Syntone launches Bongos, Timbales & Xylofun for Kontakt + Piano Impacts freebie

Syntone has launched with the release of three percussion instrument libraries for Native Instruments: Bongos, Timbales and Xylofun.

Bongos

Syntone Bongos

This library is, as the name implies, a set of bongos we deeply sampled. A decent multitude of hits and a good supply of single and looped scrapes await the proud owner of this popular percussion instrument.

One hot day of Australian summer found us sampling these bongos. Battling the weather (it was REALLY hot), we eventually achieved the 1000+ samples we needed to create a product we were happy with.

Bongos features

  • 12 round robins for the hits.
  • 4 round robin for the scrapes.
  • 2 round robin for the looped scrapes.
  • Up to 8 velocity layers for the hits.
  • 1312 samples.
  • 48kHz/24-bit quality.
  • 169MB (91MB compressed).

Bongos costs $15 AUD.

Timbales

Syntone Timbales

The Timbales is a sample library consisting of a COWBELL and some other drums that make up the timbales.

We figured sampling just the cowbell alone would be counterproductive, so decided to sample the rest of the set, with 8 round robin, 8 velocity layers and custom scripting to keep each rhythm you create fresh and devoid of monotony.

Timbales features

  • 8 round robin.
  • 8 velocity layers.
  • 48kHz/24-bit quality.
  • 85.5MB (40MB compressed).

Timbales costs $10 AUD.

Xylofun

Syntone Xylophone

The Xylofun is a children’s xylophone we’ve meticulously sampled. It might be a child’s toy, but we can all still have a lot of fun with it!

The Xylofun was our first concept for a sample library. Recording was easy, but the sample-making was not. Turns out that tuning isn’t that important in toys for children. Thankfully, we’ve tuned it properly, sampled with 8 round robin and 8 velocity layers, created some hybrid variants and glued it all together with custom scripting, so now it won’t make you cringe when you hit an off-note.

Xylofun features

  • 8 velocity layers for the clean instrument.
  • 8 round robin with optional neighbour borrowing (potential total of 24RR).
  • 2 clean and 4 hybrid instruments.
  • 48kHz/24-bit quality.
  • 740MB(431MB compressed).

Xylofun costs $25 AUD.

Syntone Piano Impacts

Syntone is also offering a free version of the upcoming Piano Impacts library.

Slapping pianos is nothing new; the likes of George Crumb and Henry Cowell were doing it when most of us weren’t even born yet.

We had a piano. We had things to hit it with. Put two and two together and you get this lovely little library.

The free version is available to Syntone Facebook fans. It is limited to 1 velocity layer and does not include the arp available in the full version.

All Syntone virtual instrument libraries require Kontakt 4.2.4+ full version.

More information: Syntone

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VI Labs releases True Cowbells free sample library

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VI Labs True Cowbells

VI Labs has announced True Cowbells, a free sound library featuring the sounds of three cowbells.

What do you do after you create one of the most comprehensive and well received virtual piano plug-ins on the market? You get to work.

Introducing True Cowbells. The most comprehensive Cowbell plug-in ever developed. We sampled three of the most popular cowbells on the market using different microphones. Choose close-up hits, the perspective from the player, or really explore the studio space with the room sound. You can even choose a “mix” position just like in (True Keys Pianos) to get a blend of all three microphone positions we recorded.

True Cowbells for UVI Workstation & MachFive is available as a free download.

More information: VI Labs / True Cowbells

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Short links for September 10th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on September 10th, 2008:

minitek 2008

# minitek electronic music festival

here it finally is: new york’s electronic music + innovation festival! minitek is going to be slightly different from other festivals you know, even very different at times.

first of all because the festival combines two aspects: electronic music and innovation. while it seems pretty straight forward at first, you’ll see soon that we’re going to explore innovation not only in respect to music but also to other forms of art, science and technology.

Electronic music talents from around the world, a range of experimental art and technology installations, new consumer technologies that have never been applied in a festival context – such as RFID wristbands, and lots more.

Also check here and let Peter Kirn know Who Do You Want Interviewed At Minitek?

# More Cowbell.DJ – More Cowbell is the online spin off of the Saturday Night Live special featuring Will Ferrell as Gene Frenkle, the cowbell player, and Christopher Walken as the music producer, Bruce Dickenson. More Cowbell.dj allows you to cowbell any song you want and even add some Walken to the mix. I got a fever and the only prescription is cowbell.

# Making Music with the Arduino: Wires, Solder, and Sound Round-Up

Michael Una writes:

I received my Arduino Diecemila in the mail last week and have started to experiment with using it to synthesize audio and video. I’m not very experienced with programming microcontrollers, so I’ve been doing a lot of research to see what’s out there, and it’s greatly encouraging to see that people are taking this little kit in fun directions.

# Pipe Organ Chair – This is a pipe organ chair that plays a tune when you sit down (insert your musical furniture joke here).

# Advanced Mega-Round-Up: Going Microtonal with Synths

Peter Kirn writes:

Digital software instruments give you opportunities to explore new sounds and timbres, so why not add tuning to the list? Kore@CDM contributor and sound designer Eoin Rossney helps us navigate the potentially intimidating world of microtuning. Microtonal sound simply refers, generally, to tunings beyond the now-standard 12-Tone Equal Temperament we find on modern pianos. First off, microtuning doesn’t have to sound dissonant or “out of tune” – like other choices with synthesis, it can simply give you some new sonic abilities. Native Instruments’ synths are well-suited to the task, as many having tuning capabilities built-in. If you’re using plug-ins to assist your microtonal voyage, Kore is a natural with its plug-in hosting capabilities. But the most important thing is just to dive in somewhere and see what happens – with no physical instrument to retune, it’s something anyone can do.

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