Results for headphones

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'headphones'.

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Sound Magic Headphone Mix updated to v2.1

Related: , , , , Posted in news on Nov 30, 2011 - comment 0 comments
Sound Magic Headphone Mix 2.0

Sound Magic has updated its Headphone Mix effect to version 2.1.

Headphone Mix is a special effect unit which suitable for those who make their music on headphone monitor system. Headphone Mix combines environment simulation system, frequency compensate system and HRTF technologies to emulate the speaker feelings on your headphone. Headphone Mix is provided as a VST effect unit under Windows or an Add-on for Sound Magic Supreme Pianos.

Changes in Headphone Mix v2.1

  • New Environment Algorithms.
  • Improved Frequency Compensate setting.
  • Fixed: Register may fail in Vista.
  • Fixed: Error automation items.

Headphone Mix is available to purchase for 19.90 EUR. Sound Magic customers pay 15 EUR.

More information: Sound Magic / Headphone Mix

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Mildon Studios releases HC38 Headphone Calibrator

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Mildon Studios has released HC38 Headphone Calibrator, an effect plug-in for Windows.

Mildon Studios HC38

HC38 Headphone Calibrator allows the user match the sound of their headphones to that of their studio monitors. It is ideal for field work, when studio monitors are not present, or to mix using headphones. It works by simulating several aspects of monitoring in a room environment. The user can adjust crossfeed, sound absorption, and room reflection.

Crossfeed is the merging of the sound coming from each speaker. The amount of crossfeed can be adjusted by choosing from three approximate speaker distances (3′, 5′, and 7′) and fine-tuned using the crossfeed fader.

What’s truly unique about the HC38 is its capability to simulate the room environment. The user can select from 6 representative flooring and room treatment materials that affect the way the sound is absorbed and reflected.

It also has the basic hi-pass and lo-pass filters so one can make adjustments based on the frequency response graph provided by the headphone manufacturer.

The HC38 Headphone Calibrator is available to purchase for the introductory price of $29 USD until November 10, 2011 (regular $35 USD).

More information: Mildon Studios / HC38 Headphone Calibrator

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Shure launches Fantastic Scholastic Recording Competition

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Shure has announced that entry registration for its eighth annual Fantastic Scholastic Recording Competition is now open until October 21 for university and college students nationwide.

Judged by a panel of renowned musicians and industry professionals, the competition enables students to record a musical composition with the same high-quality Shure gear used by professional musicians and engineers.

Shure Fantastic Scholastic Recording Competition

A random drawing on or about October 24 will narrow down the registrants to ten competing schools. Each participant will receive a standardized microphone locker from Shure that must be used to complete a recording project as part of the competition. Contents of the locker include one KSM313, two KSM32, two KSM44A, one KSM42, two KSM141, four SM57, two SM27, one Beta 52A, one Beta 57A, one Beta 91A, three Beta 98AMP, two Beta 181/S each with an additional Omni capsule, one SM7B, one VP88, and one A27M.

Competing teams from each school are required to track and mix an original piece of music, which will then be judged by a panel of industry professionals who will evaluate the recordings based on their overall fidelity, clarity, sonic balance, and creativity in selection and placement of the microphones. The winning school will be awarded the entire Shure microphone locker, valued at more than $10,000. In addition, students on one of the winning teams will receive prizes ranging from a KSM42 microphone, valued at $999 each to SRH840 headphones, valued at $250 each. Previous judges have included esteemed musicians and recording engineers, including Ed Cherney, Keith Olsen, Mike Clink, Frank Filipetti, Sylvia Massey, and Elliot Scheiner, among many others.

“Every year the caliber of student talent improves, and we’re amazed by the quality of their compositions,” said Terri Hartman, Director of Marketing Communications, Shure Americas. “As we move into our eighth year of the competition, we’re proud to continue supporting students who are pursing careers in the recording and music industry, and we look forward to another round of impressive submissions this year.”

The contestants chosen in the random drawing will be posted on Shure’s website on or around October 31, and dedicated microphone lockers will be sent in the following days. The winner of the Fantastic Scholastic Recording Competition, as well as the runner-up and honorable mention distinctions, will be announced on April 30, 2012.

More information: Shure / Fantastic Scholastic Recording Competition

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Sound Magic releases Headphone Mix 2.0

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Aug 11, 2011 - comment 0 comments

Sound Magic has released version 2.0 of Headphone Mix, a special effect unit suitable for those who make their music on a headphone monitor system.

Sound Magic Headphone Mix 2.0

Headphone Mix combines environment simulation system, frequency compensate system and HRTF technologies to emulate the speaker feelings on your headphone. Headphone Mix is provided as a VST effect unit under Windows or an Add-on for Sound Magic Supreme Pianos.

Compared with speakers, headphone lacks the blend of two channels,reverb from air and reflections from ears, which may lead to the lack of imaging and false feelings on sound field. Headphone Mix solves this issue by blending both channels, adding extra reverb to the sound and applying HRTF to emulate reflections.

To make the simulation more accurate, Headphone Mix features an environment simulation system where you can set room size, damp degree and reverb time of your work space. By doing so, Headphone Mix could obtain a closer result to your speakers.

Another reason for headphone can not have the same feel as your speakers is the headphone amp. If your amp can not fit your headphone good enough, it will cause the frequency response is not as accurate as your speakers. To solve this issue, Headphone Mix features three special designed filters to compensate the loss on frequency response. Thus it gives you the ability to get closer to your speaker even if you are using a bad headphone amp.

Headphone Mix features

  • Three bands frequency compensate system.
  • 3 sliders to control the effect depth.
  • A complete environment simulation system.
  • In-built HRTF algorithm.
  • Up to 32Bit/384KHz resolution.

Headphone Mix is available to purchase for €19.90 EUR.

More information: Sound Magic / Headphone Mix

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Audio-Technica launches Sounds of the summer, suggest summer anthem for a chance to win headphones

Related: , , , , , Posted in news on Jun 24, 2011 - comment 0 comments

Audio-Technica has announced the Sounds of the summer, a social media competition to find the nation’s favourite summer anthem.

Audio-Technica Sounds of the summer

Audio giant Audio-Technica has launched a social media quest to find the UK’s favourite summer track of all time. It is asking its fans and followers to tell the world on its Facebook page what is their favourite summer track and why. To help launch the online competition it has conducted a nationwide study into our musical preferences to find out how obsessed we are when it comes to our music. With singing at work and dancing in the street common place – we’ve certainly got some strange habits!

Almost everyone (96%) claimed they would rather give up films for a year over their music, with a further three quarters (73%) opting to ditch live sport, 37% ditching TV for music, and a dedicated third of people (34%) opting to ditch sex rather than going a year without music!

It also appears we like to express our love of music in public; three quarters of people (74%) admitting to spontaneously breaking into song while driving, a fifth 20% openly singing at work, 15% sing in the street and 11% have even danced in the street while listening to their iPod! Embarrassingly, almost all of us (90%) admit to having been caught doing one of these things!

Audio-Technica senior UK marketing manager Harvey Roberts said, “The UK is a nation with a long and distinguished history in producing world class music, so it’s no surprise to see such fanaticism towards music.

“The research shows that the majority of us actively listen to four-hours of music a day, which equates to more than 60 days a year. That is some serious listening time, and with a fifth of people preferring to use headphones, it makes sense to ensure you’ve got the very best equipment to make your experience as enjoyable as possible.”

The research was conducted as part of Audio-Technica’s ‘sounds of the summer’ campaign, where it is seeking the most popular ever ‘summer’ anthems via it’s Facebook page http://on.fb.me/mBPErZ. Five pairs of top of the range Audio-Tecnica headphones are up for grabs for the most popular suggestions.

The study also revealed that we like to listen to music in some unusual places, with 40% preferring to do it in bed, 27% in the shower, 11% while making love, and an obsessive 7% while asleep!

Audio-Technica also asked people how long they’d be prepared to queue to get tickets for their ‘ultimate’ music festival or summer show and despite the rise in internet bookings, a quarter would wait an hour and surprisingly one in six would be prepared to wait four-hours.

More information: Audio-Technica at Facebook

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Shure and Guitar Center Studios Give Musicians Room(s) to Rock

Funding for school music programs is disappearing nationwide, but there’s no shortage of people with a burning desire to sing or play an instrument. Recognizing a need for education, rehearsal, and recording facilities, microphone manufacturer Shure Incorporated is providing microphones and headphones to the growing list of Guitar Center Studios, as the music retailer expands its music education facilities in the U.S.

Guitar Center Studios

“Music education programs are disappearing from public schools, and individual lesson providers are challenged to deliver a broad offering of learning opportunities and tools,” says Tom Hemphill, Director of Guitar Center Studios. To counter this trend, Guitar Center Studios has taken the fundamental elements of music education—learning to play, connecting with peers, rehearsing together, and recording—and made them the cornerstones of a progressive learning pedagogy.

“Guitar Center Studios not only provides best-in-class music education, but a wide range of opportunities to apply that education,” Hemphill continues. “We serve as a community where musicians can learn, meet, rehearse, and record using professional equipment.” The facilities use a subscription model under which students can take advantage of any or all of these resources for one price.

In addition to providing music lessons and training in Pro Tools and Logic software, the program encourages musicians to get together, rehearse, and record themselves. Having access to professional-caliber equipment is a key component of this part of the program, and Shure has outfitted every Guitar Center Studios facility with SM58® handheld microphones, MX395 low-profile microphones and SRH240 professional headphones. “Shure has been a tireless supporter of what we’re doing, and we’re grateful,” says Hemphill. The microphones and headphones enable performances to be recorded easily, allowing musicians to review their performances and identify areas for improvement. “You can walk in, rehearse, and walk out with a CD that you can learn from,” says Hemphill.

“The Guitar Center brand is known and respected by musicians at every level, from beginners to working professionals,” says Abby Kaplan, Sales Director, Western U.S., at Shure Incorporated. “We’re proud to partner with Guitar Center Studios to help develop the next generation of performers.”

More information: Shure / Guitar Center Studios

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Short links for May 30th, 2011

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Hey You! What Song are you Listening to?

Asking random New Yorkers with headphones on what song they are listening to.

# OUTLOUD.FM

OUTLOUD.FM lets you create rooms where you can chat and listen to music with your friends with a real time collaborative playlist. Just sign in, pick a room name, and start uploading music!

# STACKED by Royal Sapien – 300+ tracks mixed into one hour of electronic music soundtrack

Stacked

# End of Train Device, New Album from Your Editor, and an Experiment in Releasing Music

Peter Kirn writes:

Yes, I create digital music, too. One of the things I’ve loved about CDM is the chance to share music making, from the construction of the tools to the production of performances and recordings. If that’s all we ever get out of music – getting to share with someone else – that’s already more than enough for me.

This week I’ve released my own End of Train Device, a full-length ambient / leftfield electronic album.

Namm Oddities 2011

# NAMM Oddities 2011

Barry Wood is back with another selection of interesting products showcased at the NAMM show.

Welcome to the 2011 edition of the NAMM Oddities …finally

This year the show went smoothly but due to a perfect storm created by of a pile of work (the paying variety), local politics, and the writing of my first now published book, the Oddities were nearly 4 months late.

There was no shortage of Oddities-worthy items at the show this year. Even though this is probably the last NAMM report to go online, I'm certain that there are a number of products that will see their press debut on these pages.

# Massive Subwoofer Chair

Still not satisfied with the bass of the average chair? If so, check out this insane 1000 Watt Subwoofer Chair from Canadian designer John Greg Ball.

# Vinyl Poised to Make Further Gains; Time To Ask, “What Does it All Mean”?

Photo by Karola Riegler Photography

At first, it seemed like it might be just a blip: amidst generally declining sales of physical music, down sharply from their 1990s boom, vinyl sales were trending up. The reversal started with a slight uptick in 2007 – already noticeable as the CD had begun its collapse. That slight uptick has turned into a small boom. From a tiny 300,000 units in US sales in 1993, the vinyl record is projected to do some 3.6 million units in sales.

# Dan303: New Sample Pack ‘Toys’

Dan has posted another free sample pack: “The sounds in this sample pack are made to replicate the sound of old broken children’s toys.”

# The Radiumphonic Workshop « Radium Audio Labs

Radium is inviting you to have a look behind the scenes at the Radiumphonic Workshop. In the video below we delve under the bonnet of Radium to have a look at what makes it all tick – the sound lab operated by the fine team at Radium. It demonstrates a rare glimpse of how we work, as well as showing off some of the machines, technology, people and creative approaches we use to manipulate sound!

# Design to Address Visual Performance in Music, Explained by a Giant Robot Face

Computing technology is an inherently disruptive thing, wonderfully so. It solves problems you didn’t know you had. It creates problems, then creates new problems in even trying to understand those problems. Simply using a computer is a kind of design statement.

You’ve seen questions about what happens with computer performance and audience interaction. But, in AMALGAM, design student Jacob Lysgaard asks those questions, and proposes solutions, in a new way: with a giant talking robot face.

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