and more. Also features some exclusive material by White Rainbows, Nice Nice, and CDM’s Peter Kirn, who also talks to some of the artists to find out what inspired them and which techniques were used for these tracks.

More information: Music for Our Future / Create Digital Music

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Short links for December 22nd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Make: Online : Open source hardware 2009

Make’s definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2009.

Make:Online open source hardware 2009

Welcome to definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2009. First up – What is open source hardware? These are projects in which the creators have decided to completely publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files to recreate the hardware – they also allow any use, including commercial. Similar to open source software like Linux, but this hardware centric.

Each year we do a guide to all open source hardware and this year there are over 125 unique projects/kits in 19 categories, up from about 60 in 2008, more than doubling the projects out there! – it’s incredible! Many are familiar with Arduino (shipping over 100,000 units, estimated) but there are many other projects just as exciting and filled with amazing communities – we think we’ve captured nearly all of them in this list. Some of these projects and kits are available from MAKE others from the makers themselves or other hardware manufacturers – but since it’s open source hardware you can make any of these yourself, start a business, everything is available, that’s the point.

# fridgebuzzz electronics MK1 MIDI controller

fridgebuzzz MK1

The MK1 prototype is a user programmable midi controller featuring 32 LED pushbutton switches and 6 touch sensitive copper plate switches.

# satrap activ portable analog synthesizer (YouTube)

Flo Kaufmann shows his “satrap activ” portable analog synthesizer made out of a vacuum cleaner.

It contains 2 cmos based VCO’s , a Moog ladder filter, a 555 based ADSR, a cmos based 8 step sequencer, a PIC based vc to midi interface and a PIC based auto trigger unit. There are 4 tunable knobs on top, mostly to play base lines, and 2 conductable wires, which act as voltage dividers to generate variable tones. the wires do not vibrate. so it is not a cord instrument. satrap activ can also control other synthesizers either by midi or cv/gate interface.

Mark Mosher's Audio Cubes

# Percussa Audio Cubes: Lights & Tangible Interface with Ableton Live and Alchemy

Mark Mosher writes about his Audio Cubes:

I recently added Percussa AudioCubes to my studio and performance rig.

While I’m planning a longer post offering an overview of how AudioCubes work, this is a quick post to mention two applications of AudioCube technology I’ve been experimenting with.

# Larry Cotton’s MIDI Marimba

Larry Cotton’s 3-octave “player marimba” was featured in MAKE, Volume 4. Larry added two MD24 MIDI Decoders and the marimba can now be controlled by any MIDI sequencer or keyboard.

L2Ork (image by CDM)

# An Orchestra of Linux Laptops, and How to Make Your Own Laptop Instrument

Peter Kirn @ Create Digital Music:

For a generation of musicians of nearly every genre, the laptop has become an instrument. It’s easy to take for granted, but the rise of the computer for music has been remarkable. Less than twenty years ago, real-time digital synthesis and audio processing was the domain of expensive, specialized workstations. Now, $700 per seat can buy you a full-blown musical rig, with the computer hardware, gestural input courtesy the Nintendo Wii controller, and even a DIY speaker made from IKEA salad bowls. The next challenge is to make this setup as flexible and reliable as possible. Enter Linux.

Marblephone

# Marblephone

g000ze @ Let's Make Robots writes:

Inspired by Animusic's bodacious films, I was wondering whether a music robot in a much more simple way would be possible to make. Here is what my little boys and I created.

Still unfinished, but already working. Thank you Animusic for activating my imagination building the music machine that I am calling Marblephone.

# Line 6 JM4 Looper Review (with Video)

Joe Glider of Home Studio Corner has a reivew of the Line 6 JM4 Looper pedal:

I’ve always been absolutely fascinated with looper pedals. Any time an artist uses one in a performance, I’m spellbound. As soon as you introduce a looper pedal into your setup, suddenly all the rules change. You’re no longer a solo performer, you’re an entire ensemble. It’s like you brought a recording studio right on stage with you, and now you’re doing an overdub session for all of us to see. Fascinating.

Needless to say, I’ve wanted a looper pedal for years. Thanks to the good folks at Line 6, now I have one!* What I love about the JM4 is that it’s not JUST a looper. It’s an entire guitar workstation. It has both amp modeling and three different selectable effects.

PongThatBeat! (Vimeo)

PingPong sequencer made with max/msp and processing.

# Langjokull, Snaefellsjokull, Solheimajokull – Three glacier ice records, played until they melt.

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Short links for December 1st, 2009

Lab3 Arduino Sine wave Generator

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Arduino Sine wave Generator using the DDS Method

From Lab3:

Here we describe how to generate sine waves with an Arduino board in a very accurate way . Almost no additional hardware is required. The frequency range reaches form zero to 16 KHz with a resolution of a millionth part of one Hertz ! Distortions can be kept less than one percent on frequencies up to 3 KHz. This technique is not only useful for music and sound generation another range of application is test equipment or measurement instrumentation. Also in telecommunication the DDS Method is useful for instance in frequency of phase modulation (FSK PSK).

# ningear – This eBay seller is listing lots of Nine Inch Nails gear from their last tour. Want a piece of NiN? Get it now on eBay!

# Schipmann Music out of business Via Matrixsynth

Dear customers!

We are finishing our business. These are the very last units of “ebbe und flut” ever!! We are thankful for all our satisfied customers. We will be there for you in support and service in that time after this sale.

Yours sincerely,
Carsten Schippmann (CEO)

Schipmann ebbe und flut MKII
Last ebbe und flut MKII units going for 999 EUR (normal price: 1498,21 EUR per unit) Tempting…

# Gruss Loops – Volume VII is here!

Ryan writes:

I’m happy to announce that the wait is finally over. Gruss Loops Volume VII is now available! With some major studio upgrades at Gruss Headquarters over the past month, I think you’ll be able to hear the enriched sonic textures that only a few thousand dollars made out to Steve Jobs can bring. If you put your mouth against the speakers, you might even be able to taste it.

# 5 Years of CDM NYC Party: Beats + Baile + Open Bar + Laptops + Twitter Twister

CDM love by onetonnemusic

Time flies when you’re having fun. Congratulations to Peter Kirn and CDM.

Pete writes:

Link love, chip love, software love, music love – Create Digital Music is celebrating five years, and it’s time to spread some of the love back to you here in New York City.

Wednesday night, we’ll be celebrating five years made possible by our incredible readers with a big party at Love Nightclub in Manhattan.

# Waveformless: Free Sample Friday: Vocoded Drums

Tom writes:

Most of my American readers probably have today off, but regardless, the weekend is almost here! So here's a small set of 16 drum sounds sent through a vocoder for your downloading enjoyment… All samples are 24-bit/44.1k.

little-scale Novation Laundpad

# little-scale Novation Launchpad – Sebastian uses Max/MSP to create a linear sequencer, ripple sequencer and waveform editor for the Novation Launchpad.

Today I made a simple ripple-based sequencer for the Novation Launchpad. The idea is simple. By pressing a grid button, a yellow, square ripple is created that emanates from the point that was touched. By holding down a modifier button and pressing a grid button, static, red points are created. Each red point represents a musical note. Whenever a given yellow ripple intersects (touches) a red point, the sequencer plays a note.

# Endless loop: A brief history of chiptunes

By Kevin Driscoll, Joshua Diaz. The abstract:

Chiptune refers to a collection of related music production and performance practices sharing a history with video game soundtracks. The evolution of early chiptune music tells an alternate narrative about the hardware, software, and social practices of personal computing in the 1980s and 1990s. By digging into the interviews, text files, and dispersed ephemera that have made their way to the Web, we identify some of the common folk-historical threads among the commercial, noncommercial, and ambiguously commercial producers of chiptunes with an eye toward the present-day confusion surrounding the term chiptune. Using the language of affordances and constraints, we hope to avoid a technocratic view of the inventive and creative but nevertheless highly technical process of creating music on computer game hardware.

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Short links for October 23rd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Awesome collection of DIY video-glitch hardware

From Make: Online:

The "tools" section of media artist Karl Klomp's website documents an impressive amount of bent, hacked and homebrew hardware for video manipulation. Devices such as the Failter (seen above) series go through a number of incarnations while Karl experiments with different hardware and uncovers its glitch-ability. The retro-simple feel of the enclosures give give it all a nicely 'scientific' almost medical feel.

# Waveformless: Free Sample Friday: SH-101 Percussion

Tom Shear shares another batch of lovely samples.

It's the weekend! Woohoo! Here to start your weekend off right are 20 synth percussion sounds from my Novamodded Roland SH-101 as 24-bit/44.1k WAV files. Enjoy!

# MPC2500 Gutted & Deconstructed (Vimeo) via Crate Kings

Hopefully most Akai owners will never have to witness their beloved music machine being gutted like this MPC2500 was. It’s not exactly pretty sight, but fascinating stuff for those that have been curious about the innards of a sampler/sequencer/drum machine.

# Avid Announces Third Quarter 2009 Results

Some interesting numbers from Avid’s financial department:

Avid® (NASDAQ: AVID) today reported revenues of $153.7 million for the three-month period ended September 30, 2009, compared to $217.1 million for the same period in 2008. The GAAP net loss for the quarter was $16.2 million, or $.43 per share, compared to a GAAP net loss of $66.4 million, or $1.80 per share, in the third quarter of 2008. The third quarter 2008 results included a non-cash impairment charge of $51.3 million or $1.39 per share.

The GAAP net loss for the third quarter of 2009 included amortization of intangibles, stock-based compensation, restructuring charges, loss on asset sales and related tax adjustments, collectively totaling $17.0 million. Excluding these items, the non-GAAP net income was $787 thousand for the third quarter, or $.02 per share.

# 279 / nanopedal via CDM

Marcus Fischer of dust breeding turned a Korg nanoKEY into a foot controller.

Marcus Fisher nanopedal

Marcus writes:

i’ve been wanting a compact usb midi foot pedal for a long time. i built one out of a usb number pad last year but it was less than ideal. tonight i popped all of the keys but five off of my korg nanokey in order to see how it would work as a pedal. it turned out that it worked really well. i cut some small pieces of plywood out to raise the key height and some scrap plexiglass to cover up the missing keys. a little spray paint and double stick tape and it was all finished.

i think it turned out pretty well. not bad for a cheap keyboard and scrap materials.

# The Stretta Procedure: Lego Foosball

Matthew Davidson made a Lego Fußball table for his son.

My son is really attracted to foosball tables, and, if I'm honest, I'd have to say I am too. I considered the idea of buying a small, tabletop unit, but I was unsure how much use it'd see. I was afraid it might become one of those things you play with for a bit, then collect dust. Once again, I see a solution in the form of Lego.

Korg DS-10 by sushipop @ Flickr

# Going Mobile: Nintendo DS-10 Comes to North America

Peter Kirn @ CDM writes:

Fans of the Nintendo DS in North America, the Korg DS-10 Plus synthesizer for Big N’s game system is now coming to your side of the Pacific Ocean. (That also bodes well, I think, for other parts of the world.) The DS-10 I think really deserves some credit for making a straight-up music title a hit on gaming platforms, and its success certainly surpassed my own expectations. It’s not a game, it’s not an interactive experience, it’s not a music game – it’s actually a synth and music workstation that happens to run on a game platform. The DS-10 Plus beefs up the original’s features, though it now has a commercially-available rival in the form of Rockstar’s Beaterator for PSP.

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CDM Free Exclusive Ableton Operator Download: “Less Cowbell” 808 Sounds

Ableton Operator (Create Digital Music)

Create Digital Music has released Less Cowbell, a free patch for Ableton Operator by Francis Preve.

Peter Kirn writes:

The simple interface of Ableton’s Operator belies some truly lovely soundmaking capabilities. Our friend Francis Preve, a principle Ableton sound designer who has contributed hundreds of presets since 2004, has a new single out that makes use of some of those sonic possibilities, combining Operator with juicy spectral and granular effects in Live 7. As a gift to Ableton users on CDM, he’s giving us both the rack he used and some tips on squeezing noise out of the Ableton instrument.

You will need a copy of Operator (or demo version) to use this patch.

Visit Create Digital Music for more on Francis Preve and his Hasown / Less Cowbell EP.

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