Results for Linux

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'Linux'.

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Togu Audio Line plug-ins for Linux available from KXStudio

Related: , , , , , , , Posted in news on Dec 01, 2010 - comment 0 comments
KXStudio TAL plug-ins

The developer of KXStudio – a KDE desktop aimed at artists, producers, musicians as well as regular users, has released all JUCE (Jules’ Utility Class Extensions) based TAL plug-ins as 32 and 64bit plug-ins for Linux.

Recently a user pointed me at this webpage where there are many free VSTs to download.
Sadly the plugins only have Windows and Mac downloads, but… some have source code available…

So I decided to give it a shot, and try to compile them for Linux. It worked! We now have 4 more great plugins (3 Effects and 1 Intrument) in our list of VSTs for Linux!

Why is this so important?
Because these plugins not only look really good, they sound great too! VST has future in Linux too!

TAL plug-ins available for Linux 32/64bit

  • TAl-Dub-3
  • TAL-NoiseMaker
  • TAL-Filter
  • TAL-Filter-2
  • TAL-Reverb
  • TAL-Reverb-2

More information: Togu Audio Line / KXStudio

Rosegarden, audio and MIDI sequencer for Linux updated to v10.10

Related: , , , , , , Posted in news on Nov 04, 2010 - comment 0 comments
Rosegarden

The Rosegarden team has announced the release of version 10.10 “Betty Prior” of Rosegarden, an audio and MIDI sequencer and musical notation editor for Linux.

Rosegarden is a well-rounded audio and MIDI sequencer, score editor, and general-purpose music composition and editing environment.

Rosegarden is an easy-to-learn, attractive application that runs on Linux, ideal for composers, musicians, music students, and small studio or home recording environments.

Changes since Rosegarden v10.04

  • Several fixes to behaviour of track program/bank change sends in save/load and in interaction with percussion check-box.
  • Permit shift-click on a track header to toggle selection of segments on that track without effecting other selected segments.
  • Improve key highlights in matrix view so as to reflect current segment properly.
  • Add support for basic LADISH level 1.
  • Substantial fixes to audio file handling code to fix a number of problems with the wrong audio clip being played.
  • Fix crash in some cases when opening file dialog if not using default Thorn style.
  • Fix incorrect behaviour of frequency-range parameters in LADSPA and DSSI plugin editors.
  • Fixes to missing-audio-file location logic.
  • Shorten the factory autoload, removing the duplicate sets of tracks at the bottom so that all tracks initially are visible.
  • Fix MIDI recording from devices in which note-on and note-off are not always cleanly paired.
  • Fixes to positioning of playback pointer in matrix.
  • Several substantial fixes to step-recording in matrix and notation.
  • Several fixes to Lilypond export.
  • Numerous fixes to segment editor corner cases that previously could introduce zero-length segments.
  • Several fixes to corner cases that previously could introduce zero-length events or ranges.
  • Fixes to unpredictable behaviour in certain operations involving copying segments.
  • Numerous fixes to behaviour of editing operations in cases where segments overlap with the end of the composition.
  • Make behaviour of Paste Range more predictable.
  • Improvements to chord database and several fixes to fretboard editor.
  • Fixes to avoid zero-duration note events in files.
  • Fixes to toolbar visibility in editing views.
  • Fixes to regressions in action availability.
  • Fixes to updates in notation view, event list editor, matrix editor and rulers.
  • Restore progress dialogs.

Rosegarden for Linux is available to download at no cost.

More information: Rosegarden

Short links for October 20th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Jeremy Ellis rocks MASCHINE

Native Instruments' Maschine promo video featuring Jeremy Ellis. via Matrixsynth

# How to Install ReBirth in Linux, Get a Free Rack of Beat Machines

Peter Kirn writes:

I just picked up a $280 Asus netbook and installed Ubuntu on it. ReBirth seemed a perfect addition; its compact-sized UI, lightweight processing and memory requirements, and simple functions are the ideal companion to a netbook. And, thanks to Propellerhead, it also happens to be free.

If you stick with Windows, just download and go. On Linux, though, you have to give the installer some help to see the install disc. (Why install Linux? I’m finding Ubuntu is just fine for battery life, and I wanted to take advantage of the OS’ optimizations for netbooks and its flexibility for the work I do, audio and otherwise. Windows 7 Starter, by contrast, I found slow and painfully hobbled.) You’ll need WINE, a Windows compatibility tool, in order to run this Windows app in Linux without virtualization.

Sun Boxes

# Sun Boxes

Sound artist, Craig Colorusso, returns to Western Massachusetts with his latest piece, a solar powered sound installation; SUN BOXES.

For the first three weekends of November Turners Falls River Culture will present Craig Colorusso’s latest piece Sun Boxes. At three locations, allowing the participants to observe the piece evolve as it moves through the town.

  • Nov. 5-7 Lawn of the Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave.
  • Nov. 12-14 Peskeomskut Park, Ave. A + 7th Sts
  • Nov. 19-21 Lawn at the beginning of the bike path, 1st St

Sun Boxes is a solar powered sound installation. It’s comprised of twenty speakers operating independently, each powered by the sun via solar panels. Inside each Sun Box is a PC board that has a recorded guitar note loaded and programmed to play continuously in a loop. These guitar notes collectively make a Bb chord. Because the loops are different in length, once the piece begins they continually overlap and the piece slowly evolves over time.

Participants are encouraged to walk amongst the speakers, and surround themselves with the piece. Certain speakers will be closer and, therefore, louder so the piece will sound different to different people in different positions throughout the array. Allowing the audience to move around the piece will create a unique experience for everyone. in addition, the participants are encouraged to wander through the speakers, which will alter the composition as they move. Given the option two people will take different paths through the array and hear the composition differently. Sun Boxes is not just one composition, but, many.

We are all reliant on the sun. It is refreshing to be reminded of this. Our lives have filled up with technology. But we still need the sun and so does Sun Boxes. Karlheinze Stockhausen once said “using Short-wave radios in pieces was like improvising with the world.” Similarly, Sun Boxes is collaborating with the planet and its relation to the sun.

Colorusso now lives on the South Shore of Boston with a wife and a cat.

Moog Filtatron

# Dan303: Moog Filtatron

Dan on Moog’s Filtatron iPhone app:

I found the Moog filtatron app fun and extremely easy to use.

The sound of the filters and VCO are brilliant, it's hard to replicate analog hardware exactly but for an app running your phone it's very close.

It's cheap too, for just £2.99 you can own your very own moog filter. Combine that with the Amplitube iRig adapter and you have yourself a portable, analog modeled filter and effects unit.

# Talking Piston Honda

Richard Devine writes:

Checking out some new Roms for the Piston Honda tonight. Making the Piston Honda sound like a broken Speak & Spell.

Sound Tamasha - Spectaculicious Music

# Sound Tamasha – Spectaculicious Music (Creative Commons Only)

In this first compilation created by Sound Tamasha that is released under a Creative Commons license, we present a small selection of the artists who collaborated in our project during the last two years. In fact, this release is the first electronic music compilation of Indo-European artist collaborations. The artists featured are: 22ROCKETS, Hamza, Sedat Altinok, B.L.O.T., Vipul Angirish, Andre Wakko, Tiago Oudman, and Ricardo Ferreira.

The best part of it is that you can use it without the usual restrictions of digital music: put it on your laptop, MP3 player, home stereo or car with no copy-protection or legal boundaries. You can share it with your friends, family, or that special girl/boy you might have a crush on. Thanks to the artists who support the distribution of music beyond commercial interests, all the great music comes for FREE!

Download the compiliation here.

Mixxx 1.8.0, free DJ software updated

Mixxx, the free, open source software for performing live DJ mixes, was updated to version 1.8.0.

Developed by a diverse community of DJs, Mixxx is a complete replacement for a conventional “turntables and mixer” DJ setup, and is available for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Mixxx (Deere skin)
“Deere” skin, new in Mixxx 1.8.0

Changes since Mixxx v1.7.2

  • Looping
    • Loop-in, Loop-out, and Reloop/Exit buttons added to our main skins.
    • Loop point indicators on main waveforms and waveform summary displays.
  • Hot cues
    • Most of our skins gained 4 hot cue buttons, and Mixxx now internally supports up to 32 hot cues per deck.
  • A brand new database-powered library, with:
    • iTunes library and playlists access (Windows and Mac OS X)
    • Rhythmbox library and playlists access (Linux)
    • A brand new, faster library scanner
    • Crates!
    • A simple Auto DJ mode, which crossfades to the next track in the Auto DJ queue.
    • Analyze view, which allows you to run bulk BPM detection on your songs
    • Featured Artists bundle (Windows and Mac OS X)
    • Revamped Song Properties dialog
    • Re-arrangeable, hide-able columns
  • Tons of new artwork:
    • New Deere, Shade, Phoney, and LateNight skins
    • Better descriptions in tooltips and snazzy new look
  • MIDI
    • New PortMidi-based MIDI device backend, supports using multiple devices at once
    • Timers in the MIDI scripting engine
    • New MIDI mappings:
      • Hercules DJ Control e2
      • DJ TechTools MIDI Fighter
      • Reloop Digital Jockey2
    • Updated MIDI mappings:
      • Hercules DJ Control MP3, RMX, MK2
      • Stanton SCS.3d, SCS.3m
      • M-Audio Xponent
      • Behringer BCD3000
      • Vestax VCI-100
      • MixMan DM2
  • Other stuff:
    • A massive rewrite of our internal mixing engine
    • More intelligent disk access to help optimize audio latency
    • Optimized waveform rendering at 30 fps
    • Ramping pitch-bend option, smoothly applies temporary pitch adjustment for nudging
    • Import comment tags from MP3, Ogg Vorbis, and FLAC/WAV metadata.
    • New library and preferences icons
    • Improvements to UTF-8 handling
  • Over 50 bug fixes and more!

More information: Mixxx

discoDSP updates Discovery Linux to R3.3

Related: , , , Posted in news on Jan 25, 2010 - comment 0 comments
discoDSP Discovery R3.3

discoDSP has released version R3.3 of Discovery for Linux, a virtual synthesizer instrument plug-in.

8 oscillators Virtual Analog VSTi Synthesizer featuring 4 layers, 2X oversampling/undersampling, built-in arpeggiator, sync, FM, 8 filter types, panning modulation, stereo delay and gate effects. Imports Nord Lead 2 SysEx data.

Changes in Discovery R3.3 for Linux

  • Fixed high CPU usage when plugin was idle under several configurations.

Discovery is available to purchase for PC, Mac and Linux, priced at 75 EUR / $99 USD.

More information: discoDSP

MusE updated to v1.0

Related: , , , , , , , Posted in news on Dec 24, 2009 - comment 0 comments
MusE

MusE, a MIDI/Audio sequencer with recording and editing capabilities for Linux, was updated to version 1.0.

This is not the beginning, nor the end, but it marks the culmination of 10 years of feature packed and bug ridden development towards the goal of making a good platform for creating music on the Linux platform

Changes since MusE v0.9

  • DSSI + Win VST support.
  • Python remote control API (for wonderful things), some primitive example scripts for live re-sequencing included, more to come.
  • Instrument editor with GS/XG drum controller support.
  • Part cloning.
  • Better bounce operations, with Jack freewheel mode support.
  • Better midi sync output.
  • Midi controller knobs in pianoroll and drum editor.
  • Jack transport master timebase function.
  • External midi filtering support write your midi filters in just about anything, including bash.
  • Denormal protection + limiter.
  • Record looping overdub, replace, mix support.
  • Audio optimizations, less CPU usage.
  • Countless fixes and tweaks, about a 1000 lines in the Changelog, check it for a complete list of blood sweat and tears.

MusE is available to download under the GNU General Public License.

More information: MusE

Short links for December 22nd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Make: Online : Open source hardware 2009

Make’s definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2009.

Make:Online open source hardware 2009

Welcome to definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2009. First up – What is open source hardware? These are projects in which the creators have decided to completely publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files to recreate the hardware – they also allow any use, including commercial. Similar to open source software like Linux, but this hardware centric.

Each year we do a guide to all open source hardware and this year there are over 125 unique projects/kits in 19 categories, up from about 60 in 2008, more than doubling the projects out there! – it’s incredible! Many are familiar with Arduino (shipping over 100,000 units, estimated) but there are many other projects just as exciting and filled with amazing communities – we think we’ve captured nearly all of them in this list. Some of these projects and kits are available from MAKE others from the makers themselves or other hardware manufacturers – but since it’s open source hardware you can make any of these yourself, start a business, everything is available, that’s the point.

# fridgebuzzz electronics MK1 MIDI controller

fridgebuzzz MK1

The MK1 prototype is a user programmable midi controller featuring 32 LED pushbutton switches and 6 touch sensitive copper plate switches.

# satrap activ portable analog synthesizer (YouTube)

Flo Kaufmann shows his “satrap activ” portable analog synthesizer made out of a vacuum cleaner.

It contains 2 cmos based VCO’s , a Moog ladder filter, a 555 based ADSR, a cmos based 8 step sequencer, a PIC based vc to midi interface and a PIC based auto trigger unit. There are 4 tunable knobs on top, mostly to play base lines, and 2 conductable wires, which act as voltage dividers to generate variable tones. the wires do not vibrate. so it is not a cord instrument. satrap activ can also control other synthesizers either by midi or cv/gate interface.

Mark Mosher's Audio Cubes

# Percussa Audio Cubes: Lights & Tangible Interface with Ableton Live and Alchemy

Mark Mosher writes about his Audio Cubes:

I recently added Percussa AudioCubes to my studio and performance rig.

While I’m planning a longer post offering an overview of how AudioCubes work, this is a quick post to mention two applications of AudioCube technology I’ve been experimenting with.

# Larry Cotton’s MIDI Marimba

Larry Cotton’s 3-octave “player marimba” was featured in MAKE, Volume 4. Larry added two MD24 MIDI Decoders and the marimba can now be controlled by any MIDI sequencer or keyboard.

L2Ork (image by CDM)

# An Orchestra of Linux Laptops, and How to Make Your Own Laptop Instrument

Peter Kirn @ Create Digital Music:

For a generation of musicians of nearly every genre, the laptop has become an instrument. It’s easy to take for granted, but the rise of the computer for music has been remarkable. Less than twenty years ago, real-time digital synthesis and audio processing was the domain of expensive, specialized workstations. Now, $700 per seat can buy you a full-blown musical rig, with the computer hardware, gestural input courtesy the Nintendo Wii controller, and even a DIY speaker made from IKEA salad bowls. The next challenge is to make this setup as flexible and reliable as possible. Enter Linux.

Marblephone

# Marblephone

g000ze @ Let's Make Robots writes:

Inspired by Animusic's bodacious films, I was wondering whether a music robot in a much more simple way would be possible to make. Here is what my little boys and I created.

Still unfinished, but already working. Thank you Animusic for activating my imagination building the music machine that I am calling Marblephone.

# Line 6 JM4 Looper Review (with Video)

Joe Glider of Home Studio Corner has a reivew of the Line 6 JM4 Looper pedal:

I’ve always been absolutely fascinated with looper pedals. Any time an artist uses one in a performance, I’m spellbound. As soon as you introduce a looper pedal into your setup, suddenly all the rules change. You’re no longer a solo performer, you’re an entire ensemble. It’s like you brought a recording studio right on stage with you, and now you’re doing an overdub session for all of us to see. Fascinating.

Needless to say, I’ve wanted a looper pedal for years. Thanks to the good folks at Line 6, now I have one!* What I love about the JM4 is that it’s not JUST a looper. It’s an entire guitar workstation. It has both amp modeling and three different selectable effects.

PongThatBeat! (Vimeo)

PingPong sequencer made with max/msp and processing.

# Langjokull, Snaefellsjokull, Solheimajokull – Three glacier ice records, played until they melt.

Short links for October 1st, 2009

energyXT in Linux

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Free, Native Linux Plug-ins, and How to Use Them in energyXT for Linux

Peter Kirn writes:

It’s simply stunning some of the terrific instrument and effect plug-ins available that are now free and open source – yes, free as in freedom, not just freeware. I had commented in the past something along the lines of, “boy, wouldn’t it be great if this now meant, say, a Linux port?” and then went on the business of my daily life, which tends not to include re-compiling plug-ins. But now, the folks of JUCETICE have been busy doing just that, serving up delicious instrument and effect goodness, running native on Linux.

# Flute samples

Cyberworm posts some free acoustic flute loops, shots and fx's. Thanks to Decado/Fluter for playing. 80 samples in all.
Samples are in wav format, 24 bit, 44100 hz, stereo, 46 mb.

mechomaniac Arduino noise box synth

# Arduino noise box synth – an Arduino based step sequencer, synthesizer and sound effects box.

mechomaniac writes:

It was constructed a year ago as a third birthday present, and has recently come back to me for some 'refurbishment' – fresh batteries and some glue to fix LEDs that have been pushed into the box. Not too bad after a year with a small child!

The full source code is available here: http://mechomaniac.com/node/67

# Massive YM2413 Sample Pack (245 Samples)

Sebastian Tomczak recorded a sample pack from a YM2413 chip.

The sample pack consists on 245 samples. These are:

  • 5 drum sounds
  • 16 sounds per instrument, across 15 preset instruments

In the case of all of the pitched sounds, the samples include every C and G pitch from C-2 to G6 (16 in total). Every even-numbered file is a G. Every odd-numbered file is a C. Samples are available in wav and mp3.

Casper Electronics Echo Bender

# Echo Bender V2

Casper Electronics’ Echo Bender is an echo, distortion and experimental, stand alone noise generator.
It’s capable of creating smooth, clean echos as well as delving deep into screeching, noisy realms seldom heard from a traditional echo pedal.

Echo Bender V2 features

  • Coarse pitch
  • Fine pitch
  • Decay
  • Wet volume
  • Dry volume
  • Feedback/distortion amount
  • True bypass foot switch
  • Effect activation indicator LED
  • 9 volt DC Power jack
  • 9 Volt Battery compartment
  • 1/4″ Switching input jack (conserves battery power by switching off power when plug is empty)
  • 1/4″ Output jack
  • External power supply included. Input 120AC, output 9Volts DC. 200mA

# Obsessive Windows 7 Under-the-Hood Guide for Music

Can You Finally Dump XP? Peter Kirn talks about Windows 7 with Noel Borthwick of Cakewalk.