Results for National Geographic

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'National Geographic'.

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Short links for December 5th, 2007

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on December 5th, 2007:

  • Gibson Robot Guitar – The guitar is tuned by tiny servo motors that tune all strings in no more than five seconds.
Gibson Robot Guitar
Gibson Robot Guitar

CatCam: Adventures of Mr. Lee

If you’ve ever seen National Geographic’s Crittercam you might already have an idea what this is about.

J. Perthold has made a CatCam, to track the adventures of his cat, Mr. Lee.

… I thought about our cat who is the whole day out, returning sometimes hungry sometimes not, sometimes with traces of fights, sometimes he stay also the night out.
When he finally returns, I wonder where he was and what he did during his day. This brought me to the idea to equip the cat with a camera.

And so he did. A modified VistaQuest VQ1005 Digital Keychain Camera was hooked up to a controller and put into a protective case.

Mr. Lee did the rest!

Mr. Lee CatCam
Some shots from Mr. Lee’s CatCam

Check the CatCam webpage for more images of the adventures of Mr. Lee.

Link via Boing Boing

Rare “Rainbow” Spotted Over Idaho, amazing photo

Related: , , Posted in random posts on Jun 29, 2006 - comment 0 comments
Rare Rainbow Spotted Over Idaho

From National Geographic:

Known in the weather world as a circumhorizontal arc, this rare sight was caught on film on June 3 as it hung over northern Idaho near the Washington State border.

The arc isn’t a rainbow in the traditional sense—it is caused by light passing through wispy, high-altitude cirrus clouds. The sight occurs only when the sun is very high in the sky (more than 58° above the horizon). What’s more, the hexagonal ice crystals that make up cirrus clouds must be shaped like thick plates with their faces parallel to the ground.

When light enters through a vertical side face of such an ice crystal and leaves from the bottom face, it refracts, or bends, in the same way that light passes through a prism. If a cirrus’s crystals are aligned just right, the whole cloud lights up in a spectrum of colors.

This particular arc spanned several hundred square miles of sky and lasted for about an hour, according to the London Daily Mail.

Simply beautiful.