Results for programming

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Analog Box, audio synthesizer / visual programming environment now open source

Andyware Analog Box

Andyware has announced that Analog Box 2 is now available as open source software.

Analog Box is an open-source, circuit based, modular software synthesizer. You put sound objects on the screen, connect them together, listen and adjust. When you find something you like, you can record it to a wav file, or just save the circuit and play it again later.

ABox is somewhat like the vintage synth’s of the ’70′s in that there are separate modules with lots of patch cords, knobs, buttons and displays. But you also get the computational ability offered by modern CPU’s. Features like FFTs, Differentials and Digital Control open up realms of sound design never dreamt of before. With the advanced capabilities offered by VSTi, USB/HID, MIDI and Directshow you could conceivably play your favorite video soundtrack through a plugin adjusted by a glove controller.

Analog Box 2 is available under the GNU GPL v3 license.

More information: Analog Box

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Short links for March 14th, 2011

Some interesting things I found recently:

Arcophone Mk II

# Arcophone Mk II

From the Perth Artifactory:

Owing to the Arcophone Mk I being stuck somewhere on the Nullabor owing to damage to train tracks from the recent rains.

As we had a gig at Scitech we needed a new Arcophone, using the prototype batch of v1.2 coil drivers, Brett, Simon & Daniel spent the better part of the last week building the Arcophone Mk II. The case was designed and cut by Simon Kirkby and the electronics designed and assembled by Brett Downing and Daniel Harmsworth.

More on the Acrophone here.

# A Gorgeous Compilation Benefits Cancer Research; Co-Creator Explains

Peter Kirn writes:

“Gem Drops” is a rich, varied compilation covering “experimental electronic hip-hop inspired” music, with artists such as Anenon, yuk., Juj, Devonwho, Shigeto, and Sumsun. The 21 tracks were selected by curator Aaron Meola. It’s the sixth release from the collective Dropping Gems, and 100% of revenue will go to the American Cancer Society.

Pay what you want for the download; a “very limited” run of handmade CDs with artwork will go to people who donate US $15 or more.

# Using EXE files to create found audio

Turning data strings like DNA and what-not into audio can produce interesting results. YouTube user r2blend says, "If you import an EXE file into an audio program as audio data, you hear all kinds of cool stuff. The most awesome by far for me was MS Paint." Fisco130 then made a club remix of the MS Paint data audio. Wonder if any scans of great works of art contain secret music? Does malware translate to sad trombone sound, or Rick Astley?

# 10 Handy Programming Tips for ReFX Vanguard

Tom at Waveformless is sharing programming tips:

If you haven't checked it out yet, head on over to the Programming Tips section of the Waveformless-Soundware site for 10 random programming tips on programming your own sounds for ReFX Vanguard.

The plan is to post programming tips for different softsynths as I release new soundsets. And yes, I am hard at work on the next release. No idea when it will be done. I'd rather get it right then get it out right now.

# Chaircrusher – For Delia Derbyshire 2010-03-10

Free 5-track album by Kent Williams.

Chairchruser For Delia Derbyshire 2010-03-10

This EMS Putney came into my hands when I purchased it from Iowa City South East Junior High School in 1997. It is one of the unique artifacts of electronic music. The Putney & it’s close relative, the attache-case-housed Synthi, were workhorse synths at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, and was a favorite of musicians like Brian Eno, Pink Floyd, and other Space Rock bands of the 70s.

It’s sonic character derives in large part from the cheapness of the design and construction. Moog Synthesizers were laboratory grade audio equipment; the Putney is cheap and difficult to use in a traditional musical context. And yet it was seductive. It’s limitations and imperfections enlarged musican’s ideas of what sounds could be musical.

Delia Derbyshire was one of the pioneers of electronic music during and after her tenure at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. She was both a gifted composer and an audacious and precise engineer. Since seeing her in documentaries, and hearing her music I’m both awed by her and have a synth-geek’s crush on her. She was on my mind as I recorded these pieces, and I dedicate them to her memory.

The 5 parts of this piece were recorded in one evening, with no editing or overdubbing. The Putney was plugged into the Stereo Memory Man pedal, and the pedal was plugged into my computer.

The only post processing applied was normalization. These recordings are as close to the original, raw sound of the instrument as I could make them.

# Somatic Circuits VC-303

The VC-303 modular bass synthesizer, the worlds first and only TB-303 synth module.

100% clone of the classic bassline synth in a modern modular format. just like a 303 only modular.

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Outsim SynthMaker updated to v2.0.2

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Feb 21, 2011 - comment 0 comments
Outsim SynthMaker

Outsim has released version 2.0.2 of SynthMaker, an audio programming tool for Windows.

This release contains some final corrections to the automatic stage conversion.

Most of the changes apply to Assembler components so if you’re not using these then you won’t be affected. The main point of the corrections made is to ensure that older files containing Assembler components will have any stage1 declarations automatically changed to the new default of stage2.

Also in this update they’ve brought in a new component which was previously on the R&D list. The Save Wave component allows you to save to a wave file. They’ve improved this component compared to the R&D version by adding sample format options and fixed the few remaining bugs too.

Finally the automatic update check had a few issues with the last release. These should be resolved now although anyone moving from version 2.0 or those who grabbed an early 2.0.1 may see an incorrect product name on the update dialog box. This has no effect on the process and has been corrected in 2.0.2 ready for 2.0.3.

SynthMaker for Windows is available to purchase starting at £95 GBP for the Enterprise edition. A free version is also available to download from the Outsim website.

More information: SynthMaker

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Outsim releases SynthMaker 2, audio programming tool updated

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Dec 22, 2010 - comment 1 comment
Outsim SynthMaker

Outsim has released SynthMaker 2, an updated version of its audio programming tool for Windows.

The headline feature is Multi Sample Support. For a long time creating sample based products in SynthMaker has been an intricate and time consuming process. The new Multi Sample modules change all of this and make the process an absolute breeze.

In addition to Multi Sample support we have a fresher look, a refined filter bar, a host of small changes and enhancements under the hood and a collection of new modules and primitives to make life easier. There are enhancements to the Exe export, new code component functions, support for Wiimote input and some big improvements to host compatibility particularly in Steinberg Cubase.

There are other changes too. You’ll see that the downloads are all accessible through the forum now. So you only need to log in once and everything is in the same place. Also we have a new product structure including a FREE version which has no time restrictions. There are other limitations of course but they are generous in allowing you to explore the software fully before deciding to buy.

When you make that decision you can choose between the slightly limited Enterprise or the all singing, all dancing Professional Edition. All Standard and Personal edition users who upgrade will move to the Professional edition.

SynthMaker 2 for Windows is available to purchase for £95 GBP (Enterprise) / £195 GBP (Professional).

More information: SynthMaker

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Create Digital Music launches MeeBlip, hackable digital synthesizer

MeeBlip

Create Digital Music has introduced the MeeBlip, a digital MIDI mono synthesizer designed by James Grahame of Reflex Audio and Retro Thing.

It’s designed to be affordable, hackable, and most of all, playable. It’s an open source hardware instrument, but it isn’t just for hackers. You can unpack it, do some very basic assembly of the complete kit, and be making sounds from a MIDI keyboard or other controller within minutes.

And if you are interested in hacking it, from simple modifications to reprogramming the sound, we’ll be putting up lots of resources that help you learn how to do that. That said, the reason we’re excited to have our own MeeBlips is simple: we have fun playing them.

MeeBlip features

  • Out of the box, a monophonic virtual analog synth.
  • Eight user-definable knobs and sixteen slide switches, for hands-on control with the immediacy of a classic monosynth.
  • Tasty digital synth sounds.
  • Use it as-is, or use the source code to remap controls or completely redefine the instrument’s architecture.
  • Available ready for simple, solder-free assembly with a case, or as a kit, all on a single board. Build your own, or make a different project with the MeeBlip sound engine.
  • 8-bit digital brain.
  • MIDI input.
  • 4-pole active low-pass antialising filter.
  • Open source hardware. Modify anything, buy some kits and sell your own builds, or make new projects.
  • Complete kits ship with a custom front panel illustrated by Nathanael Jeanneret.

A MeeBlip Quick Build Kit (includes an assembled board, case, and everything you need – no soldering required) ships internationally for $129 USD. A full board kit and bare PC board (with programmed MCU and DAC) are also available at $79 and $39 USD respectively.

More information: MeeBlip

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Renoise 2.6 “Geek Edition” released, multi-platform DAW

Related: , , , , , , , , , Posted in news on Nov 07, 2010 - comment 0 comments
Renoise

Renoise, the multi-platform digital audio workstation software, was updated to version 2.6.

It’s official. We are pleased to announce that Renoise 2.6 is ready for production. Over three months of community driven beta testing has put the software through the ringer. User feedback has resulted in our most innovative release to date. Rock solid stable, as usual.

Changes in Renoise v2.6

  • Script everything using a truly open API: Lua is a light-weight programming language, which together with the Renoise API allows you to build add-ons quickly and easily. Lua scripting, introduced as part of the beta cycle in July, has already resulted in a plethora of new tools, as well as native support for the following hardware: AlphaTrack, BCF-2000, BCR-2000, KONTROL49, FaderPort, microKONTROL, nanoKONTROL, Launchpad, Remote SL-MKII, Nocturn, Monome, Ohm64, iPad via TouchOSC.
  • Sample Autoseek: Samples have a new setting, “Autoseek”, which will, when enabled, make them behave like a traditional audio channel. You can start playing back the song at any position, and the sample will automatically seek to the current position in the song without having to be triggered.
  • Open Sound Control (OSC) Server Support.
  • Duplex – MIDI/OSC controller framework.
  • DSSI Support on Linux, 64-bit Linux Version.
  • Support for CAF, AIFC, SND and AU Files.
  • Linux & Mac OSX Performance Tweaks.
  • Minor usability and functionality refinements galore!
  • The full scoop, here: http://www.renoise.com/about/what-s-new-2-6/

Renoise is available to purchase for Linux, Mac, and Windows, priced at 58 EUR excl. VAT.

More information: Renoise

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Steinberg VST3 plug-in development kit updated

Related: , , , , Posted in news on Jul 27, 2010 - comment 0 comments
Steinberg VST3 SDK

Steinberg has released version 3.1 of its VST3 plug-in development kit.

Used by industry leading companies such as Waves, Brainworx and Vienna Symphonic Library to create stunning new plug-ins and exciting software instruments, Steinberg’s VST3 has rapidly become the most advanced standard for today’s plug-in development.

“This new VST3.1 update extensively enhances the technical capabilities of VST3 by offering important functionalities that dramatically reduce the development efforts,” comments Timo Wildenhain, product marketing manager at Steinberg.

VST3.1 comes with two convenient “wrapping” tools, enabling VST3.1 plug-ins to be transformed into the Audio Unit format as well as – for older DAWs – into the VST2.4 standard. This allows a maximum flexibility and reduces the porting time. Further features are the support of MIDI poly pressure, a future proof Mac 64-bit test host as well as four new interfaces, including time accurate parameter group editing, delayed opening of the plug-in editor while loading a project/preset, “dirty status” allowing the plug-in to communicate generic changes to the host and several editor features like the set knob mode to open the about or help window. More sample code and an extended documentation rounds out the VST3.1 package.

More information: Steinberg / Developer area

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