Results for instruments

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'instruments'.

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Short links for September 22nd, 2008

Some interesting things I found recently:

Rhythm Ring by Brian Yung & Hanson Jiang

# Rhythm Ring: Interactive Rhythm Sequencer – The Rhythm Ring interactive rhythm sequencer is an engaging musical device that enables the user to create a plethora of rhythms and beat patterns with the touch of their own fingers.

Besides being fun to play with, the Rhythm Ring provides a tangible method of arranging a musical rhythm. In our design, the user can arrange beats and modify them in real time by moving steel ball bearings between holes—a physical representation of notes on a musical staff. The Rhythm Ring continuously loops up to three tracks, each with its own voice. A central ring of LEDs provide the user with live feedback for current "playhead" position, and bright LEDs pulse when a note is played due to a detected bearing. The three tracks allow the playback of three different percussion sounds: snare, hi-hat, and bass drum.

The Rhythm Ring is the ECE 476 Final Project by Brian Yung (bmy5) & Hanson Jiang (hcj4).

# Randy George Music – Randy George is a classical thereminist. The theremin, invented in 1919 by Russian physicist, Lev Sergeyevich Termen, is an electronic musical instrument, played entirely without physical contact. Randy aims to share the theremin with the world and restore its reputation as a serious musical instrument.

Randy is also part of this Daft Punk – Something About Us – Daft Loop Love performance.

Ableton Live looped cover of Something About Us by Daft Punk, performed on Nintendo DS Ubisoft Jam Sessions, Midi controlled software electric bass, drums, synth, vocoded vocals, and solo theremin, recorded in a single pass, with a single camera.

Check the YouTube video info for more details.

# MAKE: Blog: Sad news.. Mark Hoekstra of Geektechniques has passed away – more info (in Dutch) on the Bright.nl site.

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Short links for August 18th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on August 18th, 2008:

Reaktor

# Learning Reaktor: 10-Step Path to Building New Sequencers, Beatboxes, and Effects

Peter Kirn writes:

“What if you had to take just one software instrument with you to a desert island?” It’s not an entirely silly question, with so many choices in software potentially distracting you from real music making. I say, cheat: take a tool that lets you build your own tools, specific to the job. Reaktor immediately springs to mind.

# Echoplex Drum Simulator – Mike L’s Nine Inch Nails-inspired Echoplex Drum Simulator, a Windows drum sequencer.

# New Circle Sound bank available… – A new bank of 30 sounds for Circle, designed by Dajan Izzo is available on the Circle downloads page

# NOR_/D TouchKit – TouchKit is a modular multitouch development kit with the aim to make multitouch readily available in an open source fashion. It is a sister project of the CUBIT multitouch system and aimed at rapid implementation of multitouch projects.

# little-scale: Toriton Version 1.5 – Sebastian Tomczak upgrades his Toriton water surface instrument.

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Short links for July 1st, 2008

Some interesting things I found on July 1st, 2008:

# AirPiano – The AirPiano is an innovative musical interface which allows playing and controlling software instruments simply by moving hands in the air.

AirPiano
AirPiano by Omer Yosha (2007)

Above the AirPiano is a virtual matrix of keys and faders, each assigned with MIDI messages and ready to be triggered. The length of a triggered note is equivalent to the time a hand is placed on the corresponding virtual key. This is also confirmed by LED feedback.

The AirPiano is still in its prototype phase and its concept of a virtual matrix might eventually be used for other applications and purposes. Specifications: Polyphonic, MIDI protocol, Up to 24 keys / 8 faders, USB connectivity. (link via CDM)

# MAKE: Blog: Handmade Music Night returns! – 7/8/08 – Create Digital Music, Etsy, and MAKE join forces to bring to life another night of audio-crafting delight – July 8th @ the Etsy Labs. Come see a myriad of sound-bearing ideas made real.

# Sound Chaser – A train-style record player. Users connect the chipped pieces of records together to make new tracks. The records pieces are from cheap records bought at jumble sales or used record shops. This record player revives forgotten, old records.

# Weepr – Download Create and share your beat! – Kind of like the Tenori-On, but not really… The English site doesn't seem to be up yet. You'll need Adobe Air to run Weepr.

# Guitar Tube Amp – Want to build your own tube amplifier for guitar? There are many options: build a kit, build from an existing schematic, or branch off like I did, and try something different. Maybe, like me, you'll design and build from scratch…

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Short links for June 26th, 2008

GetLoFi Easy Dub Siren from a Circuit Bent Keychain

Some interesting things I found on June 26th, 2008:

# How to Make an Easy Dub Siren from a Circuit Bent Keychain – GetLoFi has instructions on how to build your own dub siren box using an inexpensive sound effects keychain and a few other simple parts.

The total for parts should be under $20 and possibly even cheaper if you are resourceful and can strip components from discarded electronics, etc.

# Sonic picnic boxes – The sonic picnic set is a low tech modular system. Connections are made as needed using crocodile clips.

# “Morpher” circuit bend – Circuit bent "voice morpher" megaphone packed into the case of a V-750 model 5 dosimeter charger. The lamp within the power button was modified with an LED to replace the incandescent lamp.

# dsSynth – Play the Nintendo DS like you would with any hardware synthesizer/sampler. The software allows the user to draw in a wave form on the touch screen, use one of the embedded sounds, or load one of their own samples off of their flash memory card.

# remain calm » ds music apps – the nintendo ds is an excellent platform for homebrew audio software – here’s an (incomplete) list of some of the excellent sound toys that are available for the platform.

# repeaterDS at glitchDS – a music application that allows you to “play” a sample by drawing on the DS screen. The vertical axis controls repeat length. The horizontal axis controls the playback offset into the sample.

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Short links for June 18th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on June 18th, 2008:

# Jules Vernian Analog Synthesizer | The Steampunk Workshop

Jake von Slatt writes:

Peter wrote me a while back with some pictures of his latest project, a Jules Verne inspired analog synthesizer with etched brass control panels.

Peter Winterhill's modular synth
Modular synth in its cabinet, a panel and pcb on the right

Peter Winterhill‘s synth is designed to be modular and re-configurable, so Peter was looking for a process that could be repeated in-house at any time in the future should he wish to add or change modules.
He used the electrolytic etching process Jake used for the Moleskine journals, but he’s made some really clever plate holders instead of Jake’s duct tape. SPWS has a little Q&A with Peter.

# Mark Griffiths Music: Wiard 300 Samples – Having got the Wiard 300 series up and running, I decided to take a quick canter through some simple patches and a few of the patch ideas on the Wiard site.

# ‘Oldest’ computer music unveiled – 1951 – A scratchy recording of Baa Baa Black Sheep and a truncated version of In the Mood are thought to be the oldest known recordings of computer generated music.

# BoxBeat | Karl D.D. Willis – a prototype toy that turns the surface of your desk into a beat making instrument. It uses contact microphones to detect different sounds from the desk surface, and a simple software patch to trigger audio samples.

# Spinalcat – A five month-long (graduate thesis) project concentrated on the development of a hardware/software interface for controlling musical events on a computer using a set of disk-jockey turntables and paper "records" that can be printed or drawn.

# Moving Music: 10 Ways for a Music Geek to Move House – Dave Dri shares some of tips he found useful in his own recent moving.

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Short links for June 17th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on June 17th, 2008:

N-Tune (Gibson & Fender models)

# N-Tune — Tuning where you need it…in your guitar

N-Tune is the world's most convenient solution for fast, accurate onboard guitar tuning. It installs under your electric guitar's existing volume knob, and provides a bright, LED-based tuning ring with true-bypass circuitry for perfect tone.

N-Tune features

  • Fast, accurate tuning, built right into your guitar.
  • Pull your volume knob to tune up silently; push knob back down to play.
  • True bypass design preserves your instrument’s original tone.
  • Installs in your guitar in 30 minutes – no drilling or permanent modification required.
  • Includes white, black, cream and parchment-colored tuning rings.

N-tune is available for single-coil guitars with 250k Ohm volume pot, and humbucker-equipped guitars with 500k Ohm volume pot.

# FOUND ELECTRONICS » Projects » Circuit Bent – Found Electronics has, over the years, produced a wide variety of circuit bent instruments: devices whose original function has been mangled and transformed into weird and wonderful creators of noise.

# Hacking Toys into Tangible Controllers – Here are some recent projects from year 2 of the Creative Media course at DKIT. The student groups were each given a toy and assigned the task of hacking it together with a keyboard to create a controller for an original interactive experience made in flash and/or director.

# Javascript Super Mario Kart – A prototype of a Javascript Mario Kart-like racing game, just 11kb!

# 1-star review of The Incredible Hulk in Hulk-speak

Peter Bradshaw wrote his 1-star review of The Incredible Hulk in Hulk-speak:

“Hulk. Smash!” Yes. Hulk. Smash. Yes. Smash. Big Hulk smash. Smash cars. Buildings. Army tanks. Hulk not just smash. Hulk also go rarrr! Then smash again. Smash important, obviously. Smash Hulk’s USP. What Hulk smash most? Hulk smash all hope of interesting time in cinema. Hulk take all effort of cinema, effort getting babysitter, effort finding parking, and Hulk put great green fist right through it. Hulk crush all hopes of entertainment. Hulk in boring film. Film co-written by star. Edward Norton. Norton in it. Norton write it. Norton not need gamma-radiation poisoning to get big head.

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Short links for May 26th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on May 26th, 2008:

# glitchDS – A free homebrew Cellular Automaton music sequencer for the Nintendo DS. Perfect for creating IDM and Glitch style loops.

glitchDS
glitchDS – a music sequencer driven by the “game of life”

glitchDS features include:

  • Customizable Cellular Automaton sequencer.
  • Create your own “trigger points”.
  • Load in your own sounds.
  • Save and load your work.
  • BPM settings, or “strum mode” for controlling tempo.
  • Up to 6 sounds can be loaded at once.
  • Each sound has its own 32 step frequency modulation sequencer.
  • Global Distortion setting.

Check this YouTube video to see glitchDS in action.

 

# Arduino library for Peggy 2.0 – This brings Peggy 2.0 up to the level of having useful compatibility with the Arduino software environment: you can use high-level commands to control what shows up on the Peggy display.

# Chris Graham’s MultiWind instruments – The Mini Instrument (payable in many styles including brass, harmonica and breath controller) and the Woodwind style instrument, which is convertible from the Mini Instrument by snapping on the Finger Unit.

# Beatesthesia – highly customizable WYSIWYG music visualizer – Inspired in motive and design by synesthesia. Synesthesia from the Ancient Greek (syn), meaning “with,” and (aisthesis), meaning “sensation” is the phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway.

# Noise Toy in a Tea Tin

Becky Stern writes:

I assembled my Noise Toy kit knowing that I wanted to put it in some kind of enclosure, so I made sure to break out all the switches with wires. I found an old tea tin in my father’s shop and he helped me mount the circuit inside. We used a piece of wood to mount the circuit board inside and space the audio jack nearer the center of the lid. The two screws mounting the wood piece sort of look like eyes, and the switches on either side sort of look like ears, if you imagine it as a robot.

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