Alto Professional brings latest live sound reinforcement gear to infoComm 2011

Alto Professional

Alto Professional has announced it will be exhibiting for the first time at booth #478 during the 2011 infoComm show from June 15-17 in Orlando, Florida.

Alto Professional will give system integrators, contractors, rental and staging companies and pro-AV attendees of all kinds their first look at the Alto Professional TRUESONIC and TOURMAX lines of speakers, ZEPHYR mixers, EMPIRE powered mixers, MIXPACK portable PA equipment and APX amplifiers. Attendees will be able to hear some of latest Alto Professional gear demonstrated live at the booth.

Alto Professional’s mission is to deliver products that give musicians and live sound reinforcement engineers alike the tools that they need to perform at their highest levels. Alto Professional’s products are designed to provide uncompromised accuracy, durability, portability and power with remarkable affordability.

“infoComm attendees are looking for gear that makes their installations sound phenomenal while staying within budget,” said Jay Schlabs, Executive Director, Alto Professional. “We definitely have what they want and at the show they’ll get the chance to see and hear our live sound equipment up close.”

More information: Alto Professional

comment

Short links for January 15th, 2011

Some interesting things I found recently:

# The Father of Drum Machines and the Father of MIDI Talk About Design and the Tempest

Dave Smith and Roger Linn (image by CDM)

Peter Kirn talks to the people responsible for one of the most exciting things over at the Winter NAMM show, the Tempest drum machine – Roger Linn and Dave Smith.

In songwriting, there was Rodgers and Hart, Gilbert and Sullivan. In music gear design, it’s hard not to assign a similar degree of expectation to the pairing of Dave Smith and Roger Linn.

Between them, these two designers have been a major part of what music technology is today. Dave Smith pioneered MIDI (even giving it its acronym), the first microprocessor-based instrument (the Prophet-5), the first programmable polyphonic synth, and other innovations at Sequential Circuits. Add to that landmarks in physical modeling research (at Yamaha) and the first PC soft synth. Roger Linn built the first programmable sampled-sound drum machine and with the LM-1, LinnDrum, Linn 9000, and his work on the MPC60 and MPC3000, introduced workflows and ideas in drum machines we now take for granted. It’s not easy to overstate the contributions of either designer.

Ambientaria Records Remember Chernobyl

# Chernobyl 25th Anniversary Project « Ambientaria Records

For the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl Accident, Ambientaria Records has gathered many Dark Ambient artists, including famous ones like Northaunt or Atomtrakt, for a Compilation project.

The album will be released on April 1st, 2011. It will be sold at a low price.

All the benefits shall be reversed to a Chernobyl Children International, is a non-profit organisation with United Nations NGO status, in order to help people suffering from Radiation Poisoning.

Check this Facebook page for details.

# Zimoun : Sound Sculptures & Installations

This is Compilation Video V2.2 (updated January 2011) of sound sculptures and installations by Swiss artist Zimoun. I can watch this for hours.

Zimoun's sound sculptures and installations are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the «artificial» and the «organic».

He is interested in the artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviours in sound and motion. He creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns.

More on Zimoun here.

# Emu Planet Phatt Hits

Cyberworm has another free sample pack out, featuring 61 Emu Plantet Phatt hit&stab sounds (wav+kontakt format, 24 bit, 44100 hz, stereo, 7 mb).

comment

Short links for January 7th, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Call for Works, Mark Your Calendar: Handmade Music, 1/15 in Brooklyn, Beyond – The regular series of DIY music tech parties continues in 2009.

Handmade Music 12/08

Peter Kirn writes:

Handmade Music is now a monthly affair at the wonderful 3rd Ward in Brooklyn, and increasingly, I want to work on adding an online, virtual component for the rest of the world to share. That means we’ll be looking for new works to share. The setup is this: for people in-person, we’re looking for installations, short performances, or projects you’d like to show off informally, science fair-style. Projects don’t have to be completed finished – in fact, this is a great way to get feedback on something you’re working on (and we certainly welcome repeat presentations as you make more progress, especially now that we’re monthly). We also welcome visual and audiovisual projects; we’ll have a projector onsite. (You’ll need to share if you can’t bring your own projector, but we can give you at least a few minutes of projection time.)

# DIYtar

Johan Larsby writes:

Which is the worlds sexiest and awesomest instrument? yes, the keytar. But what if you want special features on it and are to cheap to buy one of ebay?
That is what I am. Cheap and special, that is why I made my own.

# MIDImplant – MIDImplant is the smallest MIDI to Control Voltage (MIDI2CV) converter ever made, and it's dual channel…

# Making Simple PVC Flutes

PVC flutes by Jnkyrdguy

Instructables user Jnkyrdguy shows you how to make your own PCV flutes.

This flute design is a common one on the net, and for good reason. Not only is it simple to build, it's also relatively simple to learn and rewarding to play. It only took a month of on and of playing to be relatively proficient (meaning I could get a clean sound from the first two octaves without difficulty.) The flutes are keyed instruments and only play in one scale (without more complex fingerings) which is actually a plus when just noodling around since you can't easily hit a note outside of the major scale of that flutes key.

comment

Kurt Laurenz Theinert & Axel Hanfreich @ GLOW (Eindhoven, the Netherlands)

For the third successive time the center of Eindhoven is the stage and podium for GLOW, an open air exhibition providing a fascinating spectacle of applied light art and design on landmarks and other unique locations in Holland’s City of Light.

From 7 to 16 November, 19 works by artists, designers and architects from home and abroad can be seen and experienced along the exhibition route.

One of the works at GLOW 2008 is an audio-visual project by two German guys.

In collaboration with two software designers Kurt Laurenz Theinert developed a visual piano, with a keyboard that produces graphics instead of sounds. The drawings are projected on a 360° panorama in a darkened space. The space is filled with sounds, colors and lines and undergoes a surprising modification. He has adapted the setting of “Hammerhaus” for GLOW in cooperation with the musician Axel Hanfreich.

Kurt Laurenz Theinert / Axel Hanfreich @ GLOW
Kurt Laurenz Theinert / Axel Hanfreich @ GLOW — check Flickr for more images of GLOW

I had the pleasure of a show last night and I had a little talk with Axel afterwards. I thought an Ableton Live + controller setup would be great for this type of thing, but Axel was mainly using his Yamaha RS7000 sampler/sequencer for the performance. He explained he likes working with this particular sampler because of its wide range of effects and it’s easy to modify and tweak the sounds during a performance.

The equipment for sound and visuals isn’t physically linked, everything is played live. Kurt and Axel simply sync audio and light by using ears and eyes, so even though they have a limited repertoire of a dozen tracks the show will be different every time.

Here’s a video with some snippets from an earlier Hammerhouse performance.


Snippets from Hammerhouse @ YouTube

Since we only had a few minutes before they were doing another show I unfortunately didn’t have time to talk to Kurt as well, but I got from Axel that Kurt was using a MIDI controlled setup powered by vvvv for his visual piano, developed in collaboration with Roland Blach and Philip Rahlenbeck.

Visit the websites of Kurt and Axel for more information about their work and if you happen to be in Eindhoven in the next few days you should definitely check them out at GLOW.

comment

Score for a Hole in the Ground

The music of sound has an interesting post about some of the works of Jem Finer, one of the founding members of the Pogues.

Tim writes:

Since leaving the band in 1996 he has gone on to develop some inspired sound art & installations, including a piece of music, appropriately called Longplayer which is designed to play for 1,000 years without repetition.

One of his more recent projects is Score for a Hole in the Ground, an environmental sound installation in a forest in Ashford, Kent, UK.

Score for a Hole in the Ground
Score for a Hole in the Ground. Photograph by Andy McGowan (click image to enlarge)

Jem won the PRS Foundation New Music Award back in 2005. The prize was a sum of money with which to realise the project proposed as an entry to the competition.

You can read Jem’s original proposal here. It reads:

In the temple gardens of Kyoto, suikinkutsu, water chimes, provide a meditive focus for the ambient sounds of the surroundings. Water, overflowing stone bowls, trickles down through a layer of loose packed stones until it drips into a buried bowl. The resonance of these drips is listened to through a bamboo tube or with the “naked ear”. It is this attention to the subtle and beautiful timbres of the drips within the resonant chamber that hones the concentration of the listener.

This was the starting point for the Score for a Hole in the Ground project, a water driven musical instrument buried beneath the ground & amplified via a 7 meter high steel horn. As water slowly trickles into its sounding chamber, the drips hit metal splines creating percussive tones.

Check the Sound for a hole in the ground blog for more info, images and sound clips.

comment

More posts that match this tag