Results for interview

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'interview'.

Note: Use the search form in the top right if you're looking for something specific.

  

Short links for August 19th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Christopher Willits of XLR8R takes a look at some of the features of Max for Live (no it’s not out yet!).

Warning: there’s a pretty loud advert before the video actually starts so be sure to turn down the volume on your set before hitting the play button on the video below…

# MaoMakMaa Sample and DIY Blog – Lots of interesting sampled instruments, field recordings etc.

Anamanaguchi by Oliver Lopena

# The Art of Music with Chips: Behind the Scenes with 8-bit Band Anamanaguchi

Vijiht Assar talks to Pete Berkman of 8-bit band Anamanaguchi:

I recently had a chance to chat with Anamanaguchi, who would probably be the boy-band teen idols of the chiptune world if the scene were to tolerate such things.

Lead songwriter Pete Berkman opened up about his creative process and the digital speed bumps he hits along the way, and guitarist Ary Warnaar is on another planet when it comes to working with Game Boy synths like LSDJ and Nanoloop, but the most freakish technical bits came from bassist James DeVito. He wrote later to describe in detail the customized hardware he’s cobbling together for use on tour, which so far has involved modding the Nintendo for multiple outputs, each with a bolted-on 1/4″ jack and volume knob, and integrating a tiny high-res screen lifted from a PlayStation. He’s even considering a built-in controller for the next version.

# nanoKONTROL Myr for Ableton Live: Free, Powerful Control for Live – Custom python script for the nanoKontrol by James Waterworth aka Myralfur. Includes interactive scene triggers.

comment

Short links for January 12th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Zoom H4N

# First look at the Zoom H4N digital audio recorder

Brad Linder takes a look at the Zoom H4N, a digital pocket recorder.

I got a chance to stop by the Samson booth at CES yesterday and check out the new Zoom H4N digital audio recorder. This flash recorder is an upgraded version of the Zoom H4, but Zoom and Samson don't plan to phase out the older model. Rather, they'll now offer flash recorders in three price ranges, $199 for the Zoom H2, $249 to $299 for the Zoom H4, and $349 for the zoom H4N, which is a bit closer to being a pro audio device. The new recorder should begin shipping in February.

# Like a DIY NAMM: Handmade Music Preview, with Gestural Gadgets, Mannequin Parts, More

Peter Kirn posts details on some of the DIY projects that you can go check out for yourself at the upcoming Handmade Music Night, this thursday in NYC.

What’s new in the world of music technological creations? It’s stunning how much people are creating in their private workshops and bedrooms. I’m pleased to have the chance to share it virtually here, and Thursday night in person in New York City.

Here’s a look at the projects. It’s a bit like having an all-DIY, oddball music tech trade show – eat your heart out, NAMM show! (Warning: one slightly not-safe-for-work clip of a mannequin getting felt up.)

# Stanwood craftsman puts human touch on factory-made pianos – Darrell Fandrich is a micromaker of pianos, importing instruments from China and parts from Europe and the U.S. and rebuilding them as Fandrich & Sons pianos. A craftsman in an assembly-line world, Fandrich hopes that human touch can turn back the clock on pianos built by conveyor belt.

# Interview With Smule’s Dr. Ge Wang (Maker of iPhone Ocarina)

Modulate This interview with Dr. Ge Wang

Mark Mosher interviews Dr. Ge Wang, CTO and Co-founder of Smule.com.

Smule are the makers of extremely popular and innovative iPhone applications such as Sonic Lighter and Ocarina. Dr. Wang is also an assistant professor at Stanford University, at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He holds a PhD in Computer Science from Princeton University and a BS in Computer Science from Duke University. Ge is the creator and chief architect of the ChucK audio programming language, and the founding director of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk).

I asked a wide variety of questions in this interview – so – whether you are a musician, a developer, an iPhone user, or an entrepreneur, I hope you find this interview interesting and enlightening.

The interview is available in YouTube and mp3 formats.

# Music Thing: The end of Music Thing, for now. – I’m sure you’ve heard the news… Thanks Music Thing for all the great posts over the years.

comment

Short links for November 17th, 2008

Some interesting things I found recently:

Richard Devine & Audiocubes

# An interview with Richard Devine

Percussa's Bert Schiettecatte writes:

A while ago we went to Winter NAMM (in January 2008), to show the AudioCubes. We were lucky to hang out with our good friends Kyle and Ryan from Subtractive, they have a studio in Santa Monica and do a lot of great sound design and composition work, while at the same time producing film and working on their album (see the Test Short Starfish remix contest from a while ago, which was featured on Percussa’s main website).

Ryan and Kyle have been AudioCube users since the very beginning, I think they have serial number 10 on their cubes. They introduced us to Richard Devine, and naturally a discussion about his work and music technology emerged.

# true – The new sound, light and dance performance, true is a stage performance piece that explores the relationship between the brain and the reality we face, and is, performed by two performers.

# ISM: The Quantum Hall Effects — impulse responses from nanospace for convolution reverb. Tony Dubshot writes:

After many years of fundamental research in cooperation with the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory (Leiden Institute of Physics) the ISM studio proudly presents 'the sound of nanospace'. It's all about levels of magnification and breaking down the wall between analog and digital sound. Quantum hall fx are nothing less than a paradigm shift in the perception of time and space.

You can download a 27.1 MB archive of 24bit impulse responses released under a Creative Commons license from the ISM blog.

# SOUNDS.BUTTER Visible Sound – The "Visible Sound" project attempts to create a physical version of the sound around it by sewing sound waves in realtime. Although this was just a concept, we like ways of making invisible objects like sound waves into tangible forms.

comment

Short links for July 3rd, 2008

Some interesting things I found on July 3rd, 2008:

# SuNSyNtH – DIY synth based on voice changer chip.

SuNSyNtH
Flame+Sun+DoD(MoD) 32 switches, 12 knobs, 16 LED’s, and 2 joysticks

From the website:

This small box can produce thousands variations of bleeps, noises, feedbacks, ring-mod sounds and drons. It can also process external signal – than it works like ring modulator, digitalizer or pitch shifter. It has 2 body contacts, pitch shifting knob, voltage knob and few switchers. In some mode it can be controlled as thermin, just by moving the hand behind. Also it has expression pedal input, audio in and audio out.

More images, a video, and sound clips here.

# scratchcontroller [MidiBox.org] – The aim of this project is to build a MIDI controller that can be used by scratch DJs. This can be broken down into two main requirements: A very high-resolution, accurate jog wheel and a smooth, reliable, high quality crossfader with curve control.

# SimplyNoise.com – The best free white noise generator on the Internet. – Slide the orb, Find comfort zone, Enjoy auditory zen!

# Adieu, XP; How Vista SP1 is Doing, and Why This OS Generation Has Been So Tough – Peter Kirn takes a good look at the current state of Vista for making music.

# Matrixsynth: FLAME “ECHOMETER” and FLAME “SIX-IN-A-ROW” – A Midi loop sequencer and a Grid-Sequencer & Midi-Controller.

# Heartcode – Free music download from net label iimusic featuring tracks by Temp Sound Solutions, Alex Mauer, Disasterpeace, Animal Style, Phlogiston, Shnabubula, Xoc, and Norrin Radd.

# genoQs Machines – Nemo (now available) – Nemo is a high-end MIDI step sequencer, adding portability to the highly acclaimed functionality and user friendliness of Octopus. It is in many ways an Octopus in disguise, and one that feels equally well in a backpack or on your lap!

# Rovert Moog interview – May 1985 – TECHtalk interview with Robert Moog.

comment

Short links for June 19th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on June 19th, 2008:

# DIY Stompbox: Beavis Board – The beavis board is designed to give you a platform for learning and building. If you can follow along with simple instructions, you can start building and modding a classic and new stompbox circuits.

Beavis Board
Beavis Board on the left, full kit on the right

The beavis board makes it easy to:

  • Build a huge array of stompbox circuits including overdrives, distortions, fuzzes, filters, amplifiers, tremolos, noise generators, oscillators, and more.
  • Learn about the different components and how they work to shape your guitar’s signal.
  • Modify stompbox designs to tailor your sound.
  • Easily try out your circuits through a true-bypass breakout box.
  • Have a giant buttload of fun.

You can pick up a complete kit for $249 USD, or get just the Beavis Board for $109 USD. That is, when they aren’t sold out… New stock should be available by the end of July.

# BodySurf // Wii Balance Board + Audiosurf + Motion Controls – BodySurf is a script for GlovePIE that rigs up the Wii Balance Board to play Audiosurf. It is full-featured, with a strong focus on player immersion and ease of user interface.

# Elektron-Users: Richard Devine interview – Interview, gear list, imagery, and an exclusive Richard Devine track.

Richard Devine's gear (some of it)

Richard answers What inspires you to compose?:

I find inspiration from many different sources. Sometimes I will be out at an art museum, and see a video installation, short film, or sculpture piece, and it will inspire me to create something. I love late 21st century modern architecture too. I see the skeletal structures of buildings and spaces, and it makes me think of musical structures. I have always believed that there is a close relationship between visual art and music. They are based on the same principals of design, repetition, color, balance, rhythm, tone, texture, etc. I tend to get more ideas from visual references than audio sources.

# New Early Computer Music Discovered; What Was the First Digital Synth? – So, who gets the credit for the first digital synthesis? This particular recording doesn’t change much, in that Bell was never recognized as the first computer-created music – they just happened to have the earliest recordings still available.

# Tim Exile Video – Exclusive | Videos | matthew hodson

Matthew writes:

Here it is! Mr Exile gave a fantastic performance at The London College of Music & Media last year and I have only just gotten around to editing the footage together. Here you can see him at length talk about that fantastically creative live setup he has based on software by Native Instruments – Reaktor. I for one use the same software a lot when I am making electronic music under my bit|bin as I really rate not only its flexibility and ability to build/create anything from a synth to an effects unit but it also sounds great too.

link via NI Kore Minisite @ CDM

comment

Short links for January 1st, 2008

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on January 1st, 2008:

Oh, and happy new year to you!

comment

Short links for November 19th, 2007

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on November 19th, 2007:

Anton Corbijn
Anton Corbijn (photo by Carmen Valino)
  • Lost in the Static – Lost in the Static is a simple little game that uses some surprising aspects of the human perceptual system to create a visible world out of animating static.
  • Foamee – Foamee is a free service that helps track who you owe beers to (and vice-versa) using the popular messaging service, Twitter.
  • CJO – Abstract – Organic agriculture and the global food supply – According to researchers at the University of Michigan, organic farms can produce more than enough food to support the world’s population without converting any additional land to crop production.
  • pantone autumn – Chris Glass collected leaves from a single maple tree to create this pantone autumn image.
comment