Short links for May 7th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Peacock

# Blushing Boy Peacock

We have been working in a concept for a different type of music instrument. Putting together some feminist theory of music, some love for strange sounding animals, a laser engraver, a bunch of sliders, some orange LEDs and a lot of patience, we created the Peacock.

The Peacock is an instrument for live performace or personal exploration of both live and digitized sounds. You can get sound from an SD card or record it through its mic-in. The sound will be looped and affected in different ways by different effects and digital filters.

# NerdKits – Piezoelectric Sound Meter

To show off microcontrollers and our kits during the event, we built a sound meter which uses the piezoelectric buzzer (included with our USB NerdKit) in reverse, as a microphone. This provides an opportunity to demonstrate a single transistor amplifier, to make the signals from the piezoelectric element big enough for the microcontroller's analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to read.

Casper Electronics Drone Lab

# * Casper Electronics » Drone Lab

The Drone Lab is an analog sound module specially designed for making dense, rich drones.

Peter Edwards writes:

I wanted to design something that could fit in your hand but still deliver some heavy sound.

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Short links for September 10th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on September 10th, 2008:

minitek 2008

# minitek electronic music festival

here it finally is: new york’s electronic music + innovation festival! minitek is going to be slightly different from other festivals you know, even very different at times.

first of all because the festival combines two aspects: electronic music and innovation. while it seems pretty straight forward at first, you’ll see soon that we’re going to explore innovation not only in respect to music but also to other forms of art, science and technology.

Electronic music talents from around the world, a range of experimental art and technology installations, new consumer technologies that have never been applied in a festival context – such as RFID wristbands, and lots more.

Also check here and let Peter Kirn know Who Do You Want Interviewed At Minitek?

# More Cowbell.DJ – More Cowbell is the online spin off of the Saturday Night Live special featuring Will Ferrell as Gene Frenkle, the cowbell player, and Christopher Walken as the music producer, Bruce Dickenson. More Cowbell.dj allows you to cowbell any song you want and even add some Walken to the mix. I got a fever and the only prescription is cowbell.

# Making Music with the Arduino: Wires, Solder, and Sound Round-Up

Michael Una writes:

I received my Arduino Diecemila in the mail last week and have started to experiment with using it to synthesize audio and video. I’m not very experienced with programming microcontrollers, so I’ve been doing a lot of research to see what’s out there, and it’s greatly encouraging to see that people are taking this little kit in fun directions.

# Pipe Organ Chair – This is a pipe organ chair that plays a tune when you sit down (insert your musical furniture joke here).

# Advanced Mega-Round-Up: Going Microtonal with Synths

Peter Kirn writes:

Digital software instruments give you opportunities to explore new sounds and timbres, so why not add tuning to the list? Kore@CDM contributor and sound designer Eoin Rossney helps us navigate the potentially intimidating world of microtuning. Microtonal sound simply refers, generally, to tunings beyond the now-standard 12-Tone Equal Temperament we find on modern pianos. First off, microtuning doesn’t have to sound dissonant or “out of tune” – like other choices with synthesis, it can simply give you some new sonic abilities. Native Instruments’ synths are well-suited to the task, as many having tuning capabilities built-in. If you’re using plug-ins to assist your microtonal voyage, Kore is a natural with its plug-in hosting capabilities. But the most important thing is just to dive in somewhere and see what happens – with no physical instrument to retune, it’s something anyone can do.

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ArduinoSynth – 12-note monophonic synth

Narbotic has posted some info on the ArduinoSynth, his first attempt at microcontroller programming.

ArduinoSynth @ Narbotic
ArduinoSynth @ Narbotic

From Narbotic:

So far it’s a 12-note monophonic synth with transposition selection via one 10K pot. I’m using a gutted toy keyboard for the switches and a simple low pass filter to smooth the output a bit.

Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for artists, designers, hobbyists, and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments.

Link via Make:Blog

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