Short links for April 19th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Bendable, Musical Shoes for Nike, and How They Were Made

Peter at Create Digital Music writes:

Shoes are the new turnables.

Or at least that’s the conclusion you might reach after watching a new Japanese campaign for Nike’s Free Run+ running shoes. Apparently wishing to tout the bendable qualities of its new footwear, Nike enlisted sound artists to transform its product into a musical instrument. The shoes get plugged in, switched on, and mixed up, battle-style, as they sense when the shoe is flexed or moved in space. And yes, everything you see in the video is real: the shoes really are controlling digital sound live. We even have the Max patch to prove it.

# What’s wrong with transient shapers?

Kim Lajoie writes:

Transient shapers are processors that adjust the dynamics of a sound. Rather than changing the dynamic range like a compressor, transient shapers operate only on the initial onset of the sound – the transient. The initial smack of a drum. The plink of a piano. The pick of a guitar or bass. They don’t work with sounds that don’t have a sudden start, such as vocals, violins, or synth pads. Transient shapers can either bring out the transient – making it louder, sharper and more prominent. They can also reduce the transient – making it softer and duller.

The tricky aspect to consider here is that the psychoacoustic (perceived) effects of a transient shaper can be similar to those of other tools.

# Xdrum, a sample based rhythm composer for Native Instruments Reaktor 5.

Xdrum
Xdrum for Reaktor 5

It has 800 audio samples (75MB) from 49 vintage rhythm composers, and then 11 additional soundsets. Besides that it has around 92 preset classic and electronica preset patterns.

Xdrum is available as a free download. via waka_x @ Twitter

# Fleischprodukt Waveshaper

A simple waveshaping plugin with various transfer functions (tanh, sin, atan, fold back, saturate, etc.) as AudioUnit Universal Binary for Mac OS X from 10.5 upwards.

Roland Dimension D

# Omega 8 into Roland SDD-320 Dimension D

Calvin writes:

Fired up the ol' Roland Dimension D today, because I was working on a track that needed something different. It's the Omega 8 that you're hearing here – more specifically – I've selected certain patches that I think work well with any sort of chorus. No particular order here in terms of the SDD-320's setting. I used every combination possible, going from each individual number all the way to 1+2, 1+3, etc. etc.

# FFT Algorithm Based Audio Spectrum Analyzer

This audio spectrum analyzer utilizes an ARM7 LPC2138 microcontroller to create an FFT algorithm while performing digital signal processing without the use of special DSP processor.

NitroTracker

# NitroTracker, Fasttracker II style tracker for the Nintendo DS goes open source.

I’m very excited to announce that NitroTracker is now completely open source!

What does this mean? Well, for starters you can now have a look at the source code. More importantly, you can now help develop it! Together we can make the development of NitroTracker go faster (which would be a very good thing considering current development speed) and finally add long-awaited features I promised ages ago.

The source code is available from http://code.google.com/p/nitrotracker

# The Future of Multi-Touch: Behind the Scenes with Stantum, JazzMutant Co-Founder

Peter Kirn takes a look at the future of multi-touch:

For a long time, technologists have described a world of in which computing experiences naturally incorporate touch and gesture. The question is, how do we bridge the intuitive desire for those interactions and the actual technologies that get us there?

Few activities test the expressive potential of interaction quite like music. It’s in our cultural DNA; musical activity may even predate written language. So it’s fitting that the story of touch in computing and digital music would be intertwined, as they are with touch pioneer JazzMutant. Years before well-known Apple products, the Lemur, prototyped in 2003 and shown as a musical multi-touch screen, suggested the importance of fusing display and touch, and of tracking more than a finger or two at a time.

The history, and products like Apple’s iPad and iPhone, you may know well, though. The question on everyone’s mind now is, what’s next? (And for some impatient futurists, the question may even be, what’s taking so long?)

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Short links for October 23rd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Awesome collection of DIY video-glitch hardware

From Make: Online:

The "tools" section of media artist Karl Klomp's website documents an impressive amount of bent, hacked and homebrew hardware for video manipulation. Devices such as the Failter (seen above) series go through a number of incarnations while Karl experiments with different hardware and uncovers its glitch-ability. The retro-simple feel of the enclosures give give it all a nicely 'scientific' almost medical feel.

# Waveformless: Free Sample Friday: SH-101 Percussion

Tom Shear shares another batch of lovely samples.

It's the weekend! Woohoo! Here to start your weekend off right are 20 synth percussion sounds from my Novamodded Roland SH-101 as 24-bit/44.1k WAV files. Enjoy!

# MPC2500 Gutted & Deconstructed (Vimeo) via Crate Kings

Hopefully most Akai owners will never have to witness their beloved music machine being gutted like this MPC2500 was. It’s not exactly pretty sight, but fascinating stuff for those that have been curious about the innards of a sampler/sequencer/drum machine.

# Avid Announces Third Quarter 2009 Results

Some interesting numbers from Avid’s financial department:

Avid® (NASDAQ: AVID) today reported revenues of $153.7 million for the three-month period ended September 30, 2009, compared to $217.1 million for the same period in 2008. The GAAP net loss for the quarter was $16.2 million, or $.43 per share, compared to a GAAP net loss of $66.4 million, or $1.80 per share, in the third quarter of 2008. The third quarter 2008 results included a non-cash impairment charge of $51.3 million or $1.39 per share.

The GAAP net loss for the third quarter of 2009 included amortization of intangibles, stock-based compensation, restructuring charges, loss on asset sales and related tax adjustments, collectively totaling $17.0 million. Excluding these items, the non-GAAP net income was $787 thousand for the third quarter, or $.02 per share.

# 279 / nanopedal via CDM

Marcus Fischer of dust breeding turned a Korg nanoKEY into a foot controller.

Marcus Fisher nanopedal

Marcus writes:

i’ve been wanting a compact usb midi foot pedal for a long time. i built one out of a usb number pad last year but it was less than ideal. tonight i popped all of the keys but five off of my korg nanokey in order to see how it would work as a pedal. it turned out that it worked really well. i cut some small pieces of plywood out to raise the key height and some scrap plexiglass to cover up the missing keys. a little spray paint and double stick tape and it was all finished.

i think it turned out pretty well. not bad for a cheap keyboard and scrap materials.

# The Stretta Procedure: Lego Foosball

Matthew Davidson made a Lego Fußball table for his son.

My son is really attracted to foosball tables, and, if I'm honest, I'd have to say I am too. I considered the idea of buying a small, tabletop unit, but I was unsure how much use it'd see. I was afraid it might become one of those things you play with for a bit, then collect dust. Once again, I see a solution in the form of Lego.

Korg DS-10 by sushipop @ Flickr

# Going Mobile: Nintendo DS-10 Comes to North America

Peter Kirn @ CDM writes:

Fans of the Nintendo DS in North America, the Korg DS-10 Plus synthesizer for Big N’s game system is now coming to your side of the Pacific Ocean. (That also bodes well, I think, for other parts of the world.) The DS-10 I think really deserves some credit for making a straight-up music title a hit on gaming platforms, and its success certainly surpassed my own expectations. It’s not a game, it’s not an interactive experience, it’s not a music game – it’s actually a synth and music workstation that happens to run on a game platform. The DS-10 Plus beefs up the original’s features, though it now has a commercially-available rival in the form of Rockstar’s Beaterator for PSP.

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Short links for October 16th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Drummer

# Drummer – A Collaborative Musical Interface with Mobility

Andrea Bianchi, a Ph.D. student at the Graduate School of Culture Technology (GSCT) in the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), South Korea, wrote in to report about a homebrew music application named Drummer for the Nintendo DS which was presented at the NIME 2009 conference (New Interfaces for Musical Expression).

Andrea writes:

It is basically a collaborative musical instrument, where multiple Nintendo DS users can play individually on their devices in order to collaborate on a track. Tracks can be recorded simultaneously, one per user. The project tries to bridge mobile interfaces with collaborative music instruments (usually constrained by the need of physical proximity among players), in order to create a collaborative instrument for the stage.

The system is based on client-server architecture over a wireless network; every client runs on a Nintendo DS -one of the most popular wireless handheld game devices with touch-screen functionality- while the server computer handles the clients’ requests and plays matching drum sounds with the software synthesizer.

Each user can take advantage of this small and intuitive pen-based device in order to create or customize a drum kit, and then perform together with other users simply by tapping and sliding the pen on the screen.

# CDM » PlayBox and PlayLive: Multitouch Control of Ableton Live and Beyond

Play Box is a User Interface for Natural User Interaction, PlayLive is a multitouch software application for Ableton Live.

SID 8580R5

# Commodore 64 SID 8580 Basic Sample Pack (112 Samples)

Sebastian Tomczak offers yet another pack of lovely samples.

I’ve made a C64 sample pack. To be precise, it’s a sample pack, featuring every C and G note from C-2 to G 6 for the main basic waveforms of a Commodore 64 (8580 SID chip). The waveforms are triangle, sawtooth, pulse and noise. The duty cycle for the pulse wave was set to approximately 50%. The samples were recorded from C64 hardware directly using a custom designed interface.

The samples are available for download in wav and mp3 formats.

# The chipsounds EP is out !!!

These tracks were made by the chipsounds beta team and really show the variety of styles and sounds that can be achieved with the software.

The only guideline given was that the music’s chip content had to be made using chipsounds. Artists were free to use whatever other sounds or instruments they wanted.

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Short links for February 17th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:


siftables music sequencer — audio engine by Josh Kopin

# Siftables by David Merrill:

Siftables aims to enable people to interact with information and media in physical, natural ways that approach interactions with physical objects in our everyday lives. As an interaction platform, Siftables applies technology and methodology from wireless sensor networks to tangible user interfaces.

Siftables are independent, compact devices with sensing, graphical display, and wireless communication capabilities. They can be physically manipulated as a group to interact with digital information and media. Siftables can be used to implement any number of gestural interaction languages and HCI applications.

# little-scale: More Kits for LSDj! Scriabin, Ellington, Mozart, HAL8999 etc
Sebastian posted some more kits for the LSJD Game Boy music program.
Also: Nanoloop 2.3 Kit for LSDJ!.

Bass from the Mystic Cave Zone theme (Sonic the Hedgehog 2)

# Cruise Elroy » Sonic on bass

The increased audio fidelity of 16-bit consoles brought several significant changes to video games, but perhaps the most important was that instruments could be readily identified. Instead of the melody being assigned to a triangle wave, for example, it could be assigned to a trumpet.

Dan Bruno lists some nice audio examples.

# NS168DS – NS168DSmotion is a multi-purpose NS168DS compatible adapter, it can be used in different modes as standalone device powered from USB or as a plugin module powered from some NS168DS host like DS/DSi.

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Short links for October 28th, 2008

The Beta

Some interesting things I found recently:

# The Beta Release – The Beta, tbeta for short, is a open source/cross-platform solution for computer vision and multi-touch sensing.

It takes an video input stream and outputs tracking data (e.g. coordinates and blob size) and touch events (e.g. finger down, moved and released) that are used in building multi-touch applications. tbeta can interface with various web cameras and video devices as well as connect to various TUIO/OSC enabled applications and supports many multi-touch lighting techniques including: FTIR, DI, DSI, and LLP with expansion planned for the future (custom modules/filters).

# DS brut – DS brut is an open source hardware prototyping platform for the Nintendo DS, developed by and for electronics enthusiasts, artists and game developers.

# Lineal TML 01 – Analog Syntheziser: Home made analog syntheziser – Cool DIY synthesizer project by Emiliano Gonzalo Rodriguez.

Daito Manabe

# Daito Manabe Makes Music with Parts of His Face

Peter Kirn writes:

Daito Manabe is a Japanese-based composer, media artist, and DJ who does strange and wonderful things with inputs. This time, he’s hooked up electrical outputs to his face, so multimedia software Max/MSP, his usual tool of choice, can sequence muscle movements via electrical pulses transmitted directly to the surface of his face.

# AC/DC releases ASCII music video in Microsoft Excel – created by fans to "subvert the corporate firewalls".

# NanoGroover: Triplets and Quintuplets in Nanoloop

Sebastian Tomczak made a device that generates Nanoloop sync data for two Game Boys. This allows the user to set the ratio of sync clock of one of the Game Boys to the other, in the following ratios:

  • Two in the time of four (double speed)
  • Three in the time of four (three against four cross rhythms)
  • Four in the time of four (1:1; the sync is equal)
  • Five in the time of four (quintuplets)
  • Six in the time of four (triplets)
Softube Tube Delay

# Review: Softube Spring Reverb, Tube Delay

Stiff @ ProToolerBlog writes:

I was very excited when Softube told me about two of their new products they were working on, Spring Reverb and Tube Delay. First of all, I’m a delay-junkie. To me room equals delay, and I don’t care for most type of reverb, though I usually end up using one in my mixes nowadays. Second of all, this reverb was a spring reverb emulation, not another convolution one. Third of all, they were made by Softube!

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More posts that match this tag

Short links for October 3rd, 2008

Some interesting things I found recently: # Native Instruments Spiral (YouTube) – a sequenced Reaktor synth by Lazyfish, part of the Reaktor Animated Circuits KORE SoundPack (also available free to Reaktor users. Whoohoo!) Native Instruments … read more