Results for Windows

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'Windows'.

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Image-Line updates FL Studio Groove to v1.1

Related: , , , Posted in news on Nov 20, 2013 - comment 0 comments

Image-Line has released version 1.1 of the FL Studio Groove touch-based music production & performance application for Windows 8.

We are pleased to announce the Fl Studio Groove version 1.1 update is available free to existing FL Studio Groove customers.

FL Studio Groove is a Windows 8 music production & performance application available from the Windows App store. Compose, arrange, edit, mix and perform professional quality music.

New features included with FL Studio Groove 1.1 include a Master Effects section with Limiter and 8 band Graphic Equalizer.

FL Studio Groove is available to purchase for $4.99 USD.

More information: Image-Line / FL Studio Groove

John Shield releases WDM ASIO Link Driver v1.2

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Sep 25, 2013 - comment 0 comments
John Shield WDM ASIO Link Driver

John Shield has released version 1.2 of WDM ASIO Link Driver, which now offers multichannel sound support.

Utilising a virtual WDM sound card, this driver allows you to listen or record windows audio from your ASIO driver or host program. You can make the windows audio appear as an input into the host application, or monitor windows audio as an ASIO output bypassing the host application.

Run your DAW in ASIO mode and still listen to windows audio. It’s also possible using the Link driver, to grab your total ASIO output and feed it back into the ASIOVAD stereo mix making it recordable by live windows streaming applications (i.e. live broadcast, voice chat programs).

Changes in WDM ASIO Link Driver v1.2

  • Can now route all 8 channels into host ASIO inputs (was previously limited by the number of real ASIO device inputs).
  • Substantial improvements to timing code making sound more robust under heavy CPU or when running on slower machines.
  • GUI improvements and more info displayed.
  • Auto check for updates (free updates too).

The WDM ASIO Link Driver for Windows is available to purchase for $14.95 USD.

More information: WDM ASIO Link Driver

Roland releases new Windows 8 USB Drivers

Related: , , , , , , Posted in news on Nov 05, 2012 - comment 0 comments
Roland Windows 8

Roland has announced that new Windows 8 USB drivers are available for a whole range of Roland products including audio interfaces, MIDI interfaces, MIDI keyboard controllers and more.

Drivers for Roland’s extensive range of gear are released in concert with operating system updates. This gives musicians the immediate access they need to keep their creative visions flowing through Roland’s leading electronic musical products.

Roland understands the importance of keeping pace with technology, and by forging strong links with Microsoft and Apple, engineering teams are able to build and test new drivers alongside beta OS releases. Starting with the original MPU-40 in 1984, Roland has nearly thirty years of experience creating interfaces for computer music applications and continues to elevate the musical possibilities for musicians all over the world.

More information: Roland / Windows 8 USB drivers

Avid introduces Artist Series support for Windows 7

Related: , , , , Posted in news on Jan 17, 2011 - comment 0 comments
Avid

Avid has announced Windows 7 support for its Artist Series products.

Offering audio customers more options to create flexible, open workflows powered by Avid’s EUCON™ open Ethernet control protocol, Avid® today announced that Avid MC Control v2, MC Mix and MC Transport controllers support the Windows 7 operating system (OS). Now, professionals using Windows-based audio applications that support EUCON, including Pro Tools®, Steinberg Cubase, Cakewalk SONAR, Merging Pyramix, MAGIX Sequoia, and others, can work faster and more intuitively using Artist Series solutions—which offer highly responsive control over software functions, and a tightly connected experience in which the control surface acts and feels like a physical extension of their software.

EUCON is an open, high-speed Ethernet control protocol that allows Avid Artist and Pro Series controllers and consoles to connect to a variety of third party creative audio and video software solutions, making it possible for users to easily switch between multiple applications and workstations, resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective content creation process. Many of the world’s leading software companies have adopted EUCON as a standard for developing and tailoring open implementations that best suit the workflow needs of their customers. Today’s announcement further supports Avid’s commitment to driving openness across the industry.

Windows support will be available to all customers via free download on the Avid website in late January.

More information: Avid

LMMS v0.4.4 released

LMMS (Linux MultiMedia Studio)

Version 0.4.4 of LMMS (Linux MultiMedia Studio) has been released.

LMMS is a free cross-platform alternative to commercial programs like FL Studio®, which allow you to produce music with your computer. This includes the creation of melodies and beats, the synthesis and mixing of sounds, and arranging of samples. You can have fun with your MIDI-keyboard and much more; all in a user-friendly and modern interface.

LMMS features

  • Song-Editor for composing songs.
  • A Beat+Bassline-Editor for creating beats and basslines.
  • An easy-to-use Piano-Roll for editing patterns and melodies.
  • An FX mixer with 64 FX channels and arbitrary number of effects allow unlimited mixing possibilities.
  • Many powerful instrument and effect-plugins out of the box.
  • Full user-defined track-based automation and computer-controlled automation sources.
  • Compatible with many standards such as SoundFont2, VST(i), LADSPA, GUS Patches, and full MIDI support.
  • Import of MIDI and FLP (Fruityloops® Project) files.

LMMS binaries are available for Windows and Linux.

Visit LMMS for more information.

Roland releases 64-bit drivers for Windows Vista

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on May 08, 2009 - comment 1 comment
Roland V-Synth GT

Roland has announced the availability of 64-bit drivers for Windows Vista for the Fantom-G Series workstations, V-Synth GT elastic audio synthesizer, and SonicCell synthesizer module.

“The evolution of 64-bit processing technology empowers musicians with faster PC audio processing than ever before,” says Vince LaDuca, Product Marketing Manager. “The professional audio and MIDI interfaces in our line of products are now a powerhouse combination with any cutting-edge PC on the market.”

64-bit drivers for Windows Vista

More information: Roland

Short links for October 2nd, 2007

Some interesting things I bookmarked on del.icio.us on October 2nd, 2007:

  • 40+ Media Players That Aren’t iTunes – Mashable lists over 40 players for those who don’t want to use iTunes.
  • McLaggan Smith Mugs – Lovely mugs, sweet mugs, cool mugs, and… more mugs.
  • The Atari 2600 celebrates 30 years of low-rez fun – Retro Thing takes a trip down memory lane.
  • Using CCTV for low-budget filmmaking – Mediashed involved a group of kids who usually hang around in the streets to engage in Video sniffin’ activities and turn CCTV into a free broadcasting system for their own use.
  • Microsoft bows to pressure on XP – Customer demand has forced Microsoft to extend the shelf life of Windows XP by five months.
  • rsizr – With rsizr, in addition to normal image rescaling and cropping, you can also resize images using a new image resizing algorithm called seam carving (a method of image retargeting) that tries to keep intact areas in your image that are richer in detail.
  • Ronald’s Crisis – On September 15, 2007 Ronald McDonald, who had fallen in love with the food of New York and become frustrated with the corporate agenda of McDonald’s, stepped into action closing every McDonald’s store in Manhattan.
  • M.T.A. Makes Deal for Cellphones in Stations – All 277 underground stations in the subway system are to be wired for cellphone use.
  • New AT&T terms of service – From now on, AT&T can terminate your connection for conduct that “tends to damage the name or reputation of AT&T, or its parents, affiliates and subsidiaries”.

Is stealing wireless wrong?

Related: , , , , , , Posted in random posts on Aug 24, 2007 - comment 4 comments

BBC News Magazine reports about the case where a man has been arrested after being spotted allegedly sitting in a street with a laptop using someone else’s unsecured wireless connection.

BBC News Magazine Wifi hack article

The discussion in this article is pretty interesting. A lot of people seem to think it’s OK to borrow some of this wireless internet since it wasn’t secured.

Ken from Evesham writes:

If you leave your wireless connection unsecured then it is your own fault. Just as you wouldn’t leave your front door unlocked, neither should you leave your wireless connection open.

To a certain extend I agree with Ken. It’s generally a bad idea to leave your front door unlocked, likewise you should secure your wireless internet *IF* you don’t want anybody walking in/using your internet connection. Now most people probably don’t want their house to be invaded by perfect strangers, but is it the same with their wireless connection? Do people really care? Do they even know their connection is left open for others to use?

In many cases, I think not. Many times I’ve experienced people’s total surprise when they find out their newly installed wireless router is open for use by anyone within broadcast range. They just don’t know how these things work. Computers have moved from the kingdom of geeks to your everyday family, but these new users generally don’t even know how to tell a legitimate email from a phishing scam email, let alone what WEP or WPA means.

However, I do believe it simply should NOT be possible to get punished for using someone else’s unsecured wireless network, simply because an unsecured network kind of implies it’s open to use. This is not the same as walking into a house, which is someone’s property.

Gerard from Naarden (Holland) writes:

I have not asked, nor do I particularly want to be irradiated by the wireless networks from my neighbours – I can pick up about a dozen. If it enters my house, I should be able to do with it what I want. Don’t like it? Get wired!

But alas, if you’re planning on cancelling your internet service and start using a free connection instead, there are already laws forbidding this. (at least in the UK).

The Communications Act 2003 says a “person who (a) dishonestly obtains an electronic communications service, and (b) does so with intent to avoid payment of a charge applicable to the provision of that service, is guilty of an offence”.

If I am travelling and I borrow a connection from an open network to spend 2 minutes on the internet, is that an offence because I could’ve bought a calling card to use with my mobile phone? When exactly does it become stealing?

Adrian from Manchester (UK) writes:

I don’t really see how it can be “stealing” if the person who paid still has all of what they paid for. In that respect, it’s not like your example of taking an apple from the overhanging branch of a tree.

Hmmm, this reminds me of copyright violation. When I download a movie or commercial computer game, I’m not stealing because I didn’t physically remove anything from anyone, right? Many people seem to justify downloading whatever they want with this type of reasoning.

Back to the wireless networks though… Microsoft Windows even attempts to connect to any unsecured networks it finds. Would it be a criminal offence if you’re unlucky enough to have some open networks in your vicinity?

Perhaps manufacturers need to make sure their wireless products come with security enabled by default, where users should explicitly configure the device to work in unsecured mode, and thereby waive the right to charge anyone with stealing their internet.

But hey, do you really want to leave your wireless network open for people to (ab)use. People commit crimes online you know…