Results for piezo

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'piezo'.

Note: Use the search form in the top right if you're looking for something specific.

  

Stephan Vankov intros Pulse Surface Controller System – Finger Taps to MIDI

Stephan Vankov has launched Pulse, a surface controller system comprising a piezo mic and a software interface allowing you to play virtual instruments by finger tapping.

At the core of all music creation lies a pulse. In an age of gear-overload, many of us have forgotten the most effective and intuitive pulse generator – a finger tap.

The Pulse Controller is a hardware / software solution that liberates computer-based musicians and performers from conventional input devices by allowing a surface – i.e. desk, laptop, objects and more – to become a playable MIDI controller. An included piezo microphone coupled with a simple yet powerful software interface converts acoustic impulses into MIDI Note messages for playing your software instruments in an intuitive, responsive and connected manner.

Pulse Surface Controller System

Pulse Controller features

  • Piezo microphone and powerful software interface.
  • Attaches to any surface via integrated suction cup (velcro strips also provided).
  • Connects to external audio device or built-in audio inputs (1/4″ and 1/8″).
  • Velocity-sensitive and highly responsive.
  • Low-latency performance.
  • Compatible with all software that accepts MIDI Note messages (Cubase, Ableton Live, Pro Tools, VST/AU plug-ins, etc).
  • Generate fixed note or random notes in a selected scale, with control of octave, octave width, root pitch and 21 Scales.
  • Fixed note length and note choke modes.
  • Store and recall presets.
  • Keyboard shortcuts for quick access to presets and important controls.
  • Mac OS 10.5, 10.6, 10.7 compatible (Windows / Ableton Live users, please contact us about M4L version).

The Pulse Surface Controller System is currently available for Intel Mac only, priced at $59 USD (+ $5 USD shipping within USA). A 1/4″ to 1/8″ audio input adapter is available for an additional $5 USD.

Note that shipping is currently limited to US orders. International shipping will be available soon.

More information: Pulse Surface Controller System

comment

Short links for January 20th, 2010

Some interesting things I found recently:

# bassdll – An arduino piezo buzzer sound engine by Drew Crawford.

Source code available at github

# ISM / DUBBHISM: impulse responses

Tony Dubshot wrote in to share some of the unusual but usable, hi quality impulse responses he is offering on his Dubshot website. Includes: RE-201 Roland Space Echo impulse responses (25-200 BPM), The Quantum Hall Effects (impulse responses from nanospace), and 60 Classic and King Tubby style spring reverb impulse responses.

# Charting the Beatles – Exploration of Beatles music through infographics.

Charting the Beatles
Charting the Beatles – Authorship and Collaboration

Michael Deal writes:

These visualizations are part of an extensive study of the music of the Beatles. Many of the diagrams and charts are based on secondary sources, including but not limited to sales statistics, biographies, recording sesion notes, sheet music, and raw audio readings.

# Circuit Bending the Bliptronic 5000

Michael Una circuit bends his Bliptronic 5000:

and while I was sad that there was no active synthesis, I’m pretty satisfied with the results.

# MISA digital guitar

The MISA digital guitar is a minimalistic looking MIDI controller.

# Teenage Engineering’s OP-1 Instrument: Hands-on, Videos, Why it’s Different

Teenage Engineering OP-1
Teenage Engineering OP-1, portable synthesizer and controller

Peter Kirn spent some hands-on time with the current prototype of the OP-1 and had a talk with the developers of Teenage Engineering.

mtXcontrol

# mtXcontrol

mtXcontrol by Tobias Bielohlawek is an editor written in Processing to easily create image sequences for several output devices containing multicolor LED matrix.

mtXcontrol Editor auto detects and connects to your device. Once connected, you can draw points, lines & rows in different colors, create multiple frames and manipulate them. Add, delete, move, fill, copy & paste of frames is supported. Play all frames by different speed, realtime update the device and save your work as image file. If supported (e.g. Rainbowduino), update the sequence on your device and run it standalone. One special feature is typing letters and numbers. Future versions aim to support multiple devices, different color depth and many more.

# Elektron Monomachine drum samples

Some new free samples from Cyberworm: 156 drums, clicks, noised and rattles from Elektron Monomachine (wav format, 24 bit, 44100, stereo, 12 mb)

Also from Cyberworm: Ensoniq VFX/SD patches, 85 banks and 709 single patches for Ensoniq SD, VFX, VFX-SD. Only Ensoniq SD 100% compatible! In VFX or VFX-SD some patches might not work (or work incorrectly)!

comment

Short links for September 3rd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Tactile Metronome – Wayne and Layne

Wayne and Layne Tactile Metronome

The Tactile Metronome is a tap-controlled metronome and "beat looper." "Syncopation machine." "Metronome with an attitude."

You tap the piezo speaker to set the frequency. The display shows the beats per minute, and the two buttons adjust the speed.

"Ehhh." "Boring," you say. Not so fast!

You can tap patterns into it, currently up to 12 beats long. As long as you tap the pattern in three times, it jumps in and continues beeping in that rhythm. The metronome can beep in three different tones, so you can play with more than one at a time.

Tactile Metronome features

  • Easy to assemble kit makes for a great learning experience. All parts are easy-to-solder through-hole, with no tiny surface mount parts.
  • Fully open-source design means that everything is freely available and ready to be hacked, including the circuit schematic, PCB layout, part list, and microcontroller firmware.
  • Piezoelectric speaker is used as the pattern input, by simply tapping in the tempo or pattern. Once the metronome learns your pattern, it starts beeping with the same piezo element.
  • Seven-segment displays provide feedback in the form of beats-per-minute (BPM) readings.
  • Custom, professionally-made PCB provides a solid base for happy tappers. All circuit connections are routed on two layers without the use of vias, reducing confusion while assembling.
  • A Pre-programmed Microcontroller means you don’t need a specialized microcontroller programmer to get started with the Tactile Metronome. If you want to experiment with modifying the firmware, an in-circuit serial programming (ICSP) header is provided to enable easy re-programming.

# Stereoklang – Reason Refills – We have been collecting free or demo Reason Refills for over 7 years and of course we are happy to share them with the rest of the world.

All Reason Refills you will find on this site are non-pirated this means that they are free to use in your music production, however we of course encourage you to visit the orginal sites for more information where available.

Circuit bending work station

# Circuit bending work station

Matt the modulator built a deluxe substitution box for experimenting with different resistor & capacitor values for circuit bending.

Circuit bending work station

  • Resistance pots (4k7, 100k, 1m).
  • Capacitance – 12 caps selector poly 47-pf, 100-pf, 470-pf, 1-nf, 4n7 nf, 10-nf, 100nf, 1-uf, 1uf elec 1uf, 4.7uf, 10uf, 100uf.
  • LED.
  • Signal tracer simply a 1w amp maplin kit to trace audio signal in a circuit.

# Drum processing with Depeche Mode (YouTube)

Kerry Hopwood is the Live Programmer/Musical Director for Depeche Mode. When it comes to staging a live DM show, theres no cutting corners. Kerry puts it simply: We need to use tools that work. In concert, Kerry and Depeche Mode rely on Ableton Live as an integral component of shaping the bands drum sound. In this movie, shot at a concert in Berlins Olympiastadion, Kerry discusses the advantages that Live offers for on-stage sound processing.

Giant LED board

# Giant LED Board project

A project featuring Evil Mad Scientists’ Peggy 2.0.

We built a giant LED board, about 6.5×6.5 feet, with 900 LEDs using ping-pong balls as diffusers. It can play Conway's Game of Life, Pong, and Sketch mode that allows you to create a starting pattern for Life. We output board state information to a MIDI board that allows us to make music based on what is displayed. This gets interesting with Life, creating minimalist generative music.

See it in action here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zu5ORo3Im1g

# Free Samples: The Icicle Session – Kent Williams has a new free set of samples.
Kent writes:

Last winter I went out and tapped on icicles hanging down from our eaves over the front porch. And apparently I cut it up into a sample set and didn’t do anything with it. These I release into the public domain. Knock yourself out.

# mOne – Open source step sequencer

mOne
  • Hardware Step Sequencer
  • 8 tracks of 8 patterns with 16 steps each
  • Each track can have its own MIDI-Channel (In, Out)
  • Internal resolution of 24 pulses per 1/4 note (PPQN)
  • Recording through external MIDI-equipment
  • External and interal synchronisation (Play, Stop, Resume, Clock)
  • Modify the sequence during playback
  • Open-Source software concept
  • Programmed with Arduino IDE
  • Based on Atmel ATmega1280
  • USB interface for communication with the PC / MAC
  • MIDI interface (MIDI input, MIDI output)
  • 28 silicon buttons, 2 rotary encoders with confirmation and an LCD display

# Röyksopp ‘Tricky tricky’ remix comp

This is yet another shabby attempt at giving something back to our fans – or rather get our fans involved in our shabby doings… Yes, this is an invitation to all of you dedicated souls out there who want to take part in the Röyksopp legacy!

Röyksopp Tricky Tricky Remix

We feel that track “Tricky Tricky” has so much potential, it deserves a life outside the album. Not only is this a chance at beating us at our own game, you also get to mess around with Karin Deijer-Andersson’s extraordinary vocals! Now, how about that?!?

For those about to remix – we salute you!

Señors B + B

comment

Short links for May 7th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Peacock

# Blushing Boy Peacock

We have been working in a concept for a different type of music instrument. Putting together some feminist theory of music, some love for strange sounding animals, a laser engraver, a bunch of sliders, some orange LEDs and a lot of patience, we created the Peacock.

The Peacock is an instrument for live performace or personal exploration of both live and digitized sounds. You can get sound from an SD card or record it through its mic-in. The sound will be looped and affected in different ways by different effects and digital filters.

# NerdKits – Piezoelectric Sound Meter

To show off microcontrollers and our kits during the event, we built a sound meter which uses the piezoelectric buzzer (included with our USB NerdKit) in reverse, as a microphone. This provides an opportunity to demonstrate a single transistor amplifier, to make the signals from the piezoelectric element big enough for the microcontroller's analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to read.

Casper Electronics Drone Lab

# * Casper Electronics » Drone Lab

The Drone Lab is an analog sound module specially designed for making dense, rich drones.

Peter Edwards writes:

I wanted to design something that could fit in your hand but still deliver some heavy sound.

comment

Short links for August 20th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on August 20th, 2008:

AtomoSynth: Mochika2

# AtomoSynth: New Mochika2. MIDI Sync

Mochika2 features

  • One square and saw waveform VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) with a huge pitch range, from subsonic to ultrasonic sound.
  • One square and triangle waveform LFO (low frequency oscillator), that modulates the VCO for the vibrato effect creating old school arcade Atari-like sounds.
  • White noise generator that triggers the VCO and can create percussion like sounds.
  • 8 step Sequencer with note on/off switch and pitch knob for each step .
  • It has a 1/4 inch audio output, 1/4 inch CV Output (to control other analog gear).
  • A MIDI input to sync the Mochika with any midi device sending midi clock signals, the mochika can sync 1,2,4 and 8 times the tempo of the master clock midi device.
  • 1 ultra bright red led that indicates the LFO Rate, and 8 red leds to indicate the step that is being played. Very useful when you play it on a dark stage.

# Negotiated Project B: Live Gigging Visualisation System – Check Luke McGowan's real-time music visualisation system.

# How-To: Hack a ThingamaKIT – The ThingamaKIT is an anthropomorphic analog synthesizer kit from Bleep Labs. Using "LEDacles", photoresistors, knobs, and switches, it generates interesting high pitched vocalizations. Bleep Labs sent us a review unit and this article shares our experiences building and using the kit. We've also included a tutorial on making some hacks, modifications, and circuit bends to it. Skip to the end to see a video of our hacked kit in action.

# Arduinome: An Arduino-Based Monome Clone, Behind the Scenes – A Monome clone based on the Arduino microcontroller.

The “Arduinome” gifts the Monome with two new possibilities. First, it’s a breakthrough on the availability front: at a time when official Monome kits are backordered, it makes it easier to make your own Monome on a budget. Second, it makes hardware hacking on the Monome far easier, by allowing people to make microcontroller-level modifications on the relatively friendly Arduino platform. (The Arduino was designed not for electrical engineers, but for artists just dipping their toes into electronics, even for the first time.)

Cell Phone Disco

# Cell Phone Disco – Cell Phone Disco is a surface that visualizes the electromagnetic field of an active mobile phone.

Several thousand lights illuminate when you make or recieve a phone call in the vicinity of the installation. Cell Phone Disco makes an invisible property of the environment perceptible to our senses. It reveals the communicating body of the mobile phone.

# Machinecollective.org public beta – full launch soon – Machinecollective is about physical computing, hardware prototyping, (remote) personal manufacturing, human/machine interaction and control surface development. Machinecollective is you, me and the machines, connected through this online community. Machinecollective is a public experiment, with community driven open source hardware as a foundation for further exploration and development.

# DS-10 US Preorder Available; US Ship Date 9/30 – Korg’s DS-10, a synth for your Nintendo DS handheld, is now available for preorder in the US from amazon.com.

comment

Short links for May 16th, 2008

Some interesting things I found on May 16th, 2008:

# Speaker Synth – A five-speaker array with no external audio input, created by Lesley Flanigan. The only components in the system are the instrument's speakers, piezoelectric microphones, amplifying circuits, and the hands of the performer.

Lesley Flanigan Speaker Synth
Lesley Flanigan with Speaker Synth in performance at Monkey Town, New York City, January 2008

From the project page:

Speaker Synth is played by positioning individual piezo microphones with their corresponding speakers and manipulating their associated on/off and volume controls to induce a variation of feedback effects. During the performance, samples from both Speaker Synth and a vocalist are captured and sequenced to build a dense sonic pallet of rhythms and melodies. The performance explores music making through structuring noise, highlighting relationships between analog and digital sound synthesis and between human voice and the voice of an instrument.

Check Lesley’s website for audio and video performances and more cool projects.

# Tonefloat – A bit of a mutant mobile milkbottle xylophone. Each bottle has a small electrical hammer behind it, which is 'played' by a midi keyboard or drum machine, and a few strings of wire 'n chips.

# Plague Bearer – designed to infect, corrupt and pervert a signal beyond recognition. It contains four Voltage-Controlled Resonant Bandpass filters that were designed with the goals of maximum signal alteration and maximum parameter controllability.

# Steppers – Steppers were designed to get kids up on their feet, moving, and playing with sound and music. An external sensor sandal is worn over a child’s shoes, noting each footstep, and, in real time, playing back sound effects/music to compliment their movement.

# MIDI Glockenspiel – Using an Arduino make a computer controller MIDI Glockenspiel.

# Mozart from Scrap-Made Mechanical Glockenspiel – A weight-driven automatic glockenspiel made from assorted recovered materials.

# Toriton plus prototype: first look – A more complex version of the Toriton musical instrument. It involves using five lasers instead of just the one.

comment

Short links for February 7th, 2008

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on February 7th, 2008:

  • Musicthatmakesyoudumb – Correlation of musical tastes and SAT scores. Duh!
  • cbbrakedrum – The BrakeDrum is an attempt at making a drum pad system based on circuit bend toys. It consists of 4 drum pads with piezo elements in them and a box with 5 bend toys, 4 almost identical steering wheel toys and a small beat box toy.
BrakeDrum
MikMo’s BrakeDrum
  • Question Mark Album – Timothy Preut (t1mp) delivers another great album. Free download, check it out! (make sure you check Soulphonic as well…)
  • Pre-owned bookmarks – Collected over the years from books purchased at flea markets, garage sales, used bookstores, etc.
  • DIY Harmonica Mic 3 – Harmonica mic made from scrounged pieces of other items.
comment