Results for libraries

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'libraries'.

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Short links for August 9th, 2007

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on August 9th, 2007:

  • I’m Elton Johning Today – We’re pleased at CDM to introduce a new verb: to Elton John will hereby mean to unplug from the Web in order to do creative work.
  • Largest-known planet befuddles scientists – The largest planet ever discovered is also one of the strangest and theoretically should not even exist, scientists say.
  • Autodesk AliasStudio Personal Learning Edition – Autodesk® AliasStudio&trade Personal Learning Edition is a special version providing free access for non-commercial use. Autodesk AliasStudio Personal Learning Edition offers almost every feature included in the full commercial version of Autodesk® Studio
  • Woodstock for sale – Mr. Yasgur, now a cultural icon, allowed 40 acres of his 1,100 acre farm in upstate New York, to be used for Woodstock, thus making the musical and cultural event of the century possible.
  • Google News to add user comments – We wanted to give you a heads-up on a new, experimental feature we’ll be trying out on the Google News home page. Starting this week, we’ll be displaying reader comments on stories in Google News, but with a bit of a twist…
  • Cornell University becomes newest partner in Library Project – “In its quest to be the world’s land-grant university, Cornell strives to serve the scholarly and research needs of those beyond the campus,” said Cornell President David J. Skorton.
  • HTTP errors – Inspired by Goopymart’s “Teh Internets”, here’s an illustrated set of common http error codes for use on your blog or site or what have you.
  • Memorial Sculptures – One-of-a-kind, hansculpted, newborn art dolls, created by artist J. Stocks-Dearborn.
  • Boycott Regal Cinemas – Free Culture @ NYU is joining the call for a chain wide boycott of Regal Cinemas over their draconian punishment of a 19 year-old girl caught taping 20 seconds of the Transformers film.

Eric Schneider’s Miniorgan collection

Eric Schneider from Germany collects miniorgans. In April 2005, his collection included about 180 toys.

Silver Star ORP-1803 and Panasonic R-1088
2 items in Eric’s library: Silver Star ORP-1803 and Panasonic R-1088

Eric writes:

Hello to all friends and lovers of rare and vintage musical electronic toys. This is the first museum of lost organs, damned keyboards, childish synthesizers, dusty voice transformers and singing calculators. Most of them are from the 70ies and 80ies.

The library currently has 112 of his organs and you can listen to a few on the audio page.

Link via Pixelsumo

Espresso Book Machine, prints free books on demand

Related: , , , , , Posted in random posts on Aug 01, 2007 - comment 0 comments

The Espresso Book Machine is an ATM for books that prints and binds any title on the spot within minutes from a digital file.

The first Espresso Book Machine was installed and demonstrated at the New York Public Library’s Science, Industry, and Business Library.

Espresso Book Machine
Espresso Book Machine by On Demand Books

Jason Epstein (founder of On Demand Books, LLC) says:

Printed books are one of history’s greatest and most enduring inventions, and after centuries, their form needs no improvement, what does need to change is the outdated way that books reach readers.”

Library users will have the opportunity to print free copies of such public domain classics as “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain, “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville, “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens and “Songs of Innocence” by William Blake, as well as appropriately themed in-copyright titles as Chris Anderson’s “The Long Tail” and Jason Epstein’s own “Book Business.”

The public domain titles were provided by the Open Content Alliance (“OCA”), a non-profit organization with a database of over 200,000 titles. The OCA and ODB are working closely to offer this digital content free of charge to libraries across the country. Both organizations have received partial funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Sounds like a great idea, but what about the cost of paper?

Link via The New Reader