Results for oscilloscope

Below are the posts that should have something to do with 'oscilloscope'.

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Blue Cat updates Analysis Plug-ins for Windows and Mac

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Blue Cat Audio Analysis Plug-Ins

Blue Cat Audio has announced the release of new versions its audio analysis plug-ins for Windows and Mac.

This update mainly brings output data refresh rate customization to improve MIDI or automation output for smoother side chaining, new trigger mode for the oscilloscope, note display for spectrum analyzers, pan law selection for stereoscopes, performance improvements on Mac and much more…

Changes in Blue Cat Analysis Plug-ins

  • Digital Peak Meter Pro v3.5
    • Output data rate (MIDI CC or automation) can now be customized, from 20 to 500 Hz.
    • Increased the default output data rate (from 20 to 50 Hz) for smoother side chaining and increased meters precision.
    • All meters can now be reset with a single button.
    • Envelope graphs can now be zoomed.
    • Windows: improved settings dialog loading time.
    • Mac: user interface performance improvement (up to 30% lighter on cpu).
  • FreqAnalyst Multi v1.91
    • Output data rate can now be customized, from 20 to 500 Hz.
    • Increased the default output data rate (from 20 to 50 Hz) for smoother spectrum display.
    • Note value for the current mouse location is now displayed, in addition to the frequency.
    • Windows: improved settings dialog loading time.
    • Mac: user interface performance improvement (up to 30% lighter on cpu).
  • FreqAnalyst Pro v1.94
    • Output data rate (MIDI CC or automation) can now be customized, from 20 to 500 Hz.
    • Increased the default output data rate (from 20 to 50 Hz) for smoother side chaining and more precise spectrum display.
    • Note value for the current mouse location is now displayed, in addition to the frequency.
    • Windows: improved settings dialog loading time.
    • Mac: user interface performance improvement (up to 30% lighter on cpu).
  • Oscilloscope Multi v1.7
    • Output data rate can now be customized, from 20 to 500 Hz.
    • Increased the default output data rate (from 20 to 50 Hz) for smoother curve display.
    • New trigger mode: the oscilloscopes can now be synced using a trigger, based on the value and direction of the incoming audio signal.
    • Windows: improved settings dialog loading time.
    • Mac: user interface performance improvement (up to 30% lighter on cpu).
  • StereoScope Multi v1.91
    • Output data rate can now be customized, from 20 to 500 Hz.
    • Increased the default output data rate (from 20 to 50 Hz) for more precise display.
    • Several pan laws can now be selected to match your preferences.
    • Windows: improved settings dialog loading time.
    • Mac: user interface performance improvement (up to 30% lighter on cpu).
  • StereoScope Pro v1.9
    • Output data rate (MIDI CC or automation) can now be customized, from 20 to 500 Hz.
    • Increased the default output data rate (from 20 to 50 Hz) for smoother side chaining and more precise display.
    • Several pan laws can now be selected to match your preferences.
    • Center position is now displayed with numbers in addition to the graphical meter.
    • Windows: improved settings dialog loading time.
    • Mac: user interface performance improvement (up to 30% lighter on cpu).

The upgrade is free for existing customers and can be downloaded from the same location as the previous version. If you do not own these plug-ins yet, demo versions in DirectX, VST, RTAS and Audio Unit formats are available for download.

More information: Blue Cat Audio

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Audiofile Engineering updates Spectre to v1.5

Audio Engineering Spectre

Audiofile Engineering has released version 1.5 of Spectre, a multi-instrument real-time audio analyzer for Mac OS X.

Spectre focuses squarely on live audio analysis by offering 17 different multi-channel and multi-trace meters. Each meter can have any number of traces or indicators, and each trace can have it’s own number of input channels, gain, mixing, filtering, ballistics and color (including transparency). You can have as many meters (or copies of meters) as your screen will allow! Spectre also gives you very precise control over color gradients.

Changes in Spectre v1.5

  • Inspector
  • A/B/C-weighted filters
  • VU and BBC Meters: calibration
  • VU Meter: Peak LED light (is a trace type)
  • Oscilloscope: trigger sync
  • Numerical Meter > Measurement: Crest Factor (ratio of the peak to the RMS)
  • Numerical Meter > Measurement: Form Factor (ratio of the peak to the average)
  • Lissajous meter: autozoom switch
  • Gain control for individual traces
  • Individual traces can be active/inactive
  • Individual traces hidden/visible
  • “Duplicate Meter” in Edit menu
  • Ability to show/hide grid in relevant meters
  • Redesigned Player featuring Ogg Vorbis and FLAC support

Spectre for Mac is available to purchase for $79 USD.

More information: Audiofile Engineering / Spectre

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Short links for October 22nd, 2009

Some interesting things I found recently:

Percussa AudioCubes workshop

# Audio Cubes: Tangible Interface for Audiovisual Creation, a Percussa workshop

AudioCubes designer Bert Schiettecatte will be hosting a series of one day workshops at his private workspace, for a select number of artists, starting November 10th 2009.

Workshop description: Starting with some theory, you will discover the history of AudioCubes, tangible interfaces, and their applications. The practical part of the workshop will let you master the technical aspects of using AudioCubes in sound, music and visual creation, and let you work on your own project using AudioCubes.

Topics covered:

  • history of audiocubes
  • overview of tangible interfaces
  • why were audiocubes created / fundamental ideas
  • how audiocubes work
  • the audiocubes hardware
  • audiocubes software for live performance, sound design and music production
  • how to use audiocubes to control MIDI software and hardware
  • how to MIDI map audiocubes
  • how to use AudioCubes with Max/MSP

# Google Prepares Music Search Service

From Wired.com:

Google plans to launch a music service, Wired.com has confirmed with sources familiar with the situation. Next to nothing is known about the service at this point, rumored to be called “Google Music,” “Google Audio,” or “One Box,” although we have confirmed that it will be announced next Wednesday, and that it will link out to two music services: Lala and iLike.

# Plogue Chipsounds review – retrogaming nostalgia

Torley takes a look at Plogue Chipsounds.

Tom Shear @ Waveformless shares his thoughts in his Chipsounds review

What excites me most about Chipsounds is the possibilities for the future. I’d love to see a couple options that weren’t present in the original machine introduced here. A filter section would definitely expand the possibilities (a handful of chips have filters available as their chip-specific settings), a more useful and flexible Portamento function would be great, and, as mentioned before, a wider array of effects would be a nice addition. That said, imposing the limitations of the original chips is not a bad thing in my opinion. It encourages the same kind of creative thinking and workarounds the original programmers used to use back in the day to get sounds you wouldn’t expect to be possible with such limited means. Plogue has approached this softsynth with a palpable sense of reverence and their affection for these outdated sound makers shines through in abundance. An exceptionally fun and unique instrument! [8/10]

# 2009 Roland Keyz ’n Beats Summit

The 2009 Roland Keyz ’n Beats Summit will be taking place in Hollywood, CA at the famous Musicians Institute on Saturday, October 24, 2009.

Space is limited, so pre-register now! Plus, you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a new JUNO-Di Synthesizer or SP-404SX Linear Wave Sampler. (Note: You must be present to win your prize.)

DIY Flux Capacitor Expander

# Veqtor’s corner: DIY Flux Capacitor Expander

Göran Sandström writes:

This demonstration uses my crude DIY flux capacitor for the Livewire AFG, basically 5 switches and 10 jacks corresponding to the flux cap pins. Two pin pairs are attenuated by two VCA's controlled by the makenoise/wiard wogglebug, crosspatched with the malekko/wiard noisering, which drives the melodic noodling, via a A-189-1 used as a bitcrusher, to perform cheap quantizing.

The sine output is sent to an input of a makenoise QMMG, driven by the A-143-1 envelope. About halfways through, a feedback path from the animated pulses, animated by A-143-1 LFOs, into the A-106-6 xpander filter (wogglebug controlled) goes into one of the pins on the flux cap expander, resulting in strange noises and unpredictable overtones.

# $10 Arduino Beatbox (remake of the $5 Picaxe Beatbox)

This is a simple sequencer machine which uses Capacitative Sensing Code for input to the Arduino. It is is a combination drumpad and sequencer. It has just two modes, record, and playback, and needs very few components; an Arduino (of course), and just 3 resistors and a piezo speaker. If you're feeling decadent, you can add an LED (with a resistor) for more "ooomph".

Seeed Studio DSO Nano

# Seeed Studio DSO Nano, Pocket Digital Storage Oscilloscope – Review

Blair Thompson reviews the Seeed Studio DSO Nano:

For those starting out in electronics as a hobby there are some tools that are required for the job. To begin with, a soldering iron, some screw drivers, perhaps tweezers and of course a multi-meter are probably what you would consider essential.

After a while though, you are going to be looking for more. Amongst the other goodies out there to help you on your way are oscilloscopes. In the past, advice on forums has always tended more towards purchasing a second hand scope. These tend to be had for around £100 on places like E-bay and most certainly will be a few years old if available at this sort of price. Well that is changing and I was excited yesterday to get my hands on a “Scope” that may just re-write the forum advice. Meet the Nano DSO from Seed Studio…

# eric archer . net » mini space rockers

Eric posts some samples of his mini space rockers analog percussion synthesizer.

Here are over 80 different electro drum / noise samples from the mini space rockers circuit… but you should really build it because its analog and it sounds a little different every time. and its cheap, so no excuses. I am offering these samples under a Creative Commons Attribution license. That means you are free to use them for whatever, but please credit me where appropriate.

PetSynth

# PetSynth

Chiron Bramberger turns his synth for the Commodore PET open source.

Petsynth features a two-octave keyboard layout, selectable note length, many selectable octaves, selectable pulse-width, vibrato, distortion, and noise or “drum mode” depending on how you use it.

All this without adding or hacking the Commodore PET in any way. Plus, it’s compiling from C, so it’s FAST – with very low latency.

The drum sounds are also crazy weird. You can also set the vibrato so high it sounds more like a laser gun or alien telephone.

# app:monome_tweet_reader [monome]

The Monome Tweet Reader is a simple application to display Twitter updates on your monome. It’s written in Java and should work on most platforms.

# Kseniya Simonova – Sand Animation – Ukraine’s Got Talent 2009 Winner

Kseniya Simonova is an Ukrainian artist who won Ukraine's Got Talent 2009. She uses a giant light box, dramatic music, imagination and "sand painting" skills to interpret Germany's invasion and occupation of Ukraine during WWII.

More on Kseniya Simonova

# m4l.lab.serialin – arduino controller for max 4 live (Vimeo)

Testing m4l interfacing capabilities with arduino through max's [serial] object. A simple 4-sensor controller for an FM synth. Analog and digital information is mapped onto midi control messages that can be routed inside live for events or modulation.

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Short links for September 11th, 2009

Nudge

Some interesting things I found recently:

# Nudge

Hobnox has launched Nudge, a virtual-instrument widget designed for self-expressive online music making & sharing.

It’s fun and simple to use and you don’t need to know a single thing about producing music to make your own individual songs in minutes!

Brought to you by the developers of the Audiotool, nudge is yet another example of the pioneering work of the team dedicated to creating the best online music production tools.

Nudge features

  • Includes 8 different sounds.
  • 16 Step Matrix allows drawing or selecting notes with your mouse.
  • Adjust each Track Volume & Panorama to correct the mix & set the overall Master volume.
  • Tempo can be adjusted.
  • Get + Share feature sends links and emails to your friends.
  • Embed the widget on your own profile, blog or webpage.

Lots of fun, just try it below.

# Cloudspeaker – What would your music taste look like as an object? Cloudspeaker is a conceptual work to create loudspeakers that reflect the music taste of their owner via 3d printing.

# DSO nano by Seeed Studio.

DSO nano is a pocket size digital storage oscilloscope fulfills basic electronic engineering requirements.

It is based on ARM Cortex™-M3 compatible 32 bit platform, equipped with 320*240 color display, SD card capability, USB connection, and chargeable batteries. Weighs only 60g!

DSO nano

More details on the Seeed Studio blog.

# little-scale: Multiplexing MIDI Output Streams with Arduino

Sebastian Tomczak writes:

Arduino can easily generate MIDI output data for use with external synths and modules or to take physical events and turn them into control data for use with software synths and applications etc.

Although the Arduino only has one Serial output, it is still possible to use a multiplexer to send multiple streams of MIDI data to multiple devices.

The idea is pretty simple. The Arduino still uses its TX pin for sending serial data, but uses an analog multiplexer to choose where that data is going (say, one of two MIDI outputs for example). The analog multiplexer that I have chosen is a 4051 and can 'route' the data to up to eight different places.

PIC_MIDI

# PIC_MIDI

Giancarlo Todone of nerds’ headquarter posts introduces to PIC_MIDI, a homebrew solution for converting an old keyboard to MIDI.

An "open" electronic project involving a Microchip PIC 18F452, two simple and cheap de-mux 74hc138, a bunch of passive components and some software to build a MIDI master keyboard controller supporting velocity, continuous controller handling and strict adherence to MIDI protocol. Ease of setup and cheapness of required parts make this project suitable for intermediate hobbists, while technical specs such as low latency and high sensitivity to note-velocity make the device desirable for all musicians and DIY enthusiasts having an old keyboard lying around. EAGLE CAD schematics allow for quick circuit understanding and assisted production of custom PCB, while simple MikroC PIC code provides additional customizability in circuit's behaviour.

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