Short links for February 18th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Meet Marv (Marv), a MIDI Actuated Robotic Vibraphone.

Marv can play music of high complexity, far more complex than a human player could ever achieve, as Marv is capable of striking any and all keys simultaneously, as well as damping each key individually. Marv can play much faster than a human vibraphonist, repeating single notes as quickly as 25ms apart. Marv can play with sensitivity and feeling limited only by MIDI programming effort. Marv is a platform for further research on musical automation and real-time musical interaction.

# Noteput

Noteput by Jonas Friedemann Heuer is an interactive music table with tangible notes, that helps students to learn the notation of music.

“Notput” is an interactive music table with tangible notes, that combines all three senses of hearing, sight and touch to make learning the classical notation of music for children and pupils more easy and interesting.

All basic clefs, note values and accidentals exist as single wood elements. Whole, half, quarter and eighth notes differ not only in their form, but also in their weight: Long note values are heavier than short ones.

# Record grooves under an electron microscope

Via SynthGear:

Chris Supranowitz is a researcher at The Insitute of Optics at the University of Rochester. Along with a number of other spectacular studies (such as quantum optics, trapping of atoms, dark states and entanglement), Chris has decided to look at the relatively boring grooves of a vinyl record using the institute’s electron microscope. Well, not boring for me.

Record groove (image by Chris Supranowitz)
A single record groove, magnified 1000 times

Awesome images! Lots more on Chris’ website (note to those who are entomophobic; includes ladybug and fly images).

# 8 band graphic EQ for the Launchpad

From Illuminated Sounds:

I thought it would be cool to have a graphic eq display on the launchpad so I built this 8 band graphic EQ. As of now, it has these controls:

  1. Adjustable peak filters on each band
  2. Individual band volume controls for those unruly frequencies
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Short links for November 23rd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# MidiFighter Kit

Ean Golden at djtechtools writes:

I am pleased to announce that in 2 weeks time we will be selling DIY MidiFighter kits in the web-store. This kit will be the first incarnation of our brand new controller line that allows several different levels of customization. Everything from creating original color combos to adding more analog interfaces and customizing the open-source firmware is possible with this exciting new tool.

MidiFighter
MidiFighter Kit

MidiFighter kit details

  • Release Date: November 30th.
  • Price: Aprox $125 for the Kit + Arcade Buttons ($2.50 each) optional wood case- $40.
  • Plug and Play-compatible device, compliant MIDI controller.
  • USB powered.
  • Must be assembled (no expertise required).
  • 16 programmable buttons.
  • 16 programmable LEDs.
  • Expandable to 20 programmable buttons and 4 analog controls.
  • Limited-edition 200-piece run in this configuration (black PCB with blue LEDs).

# PyMT

PyMT is a python module for developing multi-touch enabled media rich applications. Currently the aim is to allow for quick and easy interaction design and rapid prototype development. PyMT is written in Python, based on pyglet toolkit. We are about 10 contributors and ~40000 lines of code (version 0.3).

Speak & Math

# Audio Geek Zine Free Sound Of The Week 04

Jon at Audio Geek Zine offers some free samples from his circuit bent Speak & Math in his weekly series of free sounds.

This time Iā€™m digging into the archives. What I’ve got this week is sounds from my circuit bent Speak & Math, from a few years ago. These are taken straight from my Toys Breaking library, if you like glitchy weird samples check that out.

There are 89 wave files, mono, 16 bit, 44.1kHz.

# James’ Circuit Bent Library

James at Illuminated Sounds also shares some free samples from circuit bent toys.

Here is a Collection of samples from a few of my own circuit bent toys. I’ve made a quick couple of videos that will show you the method of how I captured these samples. I edited them in Protools at 16bit 441khz as mono WAV files. Feel free to comment or request any more. Enjoy.

Hardware Random7

# Hardware version of Random7

More from Illuminated Sounds. Miketron's random MIDI note generation software (MAC/PC) goes hardware:

A couple of months I took my MAX/MSP code for Random7 and rewrote so I could embed it into a hardware version. Random7 Hardware Version 1 (R7H) is a very basic version of the Random7 software. The core element of R7H is still the same, the program pick from 7 different midi notes randomly. As of now the key R7H is preset to the key of A Major, and the only control is a potentiometer that controls the speed of R7H. Output for R7H is a midi port, an on/off switch, and there is also a red led the flashes everytime a note is sent. The some of the next additions I plan to the hardware are a midi input to provide midi sync options, a small lcd to provide useful information such as tempo and key, and allow user to pick from any diatonic major key. The microcontroller I am using for this is the arduino built into a d.i. box housing.

# Ohm Force studio pic contest, powered by Sample Magic !!!

All you need to do is post a picture of you in your studio for a chance to win some Sample Magic libraries.

The only two requirements are: the computer screen must show some Ohm plugins interfaces and you must be in an “audio magician” pose. Each of the three winners will be able to pick three Sample Magic libraries of choice, for free, worldwide shipping or instant download through www.soundstosample.com. The pictures will be judged by the Sample Magicians themselves in their London HQ. Make-up and dressing up allowed. Rabbits and all domestic animals not allowed. The picture (or the link to it) must be posted on the comments section of this blog post, until November 30th 2009.

Tenori-On @ Modulate This!

# Hands-On with the Tenori-On: First Impressions + Integration with Ableton Live

Mark Mosher shares his first impressions of the Tenori-On.

Now that REBOOT has released, I’m gearing up to perform these songs live. One of my goals it to make the performances more visually interesting, help the audience connect with what I’m doing musically, and not spend an entire set hunched over a laptop.

I just added a Tenori-On White to my rig to help achieve this goal and to use as a controller and sequencer for composition. In this post I’ll offer some first impressions and notes on use.

# Little Gem Guitar Amp

garagemonkeysan's take on the famous Little Gem mini guitar amp.

All details on the electronics can be found at runoffgroove.com. http://www.runoffgroove.com/littlegem.html
The case came from Jameco p/n 11886. The speaker bezel is the rim of a tin can that was epoxied to the case. The disk in the rear serves as a cord reel.

Audiomulch (with Metasurface), Novation Remote Zero SL and the Launchpad

# Launchpad, No Live: Novation Launchpad Review

John Fisher reviews the Launchpad.

I recently picked up a Novation Launchpad because I wanted the control options of a grid controller, even though I don’t use Ableton live. I plan on using the Launchpad with Reaktor, Audiomulch, and possibly Processing. The price wasn’t hard to swallow either. I’ve seen very little info thus far on people using the Launchpad with anything besides Ableton Live, except for people who are using the “nonome” max/msp patch that allows you to load up other monome applications via the Launchpad. So, I thought I would do a write-up on my thoughts. The way I prefer to work is making my own custom midi mappings with my controllers. Novation’s Automap system might be interesting for others, but I always prefer to have my own configurations because I’m picky about those sorts of things. So I’ll be detailing how I went about that.

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Illuminated Sounds releases Random7

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Illuminated Sounds Random7

Illuminated Sounds has released Random7, a free random MIDI generating program created with MAX/MSP.

Miketron writes:

It is basically a 8 step sequencer that outputs midi by randomly selecting from the 7 notes in the various scales pictured above, and also randomly selects the velocity of each of the notes. The layout is very simple, the drop down menu lets you select your scale, noteout lets you choose your midi i/o, the start/stop button does just that, the knob adjusts speed, and you can click on any of the red spots to trigger a note manually.

Random7 is available for Windows and Mac.

Check Illuminated Sounds for more information and some demo sounds.

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