Results for Kyma

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Harmony Systems vKiP, control Kyma X Paca or Pacarana with iPad

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Aug 20, 2010 - comment 0 comments
Harmony Systems vKiP

Harmony Systems has released vKiP, an iPad app that expands the controller options for Kyma.

Control Symbolic Sound’s Kyma X Paca or Pacarana sound design system using your iPad!. Conveniently arranged on one screen, vKiP’s controls are optimized in size and layout for the iPad Multi-Touch screen. Adjust faders and rotaries, browse and load in Kyma sound snapshots, plus more! Untether yourself from the computer mouse and screen.

vKiP adjusts for either portrait or landscape orientation, giving you the flexibility to choose your preferred usage mode.

vKiP is Harmony Systems’ latest in its Delora Software family of “v” applications that expand the controller options for Kyma. It uses WiFi and “Midi over OSC” to communicate with Kyma: no other computer “agent” programs, drivers, or utilities are needed. vKiP can be used with any computer and OS supported by Kyma.

vKiP features

  • Manipulate and set Kyma sound parameters through faders and rotaries optimized for touch-screen control.
  • Control eight faders and eight rotaries at a time.
  • Full VCS bank support.
  • Swap fader and rotary controls.
  • Control parameters with normal or fine adjustment mode.
  • Browse or load-in Kyma sound snapshots.
  • Adjust Kyma’s master volume or mute all sound.
  • View current parameter values using Selector buttons.
  • Supports systems with one or multiple Paca(rana)s.

vKiP for iPad is available to purchase for $39.99 USD.

More information: Harmony Systems / vKiP

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ToneBuilder announces Driven Machine Drums Sale

ToneBuilder Driven Machine Drums

ToneBuilder has announced a limited time sale for Driven Machine Drums, an electronic drums sample library, created from an unique blend of 14 drum machines/synthesizers and 9 analog coloration devices.

DRIVEN MACHINE DRUMS highlights the natural sounding punch, depth, and warmth added by a collection of tubes, transformers, and hardware tape emulation.

Driven Machine Drums features

  • 1,820 sounds in 24bit resolution, captured directly from the source using professional-quality cables and A/D converters.
  • Each individual sound has been carefully edited by hand for tight attacks and natural decays.
  • Synthesis sources: Elektron Machine Drum, Symbolic Sound Kyma Capybara, Eventide H8000FW, Korg ER-1, E-mu SP-1200, Oberheim DMX, Emu Mo Phatt, Yamaha DX200, Roland TR909, TR808, TR707, TR606, Vermona DRM-1 MKIII, and Jomox MBase 11.
  • Analog processing: Thermionic Culture Vulture, Anamod ATS-1, Neve 1073 Preamp, Atlas Pro Juggernaut Twin, A-Design EM-Gold, Source + Plus Tube Amp, Empirical Labs Distressor, Moog MF101, and Mutronics Mutator.

Driven Machine Drums is available in two packages:

  • Driven Machine Drums – $37 USD (regular $77), 26 Guru Kits, 24bit Wav/Aif.
  • Driven Machine Drums Deluxe – $47 USD (regular $87), NN-XT, Structure, Kontakt, EXS-24, 24bit Wav/Aif.

This limited time sale is available until April 15, 2010.

More information: Driven Machine Drums

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Symbolic Sound announces Open Sound Control (OSC) for Kyma

Symbolic Sound Corporation has expanded the list of real-time controllers and software that can communicate with its Kyma sound design environment by adding support for Open Sound Control (OSC) to its Paca(rana) sound engine.

By connecting a Paca or Pacarana to the Ethernet, sound designers, musicians, and researchers using Kyma on Windows or Macintosh computers can establish bi-directional communication with OSC-enabled devices and software on the network to control parameters of Kyma sound synthesis and processing algorithms. Open Sound Control (http://opensoundcontrol.org/introduction-osc) is an open communications protocol that delivers higher speeds, greater resolution, and more flexibility than is afforded by the standard MIDI protocol. (For a partial list of software and hardware currently supporting the OSC protocol, please see http://opensoundcontrol.org/implementations).

Doug Kraul, CEO of Harmony Systems, Inc. is enthusiastic about Kyma’s new OSC technology. “OSC is a brilliant addition to the already stellar Kyma sound design workstation”, said Kraul. “It immediately enables exciting new ways to use Kyma on stage or in the studio. But the true impact of this forward looking technology is the new, innovative controllers and applications that OSC makes possible for the Kyma platform”.

Symbolic Sound Paca(rana)
Symbolic Sound Paca(rana) with ethernet port on the back panel

Bidirectional MIDI streams over OSC is available for those who don’t have any OSC-enabled devices or software yet.

Symbolic Sound has announce that several third-party development partners are concurrently announcing new software that supports bi-directional communication with Kyma over OSC:

  • OSCulator: Known as the Rosetta Stone of music controllers, Camille Troillard’s Mac OS X application OSCulator (http://osculator.net) is already familiar to Kyma users who utilize it for sending individual MIDI controls, OSC, and HID control data over FireWire to Kyma. Now, in OSCulator 2.9.2, you can also send OSC messages directly to the Paca(rana) over the network. OSCulator 2.9.2 also implements Symbolic Sound’s Bi-Directional-MIDI-streams-over-OSC protocol, enabling you to send streams of MIDI events from your software directly to Kyma without need for a MIDI interface on your computer and without having to map each controller individually in OSCulator.
  • vM2 and PacaMidi: Harmony Systems, Inc. is offering two new Mac OS X applications in its Delora product line, vM2 and PacaMidi, that incorporate Kyma’s new “MIDI-over-OSC” technology to further enhance and facilitate real-time interaction with Kyma. vM2, a “virtual MotorMix”, enables JazzMutant Lemur owners to enjoy automatic, fully integrated tactile control over Kyma’s Virtual Control Surface. Recently updated to include several exciting new features, vM2 2.0 employs “MIDI-over-OSC” to eliminate the complication of physical MIDI cables and interfaces. PacaMidi, Harmony’s newest product, uses “MIDI-over-OSC” to create a “virtual MIDI interface and patchbay” that adds three merged MIDI inputs and one MIDI output to a Paca(rana). This expands Kyma’s connectivity options, while saving you the expense and complexity of using physical MIDI interfaces, hardware mergers, and numerous cables. For more information see http://www.delora.com.
  • Max & M4L: If you are one of the many artists using Kyma in conjunction with Ableton’s Live and/or Cycling74′s Max, you’ll be happy to hear that Andrew Capon has written a Max external for bidirectional MIDI communication over OSC that works with both Max and Max For Live. For more details, please see: http://www.symbolicsound.com/Learn/AndyCaponMaxExternalOSC

OSC-enabled Kyma X.74 is a free software update for registered Kyma X owners. OSC communication requires the Paca or Pacarana sound engine.

Kyma X.74 also comes with additional features, including an 11-times speedup in the Virtual Control Surface, support for the MOTU UltraLite Hybrid mk3, TC Electronic Impact Twin, and Prism Audio Orpheus converters, track-pad compatible menus, refinements to the Tau resynthesis, and more.

More information: Symbolic Sound

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ToneBuilder updates Driven Machine Drums with Reason NN-XT and Pro Tools Structure support

ToneBuilder Driven Machine Drums

ToneBuilder has included support for Reason NN-XT and Pro Tools Structure for Driven Machine Drums, its electronic drums sample library, created from an unique blend of 14 drum machines/synthesizers and 9 analog coloration devices.

DRIVEN MACHINE DRUMS highlights the natural sounding punch, depth, and warmth added by a collection of tubes, transformers, and hardware tape emulation.

Driven Machine Drums features

  • 1,820 sounds in 24bit resolution, captured directly from the source using professional-quality cables and A/D converters.
  • Each individual sound has been carefully edited by hand for tight attacks and natural decays.
  • Synthesis sources: Elektron Machine Drum, Symbolic Sound Kyma Capybara, Eventide H8000FW, Korg ER-1, E-mu SP-1200, Oberheim DMX, Emu Mo Phatt, Yamaha DX200, Roland TR909, TR808, TR707, TR606, Vermona DRM-1 MKIII, and Jomox MBase 11.
  • Analog processing: Thermionic Culture Vulture, Anamod ATS-1, Neve 1073 Preamp, Atlas Pro Juggernaut Twin, A-Design EM-Gold, Source + Plus Tube Amp, Empirical Labs Distressor, Moog MF101, and Mutronics Mutator.

Driven Machine Drums is available to purchase for $77 USD (includes 26 Guru Kits, 24bit Wav + 24bit Aif), and a Deluxe version is available for $87 USD (NN-XT, Structure, Kontakt, EXS-24, 24bit Wav/Aif).

A free demo pack featuring 100+ sounds is available to download from the ToneBuilder website.

More information: Driven Machine Drums

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Review: ToneBuilder Driven Machine Drums

ToneBuilder Driven Machine Drums

When I first visited the Driven Machine Drums website I thought I had found another one of those silly marketing schemes. You know those sites that promise loads of “fresh” content for cheap, meaning to say they’ll send you a disc with stuff that is old and readily available to download from the internet, free of cost…

Just reading the first few paragraphs on the website immediately triggered my scam alert.

Have you purchased hundreds; even thousands of drum sounds… only finding a handful of gems among the clutter? Are you often irritated when sifting through countless sounds, devastating your creative flow? Do you fight with samples to make them tight, slamming, and club ready… only later to be disappointed in the results? Have you fantasized about the multi-million dollar deal or winning the lottery so you can stack your studio with all the esoteric highend gear? Does your music command you have the latest kit, to gain the advantage and stand apart from the masses?

If you answered “YES!” to any of these questions, then you are in the right place and the right time.

The website even mentions a 30-day no questions asked refund, and then there’s the odd “only 997 copies will ever be available” thing.

The whole thing looked pretty dodgy to me, but my gut feeling was wrong.

The guy behind ToneBuilder and Driven Machine Drums is Nathaniel Shreve, an electronic musician who is passionate about his work. He wanted to make sure to share some interesting things about how the library came to be, and why he feels Driven Machine Drums is different from other drum sample libraries.

Now whether or not you enjoy Nathaniel’s style of writing, the bottom line is: this product is legit and well worth checking out.

What do you get?

Driven Machine Drums includes samples from a variety of synthesis sources:

  • Elektron Machine Drum
  • Symbolic Sound Kyma Capybara
  • Eventide H8000FW
  • Korg ER-1
  • E-mu SP-1200
  • Oberheim DMX
  • Yamaha DX200
  • Roland TR909, TR808, TR707, TR606
  • Jomox MBase 11
  • Vermona DRM-1 MKIII

While in itself that’s a nice list of gear, the special thing about Driven Machine Drums is the way each of the drum sounds was processed with analog coloration hardware. Tubes, tape emulation, transformers and envelope shapers were used to add a distinct “drive” to the samples.

Driven Machine Drums analog processing gear
Analog processing gear used to process the sounds includes the Thermionic Culture Vulture, Anamod ATS-1, Empirical Labs Distressor, Mutronics Mutator, and more.

Nathaniel writes:

See, what makes the MPC3000s and SP1200s so special was the quality of DRIVE added on the input. That drive adds natural compression, limiting, and HARMONIC DISTORTION, making the drums appear louder, warmer, and punchier.

Have you ever heard an acoustic guitar recording vs. a driven guitar recording? Play them at the exact same level and the DRIVEN guitar will appear to be louder.

This is the exact thing that was happening with my drums. They became louder, sharper, and driving without resorting to obscene amounts of limiting.

The Driven Machines Drums samples are categorized in various folders (claps, kicks, snares, etc.) and include a total of 1,684 samples:

  • 362 Kicks
  • 244 Snares
  • 108 Claps
  • 218 Cymbals and Hats
  • 135 Toms
  • 190 Hand Percussion Hits
  • 158 Sticks, Rims, Metals, and Bells
  • 272 Electronic Noises including Bass Boosters

Each folder has a number of subfolders with a descriptive title (e.g. DMD Ana Soft BNS, DMD Hats Fltrd 909) to help you find the type of sound you need.

The samples are available in 24bit WAV and AIFF formats. MPC users will be happy to hear the library also includes 16bit dithered WAV and there are 26 kits for FXpansion GURU.

A Deluxe version also includes Kontakt and EXS24 patches.

Check some of the sounds from the Driven Machine Drums library below.

So what do I think?

Product: Driven Machine Drums by ToneBuilder
Format: 24bit WAV/AIFF, GURU/Kontakt/EXS24
Price: $77 USD ($87 USD for the Deluxe version)

ToneBuilder is taking drum machine sampling to the next level. The sounds of Driven Machine Drums were designed and edited individually using a combination of analog processing gear. This way Nathaniel managed to get an amazing warm and punchy sound, full of that analog character many of us are looking for.

I didn’t find the Kontakt patches very useful as they simply map a (sub)folder of sounds across the keyboard. Handy for auditioning sounds but I think mapping the samples to drum kits would have been more valuable.

Driven Machine Drums is probably just another collection of electronic drum hits to those who think every 808 snare sounds like that one sample they already downloaded from the internet a few years ago. However, if you are serious about your drum hits Driven Machine Drums is certainly worth checking out, especially since there will only be a limited amount of copies sold.

In short, Driven Machine Drums is a great collection of electronic drum hits. High quality sounds with plenty of character to separate it from the competition.

ToneBuilder has a generous 100+ sample pack available to download on the Driven Machine Drums website, and you can get an additional pack of 34 free sounds here.

More information: Driven Machine Drums

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ToneBuilder releases Driven Machine Drums

ToneBuilder Driven Machine Drums

ToneBuilder has announced the release of Driven Machine Drums, an electronic drums sample library, created from an unique blend of 14 drum machines/synthesizers and 9 analog coloration devices.

DRIVEN MACHINE DRUMS highlights the natural sounding punch, depth, and warmth added by a collection of tubes, transformers, and hardware tape emulation.

Driven Machine Drums features

  • 1,684 sounds in 24bit resolution, captured directly from the source using professional-quality cables and A/D converters.
  • Each individual sound has been carefully edited by hand for tight attacks and natural decays.
  • Synthesis sources: Elektron Machine Drum, Symbolic Sound Kyma Capybara, Eventide H8000FW, Korg ER-1, E-mu SP-1200, Oberheim DMX, Emu Mo Phatt, Yamaha DX200, Roland TR909, TR808, TR707, TR606, Vermona DRM-1 MKIII, and Jomox MBase 11.
  • Analog processing: Thermionic Culture Vulture, Anamod ATS-1, Neve 1073 Preamp, Atlas Pro Juggernaut Twin, A-Design EM-Gold, Source + Plus Tube Amp, Empirical Labs Distressor, Moog MF101, and Mutronics Mutator.

Driven Machine Drums is available in two packages:

  • Driven Machine Drums (26 Guru Kits, 24bit Wav + 24bit Aif) $77 USD.
  • Driven Machine Drums Deluxe (Kontakt, EXS-24, Guru, 24bit Wav/Aif) $87 USD.

A demo pack featuring 100+ free sounds is available to download from the website.

More information: Driven Machine Drums

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Short links for September 7th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Headgear Drone Machine by Tristan Shone

# Drone Machines by Tristan Shone.

Drone Machines are custom made machines fabricated from raw materials and utilizing open source circuitry.

The devices draw heavily on aspects of industrial automation, robotics and mechanical tools and devices, focusing on the eroticism of interaction with machine.

The machines require significant force from the performer, aligning he or she with the plodding drone and doom influenced sounds that are created.

# Masonverb by Brian Green: The masonverb is a diy mic with a reverb like effect to it, basically its a glass plate reverb, it was made by building a contact mic into a masonjar which leads to the name.

# Chord Triggering in Ableton Live (Vimeo)

This video shows you how to use Ableton Live’s clips as chord banks and trigger them with one key. It also touches on the following features: Follow Action, Launch Modes, Midi Mapping & Routing, Pitch (midi plugin)

(via)

# The Problem with Digital Music

Interesting article by sound designer Tim Prebble.

Is there a problem with digital music? Its so odd reading about the endless piracy & copyright problems, and how the music industry is apparently suffering & dieing when to me, contemporary music feels more vibrant than ever. Every week I discover new music & not just ‘new’ bands, but often highly evolved music that has existed for a number of years, but for whatever reason I just had never heard before. In many ways I think what I am enjoying is the new democracy where I am more likely to discover a new independent band or composer, than have a new act promoted and/or forced upon me by dinosaurs…

But for the moment lets ignore music of the past & consider contemporary music, music that has been created with no involvement or reliance on the old music industry. What are the problems associated with it?

Youth Music Box

# Youth Music Box – Youth Music – Music is Power

Youth Music Box is a free, interactive musical experience, allowing you to create your own unique track and video using cutting edge technology, all in under 10 minutes!

Youth Music Box is currently living at the Royal Festival Hall, London and is a chance for anyone of any age to take part in making music – whether you’re an accomplished musician or complete beginner.

# Waveformless: 5 Non-Musical Purchases to Improve Your Life in the Studio

Tom Shear lists some things that come in handy in your studio.

Being a musician can be expensive. I tend to break down musical purchases into "sexy" and "non-sexy" categories. Buying a new synth? Sexy. Buying MIDI cables? Non sexy. The thing is, a lot of the time, it's the non-sexy purchases that can make the biggest difference in our day to day lives in the studio. So today I'm going to concentrate on a few of these that I've found particularly important.

d-touch

# d-touch.org – The d-touch sequencer and the d-touch drum machine are fully and freely available for download (Registration needed)! Please try them out and spread the word!

Audio d-touch is a collection of applications for real-time musical composition and performance, with very special user interfaces. The collection includes a drum machine and a sampling sequencer, both are controlled by spatially arranging physical objects on an interactive table surface. Each object represents a sound, and its position with respect to the surface is mapped to certain playback parameters. For example, the horizontal position of an object represents the timing of the sound. The system is extremely low cost and now it can be freely and fully downloaded from http://www.d-touch.org/audio. All is needed to get audio d-touch to work is a standard computer (PC or Mac) with a webcam and a printer.

# Behringer’s Latest Rip-Off Job: Apple.com

Peter Kirn writes:

Look out: Behringer, already a notorious rip-off artist, is taking the “first step in [the] company’s reinvention of online presence.” I shudder to think what the coming steps will look like. But yes, the new site looks a wee bit familiar. It actually gets worse as you dig into the layout.

Is anyone really surprised? Don’t we all know Behringer’s game already?

The Conet Project

# The Conet Project – Recordings of Shortwave Numbers Stations

For more than 30 years the Shortwave radio spectrum has been used by the worlds intelligence agencies to transmit secret messages. These messages are transmitted by hundreds of “Numbers Stations”.

Shortwave Numbers Stations are a perfect method of anonymous, one way communication. Spies located anywhere in the world can be communicated to by their masters via small, locally available, and unmodified Shortwave receivers. The encryption system used by Numbers Stations, known as a “one time pad” is unbreakable. Combine this with the fact that it is almost impossible to track down the message recipients once they are inserted into the enemy country, it becomes clear just how powerful the Numbers Station system is.

(via)

# Infinitely Expandable Sound Computation Engine – Symbolic Sound Announces Software for Chaining Together Two or More Paca and Pacarana Sound Computers Under Control of Kyma Sound Design Software.

CHAMPAIGN IL—August 27, 2009—Symbolic Sound Corporation has expanded the real-time sound-computing power of its Paca(rana) sound engine by making it possible for Kyma sound designers to chain two or more multiprocessor Paca(rana)s together via the built-in A/B Expansion ports. To the Kyma software, a network of Paca(rana)s appears as a single sound computation engine with multiple processors. Kyma automatically detects the number of available processors and schedules the execution of DSP-intensive signal processing and synthesis algorithms across multiple processors.

# Melodica boom sampler instrument – A free Ableton Live Sampler instrument by boomstix.

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