Results for Create Digital Music

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'Create Digital Music'.

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Short links for April 1st, 2011

Some interesting things I found recently:

# AnalogTelePhonographer

Christopher Locke made an Analog Tele-Phonographer, a sound amplifier for his cell phone/portable music player.

I made it from a broken trumpet and a fistful of scrap metal. The unit uses no external power or batteries, has no moving parts, and is entirely self-contained.

More info: Heartless Machine

# Music from Numbers: An Eclectic, Free (CC) Compilation of Numbers Station-Inspired Tracks

Peter Kirn writes:

Number Stations Part 2

Number stations, making their appearance in the post-war radio landscape, were shortwave radio stations of streams of symbols, mysterious to their listeners and apparently code.

Here, the idea of lost and indecipherable broadcasts inspires a wonderfully-varied collection of reflective artists, in a free, Creative-Commons licensed compilation by PublicSpaces Lab. That Barcelona-based netlabel has been reliably curating some of the smartest, most forward-thinking music collections around. This time, the artists are impressive not only in their output but in their range of backgrounds and extra-musical sources of inspiration.

# Antique Light Bulb Organ – MIDI/OSC Controlled

Instructables user capricorn1 shows how to create your own antique light bulb organ to add nostalgic ambiance to any midi instrument.

Antique Light Bulb Organ

12 light bulbs correspond to the 12 notes in an octave (minus the octave note). The rectangular box unfolds to position the light bulbs vertically for display, while at the same time providing a platform for the keyboard in use. Playing a note on the keyboard directly via midi, or through the usb port illuminates the light bulb for a particular key. Releasing the note, releases the key. Pedal presses are also recognized and keep the bulb maintained. The bulbs can be controlled without a computer by using the front mounted midi port, or via computer which allows for remote control via midi or osc messages.

# Dan303: Free hand played percussion loops

Dan Weatherall has posted a new sample pack featuring 10 hand played percussion loops in .wav format.

I'm not saying I'm the best percussionist in the world but I played these percussion loops myself.
These loops are an ideal way to give your track a little bit of human feeling.

All loops are played at 120 bpm.

# Circles and Euclidian Rhythms: Off the Grid, a Few Music Makers That Go Round and Round

Peter Kirn rounds up some music making tools that take the circular approach.

Create Digital Music

There’s no reason apart from the printed score to assume music has to be divided into grids laid on rectangles. Even the “piano roll” as a concept began as just that – a roll. Cycles the world around, from a mechanical clock to Indonesian gamelan, can be thought of in circles.

Imagine an alternate universe in which Raymond Scott’s circle machine – a great, mechanical disc capable of sequencing sounds – became the dominant paradigm. We might have circles everywhere, in place of left-to-right timelines now common in media software. Regardless, it’s very likely Scott’s invention inspired Bob Moog’s own modular sequencers; it was almost certainly the young Moog’s exposure to the inventions in Scott’s basement that prompted that inventor to go into the electronic music business, thus setting the course for music technology as we know it.

# aurex › Launchpad Sequencers

Get more out of your Launchpad + Ableton combination.

The aurex sequencers for the Novation Launchpad are devices and tools to compose, sequence, alter and remix music within Ableton Live. You don't need M4L / Bome / … to use them, just make sure you have a Launchpad and Live 8.1.3 or higher.

# Cry Baby: The Pedal That Rocks The World on Vimeo

Cry Baby: The Pedal That Rocks The World tells the story of the wah wah effect pedal, from its invention in 1966 to the present day.

# Waveformless: Free Sample Friday

Some recent goodies Tom posted about on his blog:

  • Korg Radias samples from Waveformless reader Psyche Poppet.
  • A small selection of free one shot samples from Studio Wormbone’ Animal Robotix release is available from Producer Loops.
  • Alchemy Snares 02: ten snare sounds built, destroyed, mangled, and layered in Camel Audio’s Alchemy.
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Short links for January 11th, 2011

Some interesting things I found recently:

# OP-1, NAMM 2011

Teenage Engineering: If you're at NAMM, please come by our booth, we'll be showing alot of new crazy features!

# BLEEP – The Top 100 Tracks of 2010

The Top 100 Tracks Of 2010 features 100 MP3s in 320 kbps. Over 9 hours of music, over 1.2 GB, available to purchase until February 10th 2011, priced at £30 / $50 / €35

# Open Thread: What is Virtuosity on a Drum Machine?

Peter Kirn at Create Digital Music:

Electronic music has always had a funny relationship with musicianship. It isn’t playing a traditional instrument; instead, it lies somewhere between instrumentalism and composition, between playing and conducting. Sometimes, that scale is tipped away from virtuosity of any kind.

But lately, I’ve had an increasing number of conversations with people who make the tools with which we make music about what this all means. I’ll be able to share one of those conversations in a bit, but I’m curious to hear what readers think.

Jeff Mills comes to mind. He doesn’t just DJ with three decks, he also uses a TR-909 in his live sets.

# Radium Audio Labs

Radium Audio Labs is a blog with some interesting sound design articles on things like frozen contact mics, recording guns, coil pickup and printer recordings, and more.

Explorative adventures in sound – Part of Radium Audio, a leading music and sound design company based in London. We work with agencies, cg & animation houses, digital agencies, game developers, brands and manufacturers.

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Short links for December 27th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Tyrell N6 Alpha

u-he Tyrell N6 alpha
u-he Tyrell N6 alpha

Urs Heckmann of u-he has released an alpha version of Tyrell N6, a free synthesizer plug-in created as part of the TYRELL project (check CDM for more info).

The Tyrell N6 alpha for PC and Mac (VST/AU) is available to download for registered Amazona users (registration is free, click here).

# Free DrumLoops and BassLine samples

More free samples by Dan303:

This pack contains a selection of loops perfect for the creation minimal, acid and techno music (Or whatever you want really).

In the pack: 8 303 loops (Square), 8 303 loops (Saw), 8 303 loops (Dist), 8 909 loops, 8 808 loops, 8 Acid bass loops. All the musical parts are in Am and the tempo of all the samples are at 120bpm. All the loops and samples in this pack are free to use in whatever project you want.

Mark Mosher Crystal Patch Sharing

# Sharing Patches and A/B Audio Comparison Between Green Oaks Crystal Desktop Synthesizer on Windows and Crystal XT for iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch

Mark Mosher takes Green Oak’s Crystal for a spin on both the desktop and iOS, and shows how to share patches between both synths in a useful “Patch Sharing Step-by-Step”.

These instructions are in an edit of the original instructions at the bottom of this page. Green Oak’s instructions are accurate but assume you know your way around iTunes and Crystal so there are some gotchas. I’ve added some more detailed notes and steps (in red) to help fill in the gaps. Even if you only want to transfer patches from desktop to mobile, I recommend you go through steps 1-3 anyway so you’ll have a bank with the proper name an in the proper format.

tips for your os x daw

Tips from Enennu:

a few very useful workarounds I’ve developed for my daw, so you probably won’t find them anywhere else

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Short links for December 15th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Nintendo NES Does MIDI and Live Music, Integrated into Your Studio

Peter Kirn at Create Digital Music:

Retro chip music appeal and the occasional Super Mario Bros. game aside, you probably think of the Nintendo NES and Famicom system as something collecting dust at garage sales. You probably don’t think of this NES running as a self-contained music production workstation, syncing to MIDI and Android, or exploiting new software for producing elaborate musical sequences, drum and bass lines. Think again.

What might to outsiders seem like the nostalgic draw of video music has become something else entirely – the NES is taking its place as a serious, studio synth.

Below a video of NES tracker Pulsar.

# Free Max for Live devices

Christian Kleine has released a number of Max for Live devices, including timestretching, delay, extreme chorus, spring reverb, ringmod, drum synth, comb filters, audio recorder and more.

The devices are available at no cost. Donations are welcome.

# OpenKinect – Keyboard Anywhere

Made possible by libfreenect (http://openkinect.org) and coded in python.

# little-scale: NanoKontrol As Simple Waveform Editor

Sebastian Tomczak writes:

I made a basic Max/MSP patch that allows one to use the Korg NanoKontrol MIDI controller as a periodic waveform editor. Each of the first eight faders controls a point along a periodic waveform. The ninth fader controls the frequency of the waveform.

# refreq

Daniel Feles writes:

refreq is a really customable music player. I mean really. You can load music files into refreq, but also images (bitmaps, imgs, pngs). When you load a song, first the program analyzes the track, then it draws its frequency spectrum. After tracking, you can generate the spectral image / bitmap back into music.

At this point, it's getting really interesting. After you have the image of the track, how you want to play it depends on you, You can play with the timeline, to play the sound from an other aspect. You can see where exactly the notes are, but the harmonies are also really visible. You can rotate the player, then the notes will be the same, but the harmonies will be changing

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U-He to create Amazona’s Tyrell as software synthesizer

Create Digital Music reports that Urs of u-he will be developing the “Tyrell – N6″, a software synthesizer based on Amazona’s Tyrell.

Tyrell is the result of some 10.000 Amazona.de readers who in a number of surveys and articles in various forums shared their thoughts about what a polyphonic, affordable analog synthesizer should look like. About one year later the concept is worked out as a proper “virtual” analog synth.

Amazona Tyrell
Amazona Tyrell, amazing rendered model by Stephan Gries (click for full shot and white version)

Amazon’s Peter Grandl writes:

our project TYRELL will become reality. :-) ))
First as a Software Synthesizer, programmed by U-He (from the inventors of ZEBRA 2) and hopefully later as an analog hardware device.

Urs Heckman (see picture) is working on a Synth-project called DIVA. One part of the project is developing a module which is based on the ROLAND Juno 60. Exactly this synth was also the base for the AMAZONA.de Reader-Survey. Now, Urs will bring both ideas together and will create TYRELL – N6 as the first TYRELL Clone.

Since the last letter we have been contacted by three companies from Europe and China. Each of these companies has expressed interest to realize TYRELL.

PS: BTW – the Software Version of U-He will be free of charge for amazona.de readers. We expected a beta-version before Christmas this year!!

More information: Create Digital Music / u-he

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Create Digital Music launches MeeBlip, hackable digital synthesizer

MeeBlip

Create Digital Music has introduced the MeeBlip, a digital MIDI mono synthesizer designed by James Grahame of Reflex Audio and Retro Thing.

It’s designed to be affordable, hackable, and most of all, playable. It’s an open source hardware instrument, but it isn’t just for hackers. You can unpack it, do some very basic assembly of the complete kit, and be making sounds from a MIDI keyboard or other controller within minutes.

And if you are interested in hacking it, from simple modifications to reprogramming the sound, we’ll be putting up lots of resources that help you learn how to do that. That said, the reason we’re excited to have our own MeeBlips is simple: we have fun playing them.

MeeBlip features

  • Out of the box, a monophonic virtual analog synth.
  • Eight user-definable knobs and sixteen slide switches, for hands-on control with the immediacy of a classic monosynth.
  • Tasty digital synth sounds.
  • Use it as-is, or use the source code to remap controls or completely redefine the instrument’s architecture.
  • Available ready for simple, solder-free assembly with a case, or as a kit, all on a single board. Build your own, or make a different project with the MeeBlip sound engine.
  • 8-bit digital brain.
  • MIDI input.
  • 4-pole active low-pass antialising filter.
  • Open source hardware. Modify anything, buy some kits and sell your own builds, or make new projects.
  • Complete kits ship with a custom front panel illustrated by Nathanael Jeanneret.

A MeeBlip Quick Build Kit (includes an assembled board, case, and everything you need – no soldering required) ships internationally for $129 USD. A full board kit and bare PC board (with programmed MCU and DAC) are also available at $79 and $39 USD respectively.

More information: MeeBlip

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Short links for October 12th, 2010

Moog Filtatron (image by Create Digital Music)

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Exclusive Leak: Moog Music Make Filtatron, an iPhone Filtering, Effects, and Sampling App

Peter Kirn at Create Digital Music has the scoop on Moog’s Filtrtron app for iOS.

Moog Music, they of the normally analog-only gear, have built their first iOS application. We’ve acquired exclusive details of the innards of the app, and I’ve been testing it today on my (second-generation) iPod touch. Blasphemy? Perhaps, but it’s a nicely-designed little application, and with audio input capability, could turn your Apple handheld into a tiny recording and effects-processing unit alongside other gear. (Game Boy plus iPod touch? Casiotone plus iPod touch?)

The application, Filtatron, hasn’t yet been announced. There’s no information on pricing or availability, accordingly.

# Waveformless: Free Sample Friday: Chopping Wood

A nice sample pack by Waveformless reader Darren Halm, who writes:

"I have a bunch of samples I took yesterday of me chopping wood in my front yard. I'm actually whacking a heavy metal dowel with the back of an axe head. The resulting sound of metal hitting metal, coupled with some nice natural reverb from the surrounding lake and hill prompted me to grab my H4 and get them. I just roughly normalized and exported the markers in Peak, so they tend to tail out a bit; I figure most people are throwing them in a sampler with comprehensive ADSR so this wouldn't be a problem. "

# Modular Session W/ Dave Jones

Brain Green writes:

Last night i make my way out to Arlington, Ma to work on a new sample pack with Dave Jones, the idea was to record modulars and then process the recorded sounds.

A free sample pack is available from Brian's seeyouinsleep.com

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