Results for research

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TC-Helicon and Sennheiser join forces

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Jan 15, 2013 - comment 0 comments

Vocal processing expert TC-Helicon and audio specialist Sennheiser have unveiled their partnership in the field of vocal effects microphones.

TC-Helicon / Sennheiser

Combining their extensive expertise in creating tools for vocalists and microphone technology, the two companies have been working on joint research projects since 2011, and will launch a joint product at NAMM in January 2013.

“The initial spark for our co-operation was at NAMM 2011, when TC-Helicon premiered a microphone with controls for vocal effects and Sennheiser demonstrated ‘Concept Tahoe’, a beatboxing microphone developed in their research lab in the USA,” says Kevin Alexander, CEO of TC-Helicon. “We had never met, we had never talked – and happened to be showing the same product!”

“We sat down together right at the show in a very open and friendly atmosphere and talked about what we were working on in our respective companies. We immediately saw each other as partners,” says Michael Polten, Director Customer Relationship Management at Sennheiser. “TC-Helicon’s mission is to give singers full control and Sennheiser’s aim is to provide excellent microphones – so our brands were a perfect fit.”

TC-Helicon and Sennheiser started a joint research project, exploring how to interface their products to provide one-stop solutions for singers and musicians – products that will make a real difference for their users. The first results of the commitment will be seen at NAMM 2013, where the companies will launch a joint product.

Kevin Alexander: “We are very excited about this upcoming product bundle. Taking the most innovative microphone brand and the most popular vocal processing brand can only be a good thing for singers.”

More information: TC-Helicon / Sennheiser

Steinberg opening Research & Development center in London

Related: , , , , , , Posted in news on Nov 12, 2012 - comment 2 comments
Steinberg

Steinberg has announced that it is establishing an R&D center in London, United Kingdom, to focus on developing software for the music notation and education markets.

Marketing director at Steinberg, Frank Simmerlein, comments: “Steinberg has a good standing in both the education and composing markets, but we’ve always believed that these markets and its customers deserve the best support we can give. Therefore we are more than delighted to have found the perfect team of extremely talented and experienced individuals to make this possible in the foreseeable future.”

Ben Timms, head of Steinberg’s new London-based R&D team, remarks: “I’m delighted and proud that we are becoming part of the Steinberg family. Our collective expertise combined with Steinberg’s world-leading products and technologies can only mean exciting things for the customers.”

“As musicians, we are very excited to be joining Steinberg, a company whose unrivaled tradition of ground-breaking technologies we have always admired. As a development team, we are looking forward to bringing our extensive experience to bear on a new generation of products, designed by musicians for musicians,” adds Daniel Spreadbury, new product marketing manager for Steinberg.

The London-based office begins its operation in the middle of November, 2012.

More information: Steinberg

iZotope acquires Imagine Research

Related: , , , , Posted in news on Mar 14, 2012 - comment 0 comments
Imagine Research

iZotope has announced the acquisition of Imagine Research, a developer of intelligent audio analysis technologies.

Based in San Francisco, Imagine Research developed MediaMined™, a cloud-based sound similarity and sound-object recognition engine powered by machine learning. The development team has applied their expertise to a range of leading media companies like Skywalker Sound, Pandora, Line 6 and JamLegend (acquired by Zynga). A winner of two National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Awards, Imagine Research has demonstrated both technical and commercial merit.

“The Imagine Research team brings a wealth of technology and experience around intelligent audio analysis, cloud computing, and machine learning,” explains iZotope CEO and co-founder, Mark Ethier, “We’re excited to support the development of MediaMined, and to bring Imagine Research technology into the rest of the iZotope product lines.”

“Given iZotope’s infrastructure and ten years of experience developing, marketing, distributing and supporting products worldwide, joining iZotope is a natural fit for Imagine Research,” says Jay LeBoeuf, founder and CEO of Imagine Research, “iZotope is ideally positioned to help us bring this technology to millions of end-users, and to expand our innovative technology into exciting applications and new markets.”

More information: iZotope

de la Mancha releases ballistic

de la Mancha has announced the release of ballistic, a 15 slot drum sample player designed to get you making beats quickly without a million parameters to adjust.

de la Mancha ballistic
de la Mancha ballistic – the little brother to erratic2

Simple but effective, it boasts flexible midi triggers, sample audition, sample tuning, 4 choke groups, mute/solo options, sample reverse, sample normalisation, a lofi option and several kits of samples donated by many generous sample providers such as Loopmasters, Zero-G, Digital-Redux, Goldbaby, Soniccouture, Real Music Media, Ronnie @ Rekkerd, sink, polyslax and bedroom producers

Even better, all proceeds of sales of ballistic will be donated to Cancer Research UK, helping them in their aim of beating cancer.

ballistic features

  • Plays any 16, 24 or 32 bit stereo / mono WAV files from RAM for low CPU.
  • 15 sample slots, each triggered by user-definable midi note.
  • 4 choke groups, each slot can be assigned to a group and be cut by a group.
  • Each sample can be tuned in tenths of semitones.
  • Mute and solo for each sample.
  • Volume and panning per sample.
  • Sample reverse.
  • Sample slot normalisation.
  • Selectable mono/stereo.
  • Lo-fi option.
  • Sample audition button.
  • Multi-out capable, 15 stereo outputs for routing to individual mixer channels in your host.
  • 637 samples (76 MB) covering acoustic kits, vintage electronic, analogue synth, dubstep, hiphop, breakbeat, 8-bit, glitch, jazz and esoteric noises.
  • Samples donated by Loopmasters, Zero-G, Digital-Redux, Goldbaby, Soniccouture, Real Music Media, Ronnie @ Rekkerd, sink, polyslax and bedroom producers.
  • 21 presets covering various kits.
ballistic audio demo
selection of preset kits, no additional effects or processing – 2.5MB

Ballistic is available a VST instrument for Windows PC for $10 USD. All money received from sales of ballistic will be donated to Cancer Research UK.

More information: de la Mancha

Short links for March 11th, 2008

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on March 11th, 2008:

Furby Gurdy!
Furby Gurdy! Find more cool circuit bent instruments on David Cranmer‘s website.
  • Bloxes – Bloxes are building blocks made of interlocking pieces of corrugated cardboard, folded together. Their unique shape and structure make them exceptionally strong and lightweight — you could build yourself a platform to stand on, and then pick it up and move it wherever you need to.
  • This is your Brain on Jazz: Researchers use MRI to study spontaneity, creativity – A pair of Johns Hopkins and government scientists have discovered that when jazz musicians improvise, their brains turn off areas linked to self-censoring and inhibition, and turn on those that let self-expression flow.
  • Chopper Tremolo Effect – Simple and low quality circuit (built it in about an hour), based on a simple NAND oscillator from an LED Chaser circuit.
  • 35 Fantastic HDR Pictures – Applied carefully, High Dynamic Range-technique (HDR) can create incredibly beautiful pictures which blur our sense of the difference between reality and illusion.

Short links for November 19th, 2007

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on November 19th, 2007:

Anton Corbijn
Anton Corbijn (photo by Carmen Valino)
  • Lost in the Static – Lost in the Static is a simple little game that uses some surprising aspects of the human perceptual system to create a visible world out of animating static.
  • Foamee – Foamee is a free service that helps track who you owe beers to (and vice-versa) using the popular messaging service, Twitter.
  • CJO – Abstract – Organic agriculture and the global food supply – According to researchers at the University of Michigan, organic farms can produce more than enough food to support the world’s population without converting any additional land to crop production.
  • pantone autumn – Chris Glass collected leaves from a single maple tree to create this pantone autumn image.

Shocking Pac-Man: How our brains respond to an approaching menace

Related: , , , , , Posted in random posts on Aug 27, 2007 - comment 2 comments
Pac-Man

Wellcome Trust scientists have identified for the first time how our brain’s response changes the closer a threat gets.

From the article:

When faced with a threat – such as a large bear – humans, like other animals, alter their behaviour depending on whether the threat is close or distant. This is because different defence mechanisms are needed depending on whether, for example, the bear is fifty feet away, when being aware of its presence may be enough, or five feet away, when we might need to fight or run away.

To investigate what happens in the brain in such a situation, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London created a game where subjects were chased through a maze by an artificial predator – if caught, they would receive a mild electric shock. The researchers then measured their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

In short, the closer the threat, the more we rely on primitive behaviour for quick-response survival mechanisms (fight, flee, etc) instead of planning our response strategies to the threat.

Check Science Magazine for more on this.

Link via Boing Boing

Shower curtains: Why they want to be close to you

Related: , , , Posted in random posts on Jul 03, 2007 - comment 0 comments

Why does the shower curtain move toward the water? David Schmidt, an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, came up with an explanation.

SHOWER SIMULATION shows how a vortex forms, creating a pressure drop and sucking the curtain toward the water (David Schmidt)

David says:

Maybe it happened to you this morning: you entered the shower and the curtain moved in to engulf you. I have recently discovered a new explanation for this common phenomenon, thanks to modern fluid-simulation technology.

According to David, a low-pressure region –created as a result of a spray driven vortex– is what pulls the shower curtain in.

The best way to keep the curtain from sucking in is to sew weights in the bottom or use a thicker/heavier curtain (because the force is pretty weak it will hold the curtain in place).

Link via Kottke