Results for Eko

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Rhythmic Robot releases New Rhythm Box for Kontakt

Rhythmic Robot New Rhythm Box

Rhythmic Robot has announced New Rhythm Box, a recreation of the vintage analogue drum machine of the same name, originally made by the Italian company EKO.

The New Rhythm Box was a transistor-based preset drum machine capable of producing ten preset rhythms, with no provision for anything beyond tempo and volume control. The Rhythmic Robot software version extends this usability considerably, breaking out the individual kit pieces so that the user can create their own rhythms, while still allowing the original presets to be played back, combined, and synced to host DAW tempo.

The tone of the New Rhythm Box is ideally suited to mellower musical styles which favour a more rounded, softer tone.

New Rhythm Box features

  • Ten combinable onboard rhythms.
  • Convolved Plate reverb for retro authenticity.
  • Velocity Retrofit for humanising your beats.
  • Multiple randomised round-robin samples to preserve a true analogue feel.
  • Fully analogue sounds, all the way from Italy!

The sample library costs £5.25 GBP. Requires Kontakt version 4.2.3 or later, full version.

More information: Rhythmic Robot / New Rhythm Box

UVI releases String Machines vintage analog string synthesizers

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UVI has announced String Machines, a hybrid instrument forged with the analog imprint of the 11 most musical string synthesizers ever built.

UVI String Machines

Back in the 70′s, leading keyboard designers around the world attempted to reproduce orchestral string sounds through analog synthesis. The results were far from their original intent but were in no way failures. Used on countless cult records and engrained in our collective memory to this day – these ‘String Machines’ bore an analog soul on their own.

At UVI we are obsessed with this, having spent countless hours working on ways to capture this analog soul and present it as an accessible, expressive, fully editable digital tool. So was born String Machines – a hybrid instrument forged with the analog imprint of the 11 most musical string synthesizers ever built.

UVI has painstaking recorded thousands of samples with the very best analog and digital gear available, putting in all experience ever learned to bring you this comprehensive instrument at an unbelievable price.

String Machines features

  • Authentic sounds with character reproduce the analog grunge and warmth of yesteryear.
  • Instant access to tons of presets and preset layers; find sounds you love and get inspired quickly.
  • Dual layers. Select the machine and the associated sounds.
  • No loading time when switching machines and sounds.
  • Shape your sounds using authentic analog-modeled filters, envelopes, and LFOs.
  • Experiment with the step modulator and take your sound out of this world!
  • Samples recorded in 24/96 khz with Prism convertors, mastered to perfection and converted to 16/44.1 kHz.
  • Included machines: Korg Poly Ensemble PE2000, Eko Stradivarius, Siel Orchestra, Excelsior Strings Synthesizer K4, Logan String Melody, Crumar Performer, Elka Rhapsody, Solina String Ensemble, Yamaha SS30, ROLAND RS-505 & VP-330.

String Machines is available to purchase for $99 USD / 89 EUR.

More information: UVI / String Machines

Review: Goldbaby Productions Vinyl Drum Machines

Goldbaby Productions Vinyl Drum Machines

Goldbaby has released a new collection of drum samples: Vinyl Drum Machines.

Nope, Hugo @ Goldbaby hasn’t been crate digging for obscure vinyl for his latest product. Instead he had his own acetate record cut so he could sample drum machine sounds to get that authentic vinyl touch.

Sampling off vinyl has been a staple of many producers since samplers were invented. Vinyl has an unmistakable sound. Using it as a sample source you get material that is dripping with personality and warmth, that digital sources just can’t recreate.

I have always wanted a record with just drum machine samples on it. Finally I did something about it.

You can see a video of the making of the acetate here.

The result is a record with of 14 drum machines: Linn Drum, TR-626, CR-78, MBase 01, DR-110, Linn LM-1, Drumulator, TR-808, Ritmo 12, TR-909, TR-505, µTonic, SP-12, TR-606.

The drum machine sounds were then sampled from the vinyl record, using 3 different turntables:

  • Pro-Ject RPM + Pro-Ject Tube Box II — audiophile equipment for pristine recordings.
  • Technics SL-1700 + Leak Variscope — vintage setup with a late 70′s turntable and a 60′s phono pre-amp.
  • Vestax Handy Trax — portable record player which runs on batteries; lo-fi!

The end result: 1468 x 24 bit samples.

Besides all the drum machine sounds, Hugo also sampled some bonus content: vinyl noise, vinyl clicks, vinyl hitz and center grooves.

Vinyl Drum Machines is available in Wav, Battery 3 and Guru formats (ReFill soon) starting at $29 USD.

So what do I think?

Every time I see a new Goldbaby I wonder how it is going to be different from all the other drum machine sample libraries I’ve seen before (including Goldbaby’s own libraries), and time after time he manages to exceed my expectations.

Vinyl Drum Machines is a fantastic idea, and perfectly executed. The samples are top notch quality as per usual and the selection of drum machines used provides plenty of variety.

And here’s a nice tip from Hugo:

I have been experimenting with velocity switching between the different record player versions of each drum sound. Hit a pad/key lightly and it plays the plastic portable turntable version, hit it harder and it plays the audiophile version and hit it really hard and it plays the vintage record player version.

Makes for some interesting dynamic drum machine sounds…

Check out the sound clips on the product page and get your wallet out… there is a good chance you’re going to want these!

Visit Goldbaby Productions for more information.

Review: Goldbaby Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1 sample pack

Goldbaby Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1

Goldbaby Productions has released another sample library featuring some sampled drum machines: Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1.

After the familiar sounds of the The Tape808, 909 and freebie 606 (all Roland TR machines), Goldbaby dug up 8 somewhat more obscure vintage drum machines to sample.

Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1 comes with a nice PDF with detailed information on each drum machine.

  • Conn Rhapsody Rhythm Unit — This is a (rare) rhythm unit from a Conn Rhapsody organ. It has 22 presets and 10 sounds.
  • Korg Rhythm 55B — This Roland CR competitor has some warm analog sounds. It has a stunning 96 patterns, and 10 sounds (looks like this is the version 2 model without the disco rhythms).
  • Electro Harmonix DRM 15 / 16 / 32 — Features the lovely space-drum and the snap sounds. The analogue sounds from these boxes are great for electro music.
  • Eko Ritmo 12 — The little brother of the Ritmo 20, this rhythm box has 12 preset rhythms.
  • Univox Micro Rhythmer — A small little analog box with 8 preset rhythms and 5 individual sounds. I thought the Rhythmer only had a kick sound with layered hihat, but this machine does have the individual base drum sound (and snare, hi hat, open hi hat and rim shot).
  • Roland Rhythm 330 — The Rhythm 330 (or TR-330) has a warm analog sound. It’s another organ rhythm box without the actual organ. Comes with some lovely cheesy patterns.
  • Hohner Rhythm 80K — This German rhythm unit features 80 patterns and 8 sounds. It’s sounds rather tame with a subby kick and modest snare sounds.
  • Olson X-100 — An American rhythm unit that nobody seems to know much about. The 8 individual sounds can be triggered. It sounds quite noisy and rough to me.

The nice thing about these analog drum machines is that you’ll virtually never hear the exact same sound twice. Goldbaby has recorded multiple samples of each drum sound to give you the same kind of analog feel.

Besides the samples you also get tons of the presets in REX format so you can play the rhythms as if you have the real thing.

So what do I think?

I realize these type of samples are not everyone’s cup of tea (Zak, do not buy this!), but if you’re into vintage analog drum machine sounds, you’re going to like this one.

Since it’s a Goldbaby library you can also be sure the quality is top notch and the price is right: $24 USD for Guru, $19 USD for the Wav & Rex Pack.

More information: Goldbaby Productions / Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1

Goldbaby releases Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1

Goldbaby Productions Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1

Goldbaby Productions has released Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1, a sample pack featuring 8 vintage drum machines.

From the product page:

The first electronic drum machines were analog preset machines. They were designed to be electronic drummers… They almost never sounded realistic but this has made them very appealling to electronicmusicians! Analog AutoRhythyms Vol 1 is a collection of 8 of these vintage drum machines. An ecletic mix of rare,bizarreand famous instruments…

Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1 features

  • 8 drum machines used:
    1. Korg – KR 55B
    2. Roland – TR 330
    3. Conn – Rhapsody Rhythm Unit
    4. Electro Harmonix – DRM 15 / 16 / 32
    5. Eko – Ritmo 12
    6. Univox – Micro Rhythmer
    7. Hohner – Rhythm 80K
    8. Olson – X100
  • Multiple samples of each drum sound give this product the ability to sound more “analog” than just one sample per drum (This can be achieved by using round robin layering).
  • Includes a selection of the original beats in Rex format.

Analog AutoRhythms Vol 1 is available a download for Guru ($24 USD) and as a Wav & Rex Pack ($19 USD).

Visit Goldbaby Productions for more information and audio demos.